Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE News for 2014

ECE Students and alumni celebrate research and progress at the 2014 Engineering Graduate Symposium

New ideas abounded at 2014s Graduate Symposium, the College of Engineerings annual event to highlight research and engage prospective graduate students. ECE researchers had a strong presence at this year's event, comprising nearly 80 of the day's more than 240 presentations. Several of these placed first or second in their field in the poster presentation contest. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Shayna Simon - From Intern to Full-Time, Making Company Experience Matter

Shayna Simon has been busy. A Michigan native from West Bloomfield and a senior in Electrical Engineering, shes already taken huge steps to getting her career on track after graduation. Shayna recently accepted a job offer at General Motors, and will dive into a position in infotainment there after school. Shell be working on a team serving as a bridge between software and hardware development. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Winter 2015: Multidisciplinary Capstone (MDE) Design Pilot

Course No.: EECS 498-005
Credit Hours: 3 or 4 credits
Instructor: Brian Gilchrist
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Course Description:
This pilot course is about providing students real-world, multidisciplinary design project opportunities to satisfy their MDE requirement and for EE masters students interested in meaningful project experiences. [More Info]

Alumni startup Avegant announces $9.37M funding round - led by Intel

Intel announced $62M in new investments in 16 tech companies. One of those companies is Avegant, founded by ECE alumni Ed Tang and Allan Evans. Avegant is a virtual-reality company that is developing Glyph, a set of consumer goggles that double as headphones. The company expects to begin shipping devices in 2015. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Technology Transfer  

Ambiq Micro Announces $15 Million Funding Round

ECE startup Ambiq Micro, a leader in ultra-low power integrated circuits for power-sensitive applications, announced that is has closed a $15 million Series C funding round to accelerate the development and marketing of its SPOT (Subthreshold Power Optimized Technology) platform. [More about Ambiq Micro] [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Technology Transfer  

David G. Mazur Honored for Leadership in Stealth Technologies

EE alumnus David G. Mazur, vice president and B-2 program manager, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, was selected by the National Defense Industrial Association to receive its 2014 Rear Adm. Robert H Gormley Combat Survivability Leadership award. Mazur accepted the award on Nov. 13 during NDIA's annual Aircraft Survivability Technical Forum held at Johns Hopkins University Advanced Physics Laboratory. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Alumni  

Technological implants will allow us to improve our bodily functions

Trans-humanism isn't just about appearance. Bulky night-vision goggles have been used for years by the armed forces, but scientists at the University of Michigan [Prof. Zhaohui Zhong and his group] recently unveiled technology that could lead to contact lenses that allow the wearer to see in the dark. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graphene  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Wearable electronics  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Yelin Kim Wins Best Student Paper Award at ACM Multimedia 2014 for Research in Facial Emotion Recognition

Yelin Kim has won the Best Student Paper Award at the 22nd ACM International Conference on Multimedia (ACM MM 2014) for her research in facial emotion recognition. The paper, "Say Cheese vs. Smile: Reducing Speech-Related Variability for Facial Emotion Recognition," was co-authored by her advisor, Prof. Emily Mower Provost. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Mower Provost, Emily  Signal and Image Processing   Women in Computing  

Winter 2015: Advanced Topics in Analog ICs

Course No.: EECS 598-005
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: David Wentzloff and Michael Flynn
Prerequisites: EECS 413 and co-requisite EECS 522

Course Description:
This course will cover design and analysis of advanced analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits, beyond what is covered in EECS 511 and EECS 522. [More Info]

Winter 2015: Network Information Theory

Course No.: EECS 598-006
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Sandeep Pradhan
Prerequisites: EECS 501 or equivalent

Course Description:
This course aims to develop a set of mathematical tools to study communication problems that arise in networks. A strong emphasis will be put on obtaining an intuitive framework to think about these problems. This course is aimed at graduate students working in the areas of electrical engineering, computer science, statistics, and mathematics. [More Info]

Student Spotlight: Kyusang Lee: A Leader in Flexible Solar Cell Technology

Kyusang Lee is on the leading edge of flexible electronics. Conducting research under Prof. Stephen Forrest, Kyusang developed an innovative new fabrication technique using an inorganic III/V material (ie, GaAs) to build lightweight, flexible devices not possible with conventional silicon. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Graduate Students  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Prof. Kamal Sarabandi Elected President of IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society

Kamal Sarabandi, Rufus S. Teesdale Professor of Engineering, has been elected president of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS). He will begin his two-year term January 1, 2015. The fields of interest of the GRS Society are the theory, concepts, and techniques of science and engineering as they apply to the remote sensing of the earth, oceans, atmosphere, and space, as well as the processing, interpretation and dissemination of this information. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

EECS Alums are Flying High with Drone Startup Skyspecs

SkySpecs, the startup that develops and produces autonomous aerial vehicles for commercial and industrial use, continues to grow within the drone industry. The founders recently won the first place prize of $500,000 in the Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition and joined a four-month accelerator program in New York City. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Alumni  Autonomous Vehicles   

Michigan and Prof. Forrest awarded photovoltaics R&D award from the U.S. Dept. of Energy SunShot Initiative

U-M was selected as part of the U.S. Dept. of Energy SunShot's "Next Generation Photovoltaics 3" program and was the only project awarded for organic photovoltaic ("OPV") research and development. Prof. Stephen Forrest said he very pleased to be able to continue his work on the SunShot Initiative. Forrest has achieved significant results in the area of organic photovoltaics, and believes they have the potential to redefine the cost structure of the solar industry and introduce solar power to untapped applications." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Energy  Forrest, Stephen  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

