Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS in the News

U-M Develops Controls for Bipedal Robots with Model-Based Design

Developing a two-legged robot capable of walking and running like a human is a key goal for robotics researchers. In 2011, Professor Jessy Grizzle and a small team of Ph.D. students advanced toward that goal with MABEL, a bipedal robot that could run a nine-minute mile and regain its balance after negotiating an eight-inch step. When MABEL's successor, MARLO, needed new coding, the researchers moved away from hand-coding, and used Model-Based Design with MATLAB and Simulink to speed up the development of real-time control systems for MARLO and other bipedal robots. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Voice Control Will Force an Overhaul of the Whole Internet

This article in Wired reports on Sirius, the open-source personal digital assistant released by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang and graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focused in in the projects underlying thrust: that the data centers of today are not built to accommodate the voice-based data loads of tomorrow. Sirius is a tool that will help researchers to understand the needs of next-generation data centers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Critical iVote security flaws expose risk of online voting fraud

This article in CNet covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  

Australian online voting system may have FREAK bug

This article in The Register covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

NSW election result could be challenged over iVote security flaw

This article in The Guardian covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Edwin Olson: Driverless Cars (radio interview)

In this radio interview on Newstalk ZB in New Zealand, Prof. Edwin Olson discusses the future of autonomous vehicles, how autonomy might be introduced into the marketplace, and M City, the automated test track for autonomous vehicle research and testing at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Researchers just built a free, open-source version of Siri

This article in VentureBeat reports on Sirius, the open-source intelligent personal assistant software introduced by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, along with graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focuses on the open-source nature of Sirius and quotes the researchers regarding its possibilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Engineers Bring A New Open-Source Siri To Life

This article in readwrite reports on Sirius, the open-source intelligent personal assistant software introduced by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, along with graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focuses in part on the open-source nature of Sirius and the potential that creates for anyone to create a customized personal assistant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Free Sirius One-Ups Siri

This article in EE Times reports on Sirius, the open-source intelligent personal assistant software introduced by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, along with graduate student Johann Hauswald. The article focuses in part on Sirius's ability to process photos. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

What You Tweet Might Tell Janet Yellen Its Time to Raise Rates

Economists at the Fed are looking into whether non-traditional data could improve the accuracy and timeliness of the forecasts they put before monetary-policy decision makers about every six weeks. This could include Prof. Mike Cafarella's social media tool that monitors tweets to create an index of initial claims for unemployment. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Software Systems  Social Media  

Sirius Is the Google-Backed Open Source Siri

This article in Motherboard discusses Sirius, the open-source digital assistant developed by CSE researchers, its ability to process images, its open-source roots, and ultimately reflects on its utility versus a past attempt in this realm. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Chappie ponders future of humans in a world run on artificial intelligence

Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja is quoted in this article in The Washington Times on the emergence of artificial intelligence and the need for controls to be established before AI can operate independently of human oversight. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Security Concerns Raised Regarding Clinton Offices Use of Private Email

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted regarding security concerns in this Al Jazeera America article on Hillary Clinton's use of a private email service while in office as Secretary of State. Prof. Halderman has previously demonstrated vulnerabilities in the security of a number of trusted systems, including airport body scanners and electronic voting systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Outdated Encryption Keys Leave Phones Vulnerable to Hackers

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric have used their ZMap scanning software to determine that of the 14 million web sites worldwide that offer encryption, more than 5 million remain vulnerable to the FREAK encryption flaw as of March 4. Prof. Halderman is quoted on the danger of weak crypto and "back doors" in this New York Times article on the subject. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Researchers Map Extent of FREAK Security Flaw

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric have used their ZMap scanning software to determine that of the 14 million web sites worldwide that offer encryption, more than 5 million remain vulnerable to the FREAK encryption flaw as of March 4. The U-M researchers are part of a broad effort that has demonstrated the dangers inherent in the older 512-bit encryption code that is still in use. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Careers in Robotics: Spotlight on the University of Michigan

This article in Robotics Business Review takes a look at robotics research at Michigan, in particular the work in perception and autonomy that is being conducted by Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice. It also examines how that research is a key ingredient in the work to be done on autonomous vehicles at Michigan's new Mobility Transportation Center. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Robots In Our Image

If two-legged locomotion is the next frontier for robotics, Prof. Jessy Grizzle and his team are setting the standard for graceful, human-like walking by robots. He talks about his own robot, MARLO, in the context of the upcoming DARPA Robotics Challenge. MARLO is not entered, but is making great strides here at the University of Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Cooking robot may offer artificial culinary intelligence

Prof. Jason Corso was asked to comment on research that involved the use of artificial intelligence to provide robots with the ability to recognize objects and learn actions by watching humans. In this case, the robot was watching a video. He said it is possible to reconstruct the 3D environment (2D space plus time) that is being shown in the video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Corso, Jason  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Distinguished University Professor lecture involves walking robots

