Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS in the News

Can Hackers Get Into Your Pacemaker?

Prof. Kevin Fu is quoted in this article in The Atlantic, which summarizes a number of factors that contribute toward vulnerabilities in medical devices like insulin pumps, defibrillators, fetal monitors, and scanners. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Ambiq Micro Announces $15 Million Funding Round

ECE startup Ambiq Micro, a leader in ultra-low power integrated circuits for power-sensitive applications, announced that is has closed a $15 million Series C funding round to accelerate the development and marketing of its SPOT (Subthreshold Power Optimized Technology) platform. [More about Ambiq Micro] [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Technology Transfer  

Technological implants will allow us to improve our bodily functions

Trans-humanism isn't just about appearance. Bulky night-vision goggles have been used for years by the armed forces, but scientists at the University of Michigan [Prof. Zhaohui Zhong and his group] recently unveiled technology that could lead to contact lenses that allow the wearer to see in the dark. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graphene  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Wearable electronics  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Estonia has online voting. Should the United States?

Vox takes a look at voting in Estonia, a country that is an early adopter of online voting. The article notes that the convenience of the system is outweighed by the security risks inherent in such systems and references the work done by Prof. J. Alex Halderman in exposing weaknesses in the Estonian system and in an earlier proposed system in Washington DC. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Hackers Could Decide Who Controls Congress Thanks to Alaskas Terrible Internet Ballots

In today's elections, Alaska will use its first-in-the-nation Internet voting system in today's mid-term elections -- a move that top security experts, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, consider a security nightmare that could put control of the US Congress in the hands of hackers. More in this article at The Intercept. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Decode DC: The Future of Voting. Prof J. Alex Halderman Interviewed on Electronic Voting

In this podcast, host Andrea Seabrook and Decode DC reporter Miranda Green explore the potential benefits and risks of on-line voting. Coming down in the side of caution is Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who has demonstrated security vulnerabilities in voting systems worldwide and who says that "the problem with voting and computer technology is that hackers can change the election result to be whatever they want." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Rise of e-voting is inevitable, as is risk of hacking

As elections approach in both Canada and the US, more municipalities are considering the use of Internet voting or electronic voting machines. This article in the Globe and Mail describes some of the risks associated with this trend and references the work that was done during the last national election cycle when Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his students hacked the proposed Washington DC Internet voting system. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

New Jersey e-vote experiment after Sandy declared a disaster

This article in Aljazeera America details research into the security of electronic voting that was taken up in New Jersey following Hurricane Sandy. Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted in long form in the article. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

UM Professor Named on of Brilliant 10 for Building Energy Scavenging Sensors

Prof. Prabal Dutta was interviewed on Michigan Radio's Stateside segment regarding his work on energy scavenging sensors, called smart dust, that won't need batteries to operate. Listen to the interview here. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Internet of Things  Sensors  

Prof. Kevin Fu Answers Your Questions About Medical Device Security

in this Slashdot posting, Prof. Fu answers submitted questions about the security of medical devices, with subjects ranging from attack surfaces for drug-administering pumps to what to do if you've been the recipient of a hackable implant. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

3 Lessons American Districts Can Learn From Foreign Schools

THE Journal reviews new approaches to learning that US K-12 schools are investigating, including work by Prof. Elliot Soloway into the use of smartphones as educational aids. Prof. Soloway has worked with schools in Singapore on an inquiry-based approach to learning that employs mobile technology, and he is now working to bring this same approach back to local schools. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

Long-Lived Blue OLED Could Lead to Better Displays

Many displays in smartphones and televisions generate red and green light with phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes but use more energy-hungry fluorescent devices for blue. That's because blue PHOLEDs only last for a couple of days. Now Prof. Stephen Forrest and his group have found a way to extend the lifetime of blue PHOLEDs by a factor of 10, bringing them much closer to commercial use. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Displays  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

These Energy-Saving, Batteryless Chips Could Soon Power The Internet Of Things

The story focuses on how the new Michigan/UVa start-up company, PsiKick, is going to help enable the Internet of Things thanks to their very low power processing, called subthreshold processing. Also mentioned is the Michigan startup, Ambiq Micro, which has also entered the low power revolution. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Internet of Things  Technology Transfer  Wentzloff, David  