New Approaches to Solar Cell Technology Featured in Sustainability Hour (Profs. Rand and Guo)

Professors Stephen Rand and Jay Guo delivered presentations for the November Meeting of the North Campus Sustainability Hour on the topic of solar energy and its future. The professors addressed two very different problems the industry faces with current technology. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Energy  Guo, L. Jay  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Rand, Stephen  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

Yang Liu Receives Best Applications Paper Award for Cyber Security Research in Phishing

Yang Liu, Ph.D Candidate in Electrical Engineering:Systems, earned a Best Applications Paper Award from the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Data Science and Advanced Analytics (DSAA2014) for his recent research on phishing. His paper detailed his use of big data analysis to solve a major problem of cyber security [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Big Data  Communications  Graduate Students  Liu, Mingyan  Security (Computing)  

Winter 2015: Performance Systems: Mobile Phones as Musical Instruments

Course No.: EECS 498-003 and EECS 598-003
Credit Hours: 3 or 4 credits
Instructor: Georg Essl
Prerequisites: EECS 493 or graduate standing or permission of instructor

Course Description:
In this course, you will design your own mobile phone musical instruments, write your own pieces for this new genre, and develop mobile music performance practice in a unique blend of music performance and engineering. [More Info]

Winter 2015: Embedded Systems: An Application-Centered Approach

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Robert Dick
Prerequisites: EECS 311 or 312 or 373 or 482 or equivalent or permission of instructor

Course Description:
Embedded systems are computers within other devices such as wearable devices, automobiles, sensor networks, and medical devices. The focus of this course is to give students an understanding of the process of going from an idea to a product or research finding in the field of embedded systems. [More Info]

Prof. Robert Dick to Apply Cyber Information to Air Quality Management

Prof. Robert Dick, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and specialist in embedded systems, received a CyberSEES grant to to study the impact of weather and human activity on production of, and exposure to, ozone and other air pollutants. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Dick, Robert  Embedded Computing and Systems  Environment  

Scott Hanson Receives 2014 Arbor Networks Ph.D. Research Impact Award

Scott Hanson (BSE MSE PhD EE '04 '06 '09) has been selected to receive the 2014 Arbor Networks Ph.D. Research Impact Award. Dr. Hanson is the co-founder, Chief Technology Officer and Vice President of Engineering of Ambiq Micro, a startup semiconductor company that has big plans to lead the low-power revolution in electronics by powering the Internet of Things. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Alumni  Internet of Things  

Winter 2015: Probabilistic Graphical Models for Vision and Beyond

Course No.: EECS 598-004
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Jason Corso
Prerequisites: EECS 501 or graduate-level proficiency with probability and statistics

Course Description:
This course will cover probabilistic graphical models in detail starting from the basics and pushing through contemporary results. There will be an emphasis on driving problem formulations from computer vision but our coverage will be broad; connections to other application areas will be discussed when plausible. [More Info]

Winter 2015: Grid Integration of Alternative Energy Sources

Course No.: EECS 498-002
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Johanna Mathieu
Prerequisites: EECS 215 or EECS 314 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will present a variety of alternative energy sources, along with energy processing technologies that are required for power system connection. Topics will be covered at a level suited to establish a broad understanding of the various technologies, and of the associate system implications. [More Info]

Winter 2015: Control of Discrete Event Systems

Course No.: EECS 598-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Stephane Lafortune
Prerequisites: EECS 566 or EECS 598-005 in Fall 2013 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will cover advanced topics on control of discrete event systems, with focus on the following topics: distributed and decentralized control architectures; synthesis methodologies for controllers under safety and liveness properties; comparison of synthesis techniques for specifications described by automata and by temporal logics; joint control and diagnosis problems for fault-tolerant control; discussion of relevant case studies. [More Info]

Winter 2015: Information Retrieval and Web Search

Course No.: EECS 498-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Rada Mihalcea
Prerequisites: EECS 281

Course Description:
This course will cover traditional material, as well as recent advances in Information Retrieval (IR), the study of indexing, processing, querying, and classifying data. [More Info]

Prof. Johanna Mathieu Working to Bring Power from Sustainable Sources to Your Home

ECE Prof. Johanna Mathieu received a grant under the NSF Cyber-Innovation for Sustainability Science and Engineering program to pursue "Data-driven approaches to managing uncertain load control in sustainable power systems." She is working on the problem of how best to integrate wind and solar power into the nation's established electrical grid system. The research may one day impact the nation's energy policy as it attempts to balance the cost of energy with the environmental impact of generating that energy. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grid  Mathieu, Johanna  Power & Energy  Wind Technology  

Prof. Raj Nadakuditi Awarded DARPA Young Faculty Award for Research that could Help Reveal the Brains Secrets

Raj Nadakuditi, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, has received a 2014 DARPA Young Faculty Award for his research project, "Fundamental limits of eigen-wavefront based imaging through highly scattering random media." His research will impact the ability to investigate the structure of brain circuits through the use of optical imaging techniques. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Brain  Nadakuditi, Rajesh Rao  Signal and Image Processing   

Prof. Becky Peterson Awarded DARPA Young Faculty Award to Investigate New Materials for Power Semiconductor Devices