Despite tremendous advances in the field of two-legged robots during the past few decades, bipedal machines are a long way from impersonating, much less improving upon, the human gait. In his inaugural lecture as the Elmer G. Gilbert Distinguished University Professor of Engineering, Jessy Grizzle will discuss the efforts underway in his lab to close this gap. All are welcome at the lecture, Feb. 4 at 4pm in the Rackham Amphitheatre. A reception will follow in the Assembly Hall. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Coding For Kids: Teaching Girls, Minorities To Program Important For A Diverse Tech Workforce

This story on the International Business Times website speaks about creating a new generation of programmers by reaching out to demographics that historically haven't considered coding as a profession. In it, Prof. Elliot Soloway says, "Coding is about giving kids the new pencil and paper, it's giving them the new typewriter, the new tool to say things that they couldn't say before." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Programming  Soloway, Elliot  

How drones and insects merged in ways that might surprise you

Michigan is designing the microelectronics that are the eyes, ears, and brains of the tiny insect-like drones being developed under the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) collaborative. The research at Michigan is part of the Center for Objective Microelectronics & Biomemetic Advanced Technology, directed by Prof. Kamal Sarabandi. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  MEMS and Microsystems  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Arborlight: LED-Based Skylights and Sunshine in Real Time

Prof. Pei-cheng Ku is a co-founder of the startup company Arborlight, which promises the benefits of a window or skylight in offices where neither is available. Xconomy reports that their "Lightwell product looks and behaves just like a skylight. It tunes to geography and time, tracking the position of the sun throughout the day, mimicking the varying color, intensity, and directionality of daylight as normally experienced through traditional windows and skylights." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Technology Transfer  

Stryd, co-founded by Prof. Robert Dick, about to launch wearable technology for runners

Prof. Robert Dick is co-founder of Stryd, a startup company that is getting ready to launch what they are calling the worlds first wearable power meter for runners. The device promises to help runners improve efficiency, monitor individual progress, and simplify training. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dick, Robert  Embedded Computing and Systems  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Technology Transfer  

Olson on Mobility Transformation Facility

In this audio interview, Prof. Edwin Olson speaks about the 36-acre Mobility Transformation Facility at Michigan and his work in developing and testing technologies for use in autonomous vehicles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Talking Book trial to help poorest of poor in Ghana

[BBC News: Nov 20] Hundreds of handheld audio computers, called Talking Books, are to be given to some of Ghana's poorest communities to help spread potentially life-saving information. Leading the low power chip design for the devices at Michigan are Profs. David Blaauw and Peter Chen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Chen, Peter  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Can Hackers Get Into Your Pacemaker?

Prof. Kevin Fu is quoted in this article in The Atlantic, which summarizes a number of factors that contribute toward vulnerabilities in medical devices like insulin pumps, defibrillators, fetal monitors, and scanners. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Ambiq Micro Announces $15 Million Funding Round

ECE startup Ambiq Micro, a leader in ultra-low power integrated circuits for power-sensitive applications, announced that is has closed a $15 million Series C funding round to accelerate the development and marketing of its SPOT (Subthreshold Power Optimized Technology) platform. [More about Ambiq Micro] [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Technology Transfer  

Technological implants will allow us to improve our bodily functions

Trans-humanism isn't just about appearance. Bulky night-vision goggles have been used for years by the armed forces, but scientists at the University of Michigan [Prof. Zhaohui Zhong and his group] recently unveiled technology that could lead to contact lenses that allow the wearer to see in the dark. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graphene  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Wearable electronics  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Estonia has online voting. Should the United States?

Vox takes a look at voting in Estonia, a country that is an early adopter of online voting. The article notes that the convenience of the system is outweighed by the security risks inherent in such systems and references the work done by Prof. J. Alex Halderman in exposing weaknesses in the Estonian system and in an earlier proposed system in Washington DC. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Hackers Could Decide Who Controls Congress Thanks to Alaskas Terrible Internet Ballots

In today's elections, Alaska will use its first-in-the-nation Internet voting system in today's mid-term elections -- a move that top security experts, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, consider a security nightmare that could put control of the US Congress in the hands of hackers. More in this article at The Intercept. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Decode DC: The Future of Voting. Prof J. Alex Halderman Interviewed on Electronic Voting

In this podcast, host Andrea Seabrook and Decode DC reporter Miranda Green explore the potential benefits and risks of on-line voting. Coming down in the side of caution is Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who has demonstrated security vulnerabilities in voting systems worldwide and who says that "the problem with voting and computer technology is that hackers can change the election result to be whatever they want." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Rise of e-voting is inevitable, as is risk of hacking

As elections approach in both Canada and the US, more municipalities are considering the use of Internet voting or electronic voting machines. This article in the Globe and Mail describes some of the risks associated with this trend and references the work that was done during the last national election cycle when Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his students hacked the proposed Washington DC Internet voting system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