Theres Really No Delete Button on the Internet

In this interview on Michigan Radio, Prof. Kevin Fu talks about Internet privacy and the fact that boundaries don't really exist in the age of cloud computing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Privacy  

Research finds No Large Scale Heartbleed Exploit Attempts Before Vulnerability Disclosure

Did the NSA or anyone else take advantage of the Heartbleed bug prior to its public disclosure? This Threat Post story describes research by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and others which indicates that traffic data collected on several large networks shows no exploit attempts in the months leading up to the public disclosure. The article has also been slashdotted here. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Privacy  Security (Computing)  

Facets of Privacy Discussed at Inauguration Panel

At a symposium to mark the inauguration of President Mark S. Schlissel, leading privacy scholars from U-M and Carnegie Mellon University, including Prof. Kevin Fu, discussed the issues surrounding privacy, social media, and cloud computing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Privacy  

Jetpac: The Implications of the Google Acquisition

In this posting on Dell's Tech Page One site, Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja comments on how the totality of social media posts can, when analyzed on a massive scale, reveal deeply sensitive personal information. Google's recent acquisition of Jetpac wil allow the search engine company to expand its AI capabilities in directions that would potentially allow it to create such user profiles. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Big Data  Machine Learning  

Tweet Analysis Paints More Accurate Employment Picture Than The US Government Release

As reported in International business Times, U-M researchers including Prof. Michael Cafarella and graduate student Dolan Antenucci have found a quicker and more accurate measure of unemployment in America -- through analysis of Twitter data. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  

Researchers Hack Into Michigans Traffic Lights

MIT Technology Review has covered work led by Prof. J. Alex Halderman, in which he and students including Branden Ghena have demonstrated security flaws in a common system of networked traffic signals. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Slashdot: Can Our Computers Continue To Get Smaller and More Powerful?

Prof. Igor Markov's article in this week's issue of the journal Nature, along with the ARS Technica article that provides commentary, have been slashdptted. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Markov, Igor  

Are processors pushing up against the limits of physics?

ARS Technica has provided a lengthy analysis and commentary on Prof. Igor Markov's article that appeared in the journal Nature regarding the limits of computing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Markov, Igor  

The Limits of Moores Law Limits

Following an interview with Prof. Igor Markov, EE Times asks: ...now that we are approaching the atomic scale, many see the handwriting on the wall: When you get down to one atom per memory cell, Moore's Law has to end -- or has it? [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Markov, Igor  

Court case: Voting via the Internet is a civil rights issue for disabled

The debate over whether Americans should be permitted to vote via the Internet has long pitted voting system manufacturers, who frame it to election officials as inevitable and modern, against cybersecurity experts including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who has repeatedly demonstrated vulnerabilities in voting systems worldwide. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Low-Power Laser Could Speed CPUs

Prof. Bhattacharya's breakthrough room-temperature polariton laser enables commercialization of the technology. One potential application discussed by the author is to enable on-chip optical interconnects. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Electronic devices  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Utah is correct to both be at the front of online voting, and cautiously study security

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is watching as the state of Utah convenes a committee to study how the Beehive State might proceed with online voting. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

A Batteryless Sensor Chip for the Internet of Things

MIT Technology Review described the chips being made by PsiKick, a company co-founded by Prof. David Wentzloff. These low-power chips are the key to the promise of the Internet of Things. Their chip design has been tested in a wearable EKG monitor that runs entirely on body heat. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Technology Transfer  Wearable electronics  Wentzloff, David  

US Researchers Develop Room Temperature Polariton Laser

Device could be future optical replacement for on-chip wires. Scientists from the University of Michigan (Prof. Bhattacharya) and Intel Corporation in the US have demonstrated what appears to be the first electrically powered, room-temperature polariton laser. The device, based on a GaN-based microcavity diode, could advance efforts to replace on-chip wire connections with lasers, leading to smaller and more powerful electronics, say the researchers. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Electronic devices  