Becky Peterson, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was recently awarded a 2014 DARPA Young Faculty Award for her research project, "Amorphous Oxide Thin Film Transistors for Switched-Mode Power Supplies." Such power supplies could potentially be used in a wide variety of wireless sensing and actuation systems, including those that deal with security and monitoring of the environment and medical conditions. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Prof. Necmiye Ozay Awarded DARPA Young Faculty Award for Research in Cyber and Physical Systems

Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, has received a 2014 DARPA Young Faculty Award for her research project, Dynamics-based information extraction: a hybrid systems approach." Her research will impact the safety and security of cyber and physical systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Cyber-physical systems  Diversity and Outreach  Ozay, Necmiye  

Life, Engineered: How Lynn Conway Reinvented Her World and Ours

Emerita professor Lynn Conway engineered her life from the start and reinvented the computer chip -- without her, our cell phones wouldn't be possible. But she also pioneered a potentially harder road, becoming among the first transgender woman in engineering. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  

Students host event inspired by study abroad experience

Amid the rushing of students, voter registration representatives and preachers, 13 students stood on the Diag Friday with baskets of food to bring a piece of their study abroad in India back to Ann Arbor. They learned the concept of "langar," which is a shared meal that emphasizes equality, on the trip organized by ECE Prof. Jasprit Singh. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Singh, Jasprit  

Mapping the brain with lasers

Individual parts of the brain can be activated and de-activated by shining light on the neurons, and researchers are using this ability to chart how different areas of the brain function. To zoom in on individual neuron circuits within the brain, more precise light sources are needed. ECE professor Euisik Yoon is leading a team that will design and build these new light sources with a variety of lasers. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Brain  Health  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Yoon, Euisik  

Long-Lived Blue OLED Could Lead to Better Displays

Many displays in smartphones and televisions generate red and green light with phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes but use more energy-hungry fluorescent devices for blue. That's because blue PHOLEDs only last for a couple of days. Now Prof. Stephen Forrest and his group have found a way to extend the lifetime of blue PHOLEDs by a factor of 10, bringing them much closer to commercial use. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Displays  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

These Energy-Saving, Batteryless Chips Could Soon Power The Internet Of Things

The story focuses on how the new Michigan/UVa start-up company, PsiKick, is going to help enable the Internet of Things thanks to their very low power processing, called subthreshold processing. Also mentioned is the Michigan startup, Ambiq Micro, which has also entered the low power revolution. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Internet of Things  Technology Transfer  Wentzloff, David  

Blue LED breakthrough for efficient electronics

In a step that could lead to longer battery life in smartphones and lower power consumption for large-screen televisions, Prof. Stephen Forrest and his team have extended the lifetime of blue organic light emitting diodes by a factor of 10. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Khalil Najafi to Receive 2015 IEEE Daniel E. Noble Award for Emerging Technologies

Khalil Najafi, Schlumberger Professor of Engineering and ECE Chair, was selected to receive the 2015 IEEE Daniel E. Noble Award for Emerging Technologies, "For leadership in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), technologies, and devices and for seminal contributions to inertial devices and hermetic wafer-level packaging." The IEEE Daniel E. Noble award is one of IEEE's Technical Field Awards, which are among the highest awards given by IEEE. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Najafi, Khalil  

Prof. Pallab Bhattacharya To Receive 2015 IEEE David Sarnoff Award

Pallab Bhattacharya, Charles M. Vest Distinguished University Professor and James R. Mellor Professor of Engineering, was selected to receive the 2015 IEEE David Sarnoff Award, "For contributions to near-infrared and visible quantum dot lasers." The IEEE David Sarnoff award is one of IEEE's Technical Field Awards, which are among the highest awards given by IEEE. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  

Student Spotlight: Tal Nagourney - Exploring navigation

ECE graduate student Tal Najourney is exploring new frontiers in navigation technology. He and others in the group are trying to build a navigation device that doesnt need any external frame of reference, meaning the gyroscope is meant to guide navigation devices without using GPS. He worked with a professional glass blower to hone his technique. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  GPS  Graduate Students  MEMS and Microsystems  Najafi, Khalil  

Fighting lung cancer with faster image processing

A new $1.9 million research program led by Prof. Jeff Fessler seeks to make low-dose computed tomography scans a viable screening technique by speeding up the image reconstruction from half an hour or more to just five minutes.The advance could be particularly important for fighting lung cancers, as symptoms often appear too late for effective treatment. Prof. Thomas Wenisch is collaborating on the project. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Medical Imaging  Medical diagnosis  Signal and Image Processing   Wenisch, Thomas  

Prof. Ted Norris Receives Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award

Prof. Norris was recognized for his consistently outstanding achievements in scholarly research, sustained high quality teaching and mentoring of students and junior colleagues, and for his distinguished service to the University and professional community. He will receive the award at a special ceremony October 6, 2014. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Norris, Theodore B.  