New Jersey e-vote experiment after Sandy declared a disaster

This article in Aljazeera America details research into the security of electronic voting that was taken up in New Jersey following Hurricane Sandy. Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted in long form in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

UM Professor Named one of Brilliant 10 for Building Energy Scavenging Sensors

Prof. Prabal Dutta was interviewed on Michigan Radio's Stateside segment regarding his work on energy scavenging sensors, called smart dust, that won't need batteries to operate. Listen to the interview here. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Internet of Things  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Sensors  

Prof. Kevin Fu Answers Your Questions About Medical Device Security

in this Slashdot posting, Prof. Fu answers submitted questions about the security of medical devices, with subjects ranging from attack surfaces for drug-administering pumps to what to do if you've been the recipient of a hackable implant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

3 Lessons American Districts Can Learn From Foreign Schools

THE Journal reviews new approaches to learning that US K-12 schools are investigating, including work by Prof. Elliot Soloway into the use of smartphones as educational aids. Prof. Soloway has worked with schools in Singapore on an inquiry-based approach to learning that employs mobile technology, and he is now working to bring this same approach back to local schools. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

Long-Lived Blue OLED Could Lead to Better Displays

Many displays in smartphones and televisions generate red and green light with phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes but use more energy-hungry fluorescent devices for blue. That's because blue PHOLEDs only last for a couple of days. Now Prof. Stephen Forrest and his group have found a way to extend the lifetime of blue PHOLEDs by a factor of 10, bringing them much closer to commercial use. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

These Energy-Saving, Batteryless Chips Could Soon Power The Internet Of Things

The story focuses on how the new Michigan/UVa start-up company, PsiKick, is going to help enable the Internet of Things thanks to their very low power processing, called subthreshold processing. Also mentioned is the Michigan startup, Ambiq Micro, which has also entered the low power revolution. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Technology Transfer  Wentzloff, David  

Theres Really No Delete Button on the Internet

In this interview on Michigan Radio, Prof. Kevin Fu talks about Internet privacy and the fact that boundaries don't really exist in the age of cloud computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Research finds No Large Scale Heartbleed Exploit Attempts Before Vulnerability Disclosure

Did the NSA or anyone else take advantage of the Heartbleed bug prior to its public disclosure? This Threat Post story describes research by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and others which indicates that traffic data collected on several large networks shows no exploit attempts in the months leading up to the public disclosure. The article has also been slashdotted here. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Facets of Privacy Discussed at Inauguration Panel

At a symposium to mark the inauguration of President Mark S. Schlissel, leading privacy scholars from U-M and Carnegie Mellon University, including Prof. Kevin Fu, discussed the issues surrounding privacy, social media, and cloud computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Jetpac: The Implications of the Google Acquisition

In this posting on Dell's Tech Page One site, Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja comments on how the totality of social media posts can, when analyzed on a massive scale, reveal deeply sensitive personal information. Google's recent acquisition of Jetpac wil allow the search engine company to expand its AI capabilities in directions that would potentially allow it to create such user profiles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

Tweet Analysis Paints More Accurate Employment Picture Than The US Government Release

As reported in International business Times, U-M researchers including Prof. Michael Cafarella and graduate student Dolan Antenucci have found a quicker and more accurate measure of unemployment in America -- through analysis of Twitter data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Software Systems  

Researchers Hack Into Michigans Traffic Lights

MIT Technology Review has covered work led by Prof. J. Alex Halderman, in which he and students including Branden Ghena have demonstrated security flaws in a common system of networked traffic signals. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Slashdot: Can Our Computers Continue To Get Smaller and More Powerful?

Prof. Igor Markov's article in this week's issue of the journal Nature, along with the ARS Technica article that provides commentary, have been slashdptted. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Markov, Igor  

Are processors pushing up against the limits of physics?

ARS Technica has provided a lengthy analysis and commentary on Prof. Igor Markov's article that appeared in the journal Nature regarding the limits of computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Markov, Igor  

The Limits of Moores Law Limits

Following an interview with Prof. Igor Markov, EE Times asks: ...now that we are approaching the atomic scale, many see the handwriting on the wall: When you get down to one atom per memory cell, Moore's Law has to end -- or has it? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Markov, Igor  

Court case: Voting via the Internet is a civil rights issue for disabled

The debate over whether Americans should be permitted to vote via the Internet has long pitted voting system manufacturers, who frame it to election officials as inevitable and modern, against cybersecurity experts including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who has repeatedly demonstrated vulnerabilities in voting systems worldwide. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Low-Power Laser Could Speed CPUs

Prof. Bhattacharya's breakthrough room-temperature polariton laser enables commercialization of the technology. One potential application discussed by the author is to enable on-chip optical interconnects. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Electronic devices  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Utah is correct to both be at the front of online voting, and cautiously study security

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is watching as the state of Utah convenes a committee to study how the Beehive State might proceed with online voting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)