Tailor-made surface swaps light polarization

A new approach to manipulating light using two-dimensional metamaterials called metasurfaces offers a compact alternative to traditional methods. The researchers believe the basic geometry of cascading patterned metallic sheets can provide the basis for cleverly designing and fabricating a broad range of optical devices, including symmetric circular polarizers, polarization rotators, and asymmetric linear polarizers. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Grbic, Anthony  Guo, L. Jay  Metamaterials  

Cockroaches rule! And heres why

Cockroaches actually have much to teach in the realm of robust systems - something we want in our technology. The article references a recent video featuring Prof. Shai Revzen's work in applying cockroach lessons to robotics. [Full Story]

Semitransparent PV cells go designer

Prof. Jay Guo and his team have engineered what are believed to be the first semitransparent, colored photovoltaic cells. Broadening the use of solar power while maintaining aesthetic appeal for all kinds of environments, this technology could become energy-harvesting billboards on the sides of buildings, solar window shades in our homes and even stained glass, Guo said. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Solar Cell Technology  

Hack the Vote: The Perils of the Online Ballot Box

In the Wall Street Journal opinion piece, the authors quote Prof. J. Alex Halderman on electronic voting, who says "With today's security technology, no country in the world is able to provide a secure Internet voting system." More that 30 US states and territories currently allow some form of internet voting. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Business Adapts to a New Style of Computer

"For more than a decade technologists have predicted and argued about the onslaught of these ubiquitous devices [Internet of Things]. 'There is lot of quibbling about what to call it, but theres little doubt that were seeing the inklings of a new class of computer,' says David Blaauw, who leads a lab at the University of Michigan that makes functioning computers no bigger than a typed letter o." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Internet of Things  

Silicon Valley to Get a Cellular Network, Just for Things

Prof. David Blaauw comments on What's Next - which in this article means the Internet of Things, and the need for a wireless network for "things" rather than person-to-person communication. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Internet of Things  

BBC: Is Estonia e-Voting Safe?

In this audio interview, Prof. J. Alex Halderman details some of the security risks that his research team has uncovered in the Estonian electronic voting system. Up to a quarter of the electorate will vote online. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Terahertz Detectors Go Handheld

"Today terahertz detectors are commonplace in airports, where you enter a glass-walled chamber while the detector swings around you, snooping under your clothes for weapons. Now researchers have found a way to downsize the detector portion of those machines into chip-sized devices." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Terahertz Technology  

Schools adding computer coding to curriculum

Prof. Elliot Soloway comments on the trend toward integration of coding as an important aspect of one's education. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

The Washington Post: How Russia could easily hack its neighbors elections

Research conducted by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborators has shown a number of security flaws in Estonia's Internet voting system. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

PC World: Estonian electronic voting system vulnerable to attacks, researchers say

Research conducted by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborators has shown a number of security flaws in Estonia's Internet voting system. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

The Guardian: Estonian e-voting shouldnt be used in European elections, say security experts

Research conducted by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborators has shown a number of security flaws in Estonia's Internet voting system. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, and Lately, Coding

The spread of coding instruction, while still nascent, is "unprecedented theres never been a move this fast in education," according to Prof. Elliot Soloway. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

Eye of the Tiger: U.S. Army Eyes Night Vision Contact Lenses

"Were talking featherweight futuristic night vision awesomeness here, Iron Man soldier suit style, without the hulking suit. They seem almost as cool as Googles blood glucose-level tracking contacts." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graphene  Sensors  

Wired: Its Crazy What Can Be Hacked Thanks to Heartbleed

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Security (Computing)  

PsiKicks batteryless sensors poised for coming Internet of Things

Infrared Sensor Could Lead to Night Vision Contact Lenses (with video)

New York Times: Study Finds No Evidence of Heartbleed Attacks Before the Bug Was Exposed

Heartbleed Software Snafu: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Heartbleed Hackers Steal Encryption Keys in Threat Test

Hacker From China Wastes Little Time in Exploiting Heartbleed

Researchers find thousands of potential targets for Heartbleed OpenSSL bug

CSE researchers have used ZMap, their Internet address scanning software, to perform comprehensive scans of the IPv4 address space and to identify servers still vulnerable to the Heartbleed exploit. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Michigan Daily: Internet security flaw left University sites vulnerable