Prof. Stephen Forrest a Most Influential Scientist

Prof. Stephen Forrest was included in a recent Thompson Reuters publication as one of the most influential scientific minds in the world for 2014. The basis for inclusion was the number of times his publications were cited by his peers in the literature between 2002-2012. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  

Cheng Zhang Receives Optical Sciences Scholarship

ECE graduate student Cheng Zhang received the 2014 Michael Pate Optical Sciences Memorial Scholarship. Cheng works with Professor L. Jay Guo on research projects in the field of micro/nano-scale optical device physics and fabrication. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Kyu-Tae Lee Wins Best Poster Award for Colorful Solar Cells

ECE graduate student Kyu-Tae Lee received a Best Poster Award at the 40th Annual Michigan AVS Symposium. His poster described the creation of solar cell device structures that enable attractive multi-colored solar cells that can be used on windows and other interior and exterior surfaces. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Guo, L. Jay  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Small Satellite Wins Big

ECE graduate student Iverson Bell took home a check for $7,500 for his second place prize in the 28th Annual AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites. Bell built an electrodynamic tether for space applications. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Diversity and Outreach  Gilchrist, Brian E.  Graduate Students  Space technology  

Fall 2014: Foundations of Computer Vision

Course No.: EECS 598-008
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Jason Corso
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Course Description:
Computer Vision seeks to extract useful information from images. This course begins the fundamentals of image formation and then organizes the remaining material according to the class of information to be extracted. The course has been designed to present an introduction to computer vision targeted to graduate students. The course will balance theory and application both in lectures and assignments. [More Info]

Fall 2014: Practical Machine Learning

Course No.: EECS 598-007
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Jenna Wiens
Prerequisites: EECS 445 or EECS 545 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
In this seminar class we will cover the basics of practical machine learning and data mining while focusing on real-world applications. We will read and critique recent applied ML work in the fields of sports analytics, data-driven medicine, finance, and personalized education. At the same time, we will review a complementary set of papers to help guide our discussion in terms of the pragmatic aspects of ML e.g., feature engineering, cross-validation, and performance measures. The overall goal of the class is for students to gain a deeper understanding of the practical challenges and pitfalls associated with applying machine learning tools and techniques in a real-world setting.

Fall 2014: Probabilistic Analysis of Large Scale Systems

Course No.: EECS 598-006
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Vijay Subramanian
Prerequisites: EECS 501 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will focus on emerging topics in epidemics and diffusions, queueing systems, analysis of randomized algorithms, Bayesian information cascades, network analysis and random graphs. [More Info]

Fall 2014: Laser Plasma Diagnostics

Course No.: EECS 598-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Louise Willingale
Prerequisites: EECS 537 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will cover the techniques used for creating, characterizing and timing high power laser pulses from megajoule-nanosecond pulses to relativistic-intensity femtosecond pulses. [More Info]

Sensors in the Soil (video)

Soil moisture information is just as important to NASA engineers as it is to local farmers. For example, this data is used to monitor climate patterns and predict landslides. Prof. Mingyan Liu is working on a system that will make collecting and analyzing this data more accurate. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Communications  Environment  Liu, Mingyan  Sensors  

MABEL at the Chicago Field Museum

MABEL, the record-breaking bipedal robot who was taught to walk and run by Prof. Jessy Grizzle and his team, has arrived at the Chicago Field Museum, where she will part of the biomechanics exhibit through January 2015. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Solving the Big Data Dilemma

Prof. Laura Balzano talks about how to get the best results from big collections of data. Science, healthcare, economics, infrastructure and government could be completely changed by effectively using big data. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Balzano, Laura  Big Data  Environment  Health  Information Technology  Signal and Image Processing   

Four New Faculty Join ECE in Fall 2014

ECE is delighted to welcome three outstanding new faculty members to Michigan. These faculty broaden and deepen ECE's areas of expertise in computer vision, communications and information theory, environmental and remote sensing, and laser-plasma interactions. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Communications  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Information Technology  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Plasma Science and Engineering   Subramanian, Vijay  Willingale, Louise  

New graphene sensor technology for personal and environmental health

A new wearable vapor sensor could one day offer continuous disease monitoring for patients with diabetes, high blood pressure, anemia or lung disease. The new sensor, which can detect airborne chemicals either exhaled or released through the skin, would likely be the first wearable to pick up a broad array of chemical, rather than physical, attributes. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Environment  Medical diagnosis  Sensors  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Wearable electronics  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Student Spotlight: Patrick Sheridan - Memristors and the Brain

Patrick is at the frontier of developing memristor devices for neuromorphic computing as a member of Prof. Wei Lus nanoelectronics research group. Taking inspiration from the brain, we look at how neurons are interconnected and share signals, and then we try to replicate that with our memristive devices, said Patrick, Ph.D. candidate in electrical engineering. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lu, Wei  

Low-Power Laser Could Speed CPUs

Prof. Bhattacharya's breakthrough room-temperature polariton laser enables commercialization of the technology. One potential application discussed by the author is to enable on-chip optical interconnects. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Electronic devices  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Optoelectronics: A practical polariton laser

In this article, the author describes the importance of Prof. Bhattacharya's room-temperature, eletrically injected polariton laser, stating that it, "represents an important step towards the practical implementation of polaritonic light sources. In many ways, the first report of a semiconductor laser device based on BoseEinstein condensation that is pumped electrically at room temperature opens a new era in optoelectronics. It may not be long before polaritonic devices start to claim their share of the optoelectronics market, just as double heterostructure devices did 40 years ago." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Optoelectronics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Alumni Spotlight: Peter Tchoryk - An Entrepreneurial CEO

Peter Tchoryk (MSE EE 1994) is CEO of Michigan Aerospace Corporation (MAC), and co-founder of Springmatter and OptoAtmospherics. Peter wants to invest in entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial activities dedicated to improving the world. His work at MAC and especially his activities in Springmatter help him do that. [Full Story]

3 ECE Companies on Silicon 60 List

EE Times announced their Silicon 60, the top 60 startup companies it is worth watching, and three of those companies were co-founded by ECE faculty. Ambiq Micro, Inc. (David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester); Crossbar Inc. (Wei Lu); and PsiKick Inc. (David Wentzloff) are leading the way in ultra-low-power chip design, pioneering computer memory, and ultra-low power wireless sensor platforms for the Internet of Things. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Lu, Wei  Sylvester, Dennis  Technology Transfer  Wentzloff, David  

ECE pays well!

You majored in engineering? Great decision! Electrical and/or Computer Engineering? Even better! According to a study by USA Today, Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering are among the highest paying college majors. There are LOTS of jobs for ECE students, and you can work in virtually any field of interest. [Full Story]

Shrinking the size of optical systems, exponentially

ECE researchers have developed a way to exponentially shrink the size of a system typically needed to control the polarization of light, while maintaining the high level of performance needed for numerous optical applications such as color displays, microscopy and photography. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Graduate Students  Grbic, Anthony  Guo, L. Jay  LNF  Metamaterials  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Jessy Grizzle Named Elmer G. Gilbert Distinguished University Professor

Jessy Grizzle has been named the Elmer G. Gilbert Distinguished University Professor of Engineering. Prof. Grizzle is an internationally renowned researcher in the area of control systems. He has broken new ground in the application of control theory to bipedal robots and environmentally friendly automobiles. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

A Batteryless Sensor Chip for the Internet of Things

MIT Technology Review described the chips being made by PsiKick, a company co-founded by Prof. David Wentzloff. These low-power chips are the key to the promise of the Internet of Things. Their chip design has been tested in a wearable EKG monitor that runs entirely on body heat. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Technology Transfer  Wearable electronics  Wentzloff, David  

Gurkan Gok Receives Paper Award for Making Better Antenna Beams

Gurkan Gok (PhD, EE 2014, exp) won Third Place in the Student Paper Competition at the 2014 IEEE Int. Symposium on Antennas and Propagation for his paper that describes an antenna beam former that he developed using metamaterials. The design strategy provides new opportunities in smart antenna development. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics  Graduate Students  Grbic, Anthony  

US Researchers Develop Room Temperature Polariton Laser

Device could be future optical replacement for on-chip wires. Scientists from the University of Michigan (Prof. Bhattacharya) and Intel Corporation in the US have demonstrated what appears to be the first electrically powered, room-temperature polariton laser. The device, based on a GaN-based microcavity diode, could advance efforts to replace on-chip wire connections with lasers, leading to smaller and more powerful electronics, say the researchers. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Electronic devices  

2014 Promotions of our Faculty

Congratulations to the following faculty who received promotions this year: Valeria Bertacco, Jason Flinn, Satish Narayanasamy, Edwin Olson, Mina Rais-Zadeh, and Zhaohui Zhong. Keep up the great work! [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Flinn, Jason  Narayanasamy, Satish  Olson, Edwin  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Jiangfeng Wu Receives Best Paper Award for Research in Safe Fracking

Jiangfeng Wu, graduate student in electrical engineering, received the Mikio Takagi Student Prize for his research in designing and building an antenna that can better determine the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The Mikio Takagi Student Prize is given to the best of the top three Student Prize Paper Awards granted at the IEEE Int. Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Environment  Graduate Students  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Dipak Sengupta (1931-2014): In Memoriam

Dr. Dipak L. Sengupta, former research scientist and treasured friend of the department, passed away Monday, July 21, 2014 at the age of 83. Dr. Sengupta came to the office nearly every day, including Saturday mornings. Faculty and staff alike will miss his cheerful and gentle presence in the building. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Alumni Explore Lots of EECS-related Engineering with Their Kids

Three hundred and eighty alumni and children visited North Campus June 26 and 27 as part of the Xplore Engineering summer camp, with many of the activities related to or hosted by EECS. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  

Amazon Lures Google Glass Creator (Babak Parviz)

Babak Parviz (MSE, PhD EE), the man who led Google's development of wearable technology project Glass, is moving to rival Amazon.com. Babak posted a photo of the Amazon logo on his social account with the short comment, status: super excited. (photo by Doug Plummer) [Full Story]

Student Spotlight: Gyouho Kim - A big talent for creating tiny devices

Gyouho Kim is completing his thesis in electrical engineering in the area of ultra-low power VLSI design. He is designing a millimeter-scale visual system that is complete with optics, processing capability and battery. Solar cells are used to harvest the minuscule amount of energy needed to operate. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Graduate Students  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Sylvester, Dennis  

Wakefield and Kieras Win Best Paper Award at ICAD 2014

Profs. Gregory Wakefield and David Kieras, along with three coauthors from the Air Force Research Laboratory at the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, received the Best Paper Award at the 20th International Conference on Auditory Display for EPIC Modeling of a Two-Talker CRM Listening Task. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Acoustic Processing  Kieras, David  Wakefield, Gregory H.  

Thomas Frost Receives Best Paper Award for Achieving a HQ QD Red Laser

Thomas Frost received a Best Paper Award for achieving a high quality quantum dot red laser using novel materials. Lasers emitting in the 600nm wavelength range have important applications in medicine, optical information processing, plastic fiber communication systems, optical storage, and full color laser displays and laser projectors. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Graduate Students  LNF  Lasers  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Eric Michielssen Receives Distinguished Educator Award

Eric Michielssen, Professor of EECS, Associate Vice President for Advanced Research Computing, and Director of the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering, has been awarded the 2014 IEEE Antenna and Propagation Society Chen-To Tai Distinguished Educator Award, "In recognition of being an outstanding educator, mentor and role model for the next generation of faculty members." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Michielssen, Eric  

Student Spotlight: Saniya Deshpande - taking it one photon at a time

Saniya Desphande is a PhD candidate conducting research in nanowire and quantum-dot based quantum light sources, LEDs and laser. One specific area of research in which she's already made a big impact is in quantum communications and quantum cryptography. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Tailor-made surface swaps light polarization

A new approach to manipulating light using two-dimensional metamaterials called metasurfaces offers a compact alternative to traditional methods. The researchers believe the basic geometry of cascading patterned metallic sheets can provide the basis for cleverly designing and fabricating a broad range of optical devices, including symmetric circular polarizers, polarization rotators, and asymmetric linear polarizers. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Grbic, Anthony  Guo, L. Jay  Metamaterials  

Metal particles in memristors do not stay put

In work that unmasks some of the magic behind memristors and RRAM, cutting-edge computer components that combine logic and memory functions, researchers have shown that the metal particles in memristors don't stay put as previously thought. The findings have broad implications for the semiconductor industry and beyond. They show, for the first time, exactly how some memristors remember. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Cockroaches rule! And heres why

Cockroaches actually have much to teach in the realm of robust systems - something we want in our technology. The article references a recent video featuring Prof. Shai Revzen's work in applying cockroach lessons to robotics. [Full Story]

New Research Program to Investigate Optical Energy Conversion

ECE is home to a new major research program that aims to provide a better understanding of phenomena driven by the magnetic field component of light. A key long-term goal of this five-year, $7.5M MURI, called the Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics (DYNAMO), is to investigate the prospects for direct conversion of light to electricity without the thermodynamic losses typical of photovoltaic (solar cell) technology. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Energy  Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

A better light bulb

Already a key lighting material for smart phones, a new approach to building phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) will make them useful even for general lighting. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Energy  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Lighting  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Student Spotlight: Brian Buss - Controlling MARLO

Brian Buss arrived as a graduate student at Michigan in 2009, wanting to do something in Systems. He first applied his skills to insulin dosing for glucose regulation, and then switched to robotics. He is now working on the bipedal robot known as MARLO. He believes we will one day see bipedal robots like MARLO deployed in situations such as wilderness search and rescue, fire fighting and disaster response. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Grizzle, Jessy  

MEMS Research by Muzhi Wang Recognized at IMS 2014

ECE graduate student Muzhi Wang received a best student paper award, honorable mention, at the 2014 IEEE International Microwave Symposium (IMS2014) for his research in RF MEMS switches for high-power RF applications. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  MEMS and Microsystems  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  

CROSSBAR Closes Series C Funding of $25M; Oversubscribed Round Validates Companys Readiness to Scale

Crossbar, Inc., a start-up company pioneering Resistive RAM (RRAM) technology, today announced it has completed a $25 million Series C funding in an oversubscribed round. The company was co-founded by Prof. Wei Lu, who also acts as Chief Scientist. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Entrepreneurship  Lu, Wei  

Semitransparent PV cells go designer

Prof. Jay Guo and his team have engineered what are believed to be the first semitransparent, colored photovoltaic cells. Broadening the use of solar power while maintaining aesthetic appeal for all kinds of environments, this technology could become energy-harvesting billboards on the sides of buildings, solar window shades in our homes and even stained glass, Guo said. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Solar Cell Technology  

Designing robots that assemble and adapt

What happens when you send a rolling robot out for a mission, and it turns out to need legs instead? In this video, Shai Revzen, assistant professor of ECE, describes how his team is working to create "self-assembling" robots that can build themselves into any form required. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Computer Vision  

US students learn langar lessons from Golden Temple

Prof. Jasprit Singh arranged for U-M students to visit the Golden Temple in India to learn the concept of "langar," or community kitchen. They are learning how volunteers work together to prepare meals for 60,000 people everyday, the power that draws participants who serve and were served, the role played by merchants and farmers in the 'langar' and 'daswandh' (donating 10% of earnings). [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Singh, Jasprit  

Student Spotlight: Thomas Frost - First generation college grad goes all the way

Thomas Frost was the first person in his family to go to college, and he's far surpassing that goal as he works on his dissertation in the field of solid-state optoelectronics. He is part of the team working with Prof. Pallab Bhattacharya that recently developed the first room-temperature polariton laser fueled by electrical current as opposed to light. This work could advance efforts to put lasers on computer circuits, leading to smaller and more powerful electronics. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

A new way to make laser-like beams using 250x less power

With precarious particles called polaritons that straddle the worlds of light and matter, ECE researchers have demonstrated a new, practical and potentially more efficient way to make a coherent laser-like beam. They have made what's believed to be the first room-temperature polariton laser that is fueled by electrical current as opposed to light. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  CPHOM  LNF  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Chia-Hsiang Chen Awarded Intel PhD Fellowship

Chia-Hsiang Chen, a Ph.D. candidate in Electrical Engineering, has been selected to receive a prestigious Intel Corporation Ph.D. Fellowship. His research focuses on designing low-power and error-resilient circuit techniques for communication and computing devices such as cell phones, tablets, and sensors [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Alumni Spotlight: Kathryn Clay, A Policy Leader in the Natural Gas Revolution

Dr. Kathryn Clay believes, The only way to make real progress for the country is to find the common ground upon which we can move forward to advance everyones interests. A natural coalition builder, Kathryn implements this philosophy in her current job as Vice President of Policy Strategy at the American Gas Association (AGA), and its as helpful now as it was during her career on Capitol Hill where she influenced key energy policy. [Full Story]

Student Spotlight: Nick Asendorf - Matrix Musician

Nick conducts research in the area of machine learning and statistical signal processing under the guidance of Prof. Raj Nadakuditi. He has been employing random matrix theory to create new algorithms that aim to improve multi-modal correlation analysis. He has led the ECE Graduate Student Council and plays the carillon on North Campus. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Parinaz Naghizadeh, Researcher in Economic Network Security, is Named a Barbour Scholar

Parinaz Naghizadeh, a graduate student in electrical engineering, has been named a 2014 Barbour Scholar. She is conducting research in the general area of computer and network security, and more specifically, combining communications with economics to assess the security level of a network and then apply that data to design cyber-insurance contracts. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Communications  Graduate Students  Liu, Mingyan  Networks and Networking  Security (Computing)  

Small, Simple Terahertz Detector Converts The Pulses To Sound

"Terahertz waves, which are non-ionizing and can penetrate fabrics and body tissue, could be used to reveal hidden weapons and spot skin cancer and tooth decay. But they are notoriously difficult to detect. Engineers at the University of Michigan have invented a simple new way to sense them." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Terahertz Technology  

Business Adapts to a New Style of Computer

"For more than a decade technologists have predicted and argued about the onslaught of these ubiquitous devices [Internet of Things]. 'There is lot of quibbling about what to call it, but theres little doubt that were seeing the inklings of a new class of computer,' says David Blaauw, who leads a lab at the University of Michigan that makes functioning computers no bigger than a typed letter o." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Internet of Things  

Silicon Valley to Get a Cellular Network, Just for Things

Prof. David Blaauw comments on What's Next - which in this article means the Internet of Things, and the need for a wireless network for "things" rather than person-to-person communication. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Internet of Things  

Terahertz Detectors Go Handheld

"Today terahertz detectors are commonplace in airports, where you enter a glass-walled chamber while the detector swings around you, snooping under your clothes for weapons. Now researchers have found a way to downsize the detector portion of those machines into chip-sized devices." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Terahertz Technology  

T-ray converts light to sound for weapons detection, medical imaging

A research team led by Profs. Jay Guo and Ted Norris created a device that turns terahertz waves (T-rays) into ultrasound, which can then be detected by a highly sensitive acoustic sensor. Applications for T-rays include weapons detection, medical imaging, and astronomy. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  CPHOM  Guo, L. Jay  Medical Imaging  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Security (national and personal safety)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Terahertz Technology  

Student teams earn prizes for their ADC circuit designs in EECS 511

Students in the graduate level course, Integrated Analog/Digital Interface Circuits (EECS 511), taught by Prof. Michael Flynn, competed for cash prizes while presenting their final design projects thanks to the support of Analog Devices, Inc. Two winning projects and teams were determined by an expert panel at Analog Devices. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Flynn, Michael  

Research in Machine Learning earns Notable Paper Award at AISTATS 2014

Prof. Clay Scott received a Notable Paper Award at the 2014 Int. Conf. on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics for his research in the area of machine learning. The theoretical research has applications in big data problems such as crowd sourcing, topic modeling, and nuclear particle classification. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Big Data  Machine Learning  Scott, Clayton D.  Signal and Image Processing   

Leaders in Ultra Low Power Circuits and Systems Presenting at VLSI Circuits Symposium

Michigan faculty and students will present seven papers at the 2014 Symposium on VLSI Circuits, a number that exceeds any other academic institution or company. The seven papers range from a millimeter-scale wireless imaging system, to a chip that can decipher an image in a manner similar to the human brain, to continued optimization of the circuits we use every day, as well as circuits that will fuel the future Internet of Things. One of the papers, Low Power Battery Supervisory Circuit with Adaptive Battery Health Monitor, has been selected as a Symposium Technical Highlight. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Flynn, Michael  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Millimeter-scale Computing  Mobile Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Zhang, Zhengya  

Students to Use IBM Watson Cognitive Computing System in Class

Students in Dr. David Chesney's course this fall will use IBM's Jeopardy-winning Watson system to develop apps that help children with special needs. This opportunity arose following a conversation between Eric Michielssen, Assoc. VP for Advanced Research Computing and EECS Professor, and IBM Watson group VP and computer science alum Mike Rhodin. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Chesney, David  Engineering for the Greater Good  

The Annual Slaying of the Dragon

Students were hungry for this years St. Georges Day Feast. It happens every year the day before the last day of classes a day when the faculty serve the students, and battle the dragons! [Full Story]

Award-Winning EECS Student Instructors

The EECS Department held its annual Graduate Student Instructor (GSI) / Instructional Aide (IA) Awards Ceremony on May 8 to honor top student instructors and aides for their remarkable service. According to the student comments, they are "awesome!" [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Student Spotlight: Luis Gomez - An Expert in Computational Electromagnetics and Teaching

Luis Gomez investigates transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and computational electromagnetics under Prof. Eric Michielssen. He has balanced his research with teaching and recently received an Outstanding GSI Award from the department. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Why Join a Startup?

Abdur Chowdhury, co-founder and CEO of Pushd, founder of an elementary school focused on STEM education, and former Chief Scientist of Twitter, talks about why starting or joining a startup might be the best thing for a newly graduated student. Chowdhury has hired 100s of engineers. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship  

The Car Doctor Talks to Prof. Freudenberg

Listen to the radio broadcast of Prof. Jim Freudenberg talking with Ron Ananian, The Car Doctor, about software complexity in cars. (start at the 19 minute mark of the May 3 broadcast) [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Freudenberg, James S.  Software Systems  

Eye of the Tiger: U.S. Army Eyes Night Vision Contact Lenses

"Were talking featherweight futuristic night vision awesomeness here, Iron Man soldier suit style, without the hulking suit. They seem almost as cool as Googles blood glucose-level tracking contacts." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graphene  Sensors  

Hao Sun Earns 3 Paper Awards for Medical Imaging Research

Hao Sun, a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering:Systems program, will receive 3 paper awards at the 2014 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) meeting. held May 10-16 in Milan, Italy, for his research in the area of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Medical Imaging  Signal and Image Processing   

Students earn prizes for improving image processing in EECS 556

Two teams earned prizes in the graduate level course, EECS 556: Image Processing, thanks to the sponsorship of KLA-Tencor. The course, taught by Prof. Jeff Fessler, covers the theory and application of digital image processing, which has applications in biomedical images, time-varying imagery, robotics, and optics. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Signal and Image Processing   

Powering the Internet of Things (video)

Prof. David Wentzloff describes the future Internet of Things, a world that he and his colleagues in the Michigan Integrated Circuits Laboratory are enabling with their ultra low power circuits and systems. These sensing systems can detect air quality, bodily health, and whether you forgot to turn off your stove and send that information to your phone. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Sensors  Wentzloff, David  

Thank Lynn Conway for your Cell Phone

Emerita professor Lynn Conway, the hidden hand in the 1980s microchip design revolution, has been named a fellow at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA for her work in developing and disseminating new methods of integrated circuit design. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  

Nicholas Clift Named 2014 Graduate Student of the Year

Nick Clift, a master's student in electrical engineering, was named Graduate Student of the Year, which is one of the Michigan Difference Student Leadership Awards sponsored by the Student Life Office. He co-founded Own It, and is a passionate force for social justice and ethical living. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Jason Heebl Receives NDSEG Fellowship

Jason Heebl, a graduate student in the electrical engineering program, was awarded a three-year National Defense Science and Engineering (NDSEG) Fellowship to pursue his doctoral degree in the area of RF metamaterials and wireless power applications. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Grbic, Anthony  

EECS Students Attend National NSBE Convention - Come Back Psyched

Five students attended the 2014 Annual Convention of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), and came back excited about their career and newly connected to many professionals in the field. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Undergraduate Students  

gEECS Hosts High School Students at {Girls Code}

Girls in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (gEECS) hosted twenty 9th - 12th grade girls from across southeast Michigan for {Girls Code}, an Arduino Workshop at Michigan. Arduino is an open-source electronics prototyping hardware and software platform that can be used to create interactive objects or environments. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Undergraduate Students  

Mina Rais-Zadeh Receives 2014 ONR Young Investigator Program (YIP) Award

Prof. Mina Rais-Zadeh received a 2014 Young Investigator Award from the Office of Naval Research (ONR) for her research project, Acoustic Phonons and Their Interactions with Electrons in Gallium Nitride Ultra-fast Ultra-scaled Resonators. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  MEMS and Microsystems  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

PsiKicks batteryless sensors poised for coming Internet of Things

Infrared Sensor Could Lead to Night Vision Contact Lenses (with video)

Halderman and Lafortune Join TerraSwarm Research Center

Two EECS faculty with expertise in Privacy and Security, J. Alex Halderman and Stephane Lafortune, will join the TerraSwarm Research Center in May. TerraSwarm addresses the huge potential, as well as the risks, of pervasive integration of smart, networked sensors and actuators into the connected world. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lafortune, Stephane  Security (Computing)  

Alumni Spotlight: Steve Mollenkopf, New CEO of Qualcomm

Steve Mollenkopf (MSE EE '93) was recently named CEO of Qualcomm. During his 20 years at Qualcomm, he helped Qualcomm became the worlds largest mobile chipset supplier and the global leader in LTE technolog. Qualcomm powers the majority of 3G and 4G devices commercially available today. [Full Story]

Isabel Martin Received CoE Dist. Leadership Award

Isabel Martin received a 2014 CoE Distinguished Leadership Award for her outstanding leadership and service to the College and community. Her leadership activities include serving as President of the Mars Rover team and founder of the Robotic Exploration of Space Team. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Undergraduate Students  

SWE Hosts G.R.E.A.T. Day for Girls

The Society of Women Engineers Student Section at the University of Michigan held its second annual G.R.E.A.T Day (Girls Research Engineering And Technology) on April 12th for 240 students and parents from states across the Midwest. CS undergraduate Ariana Mirian was a co-chair for the event. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Undergraduate Students  

Hands-On Robotics (video)

Prof. Shai Revzen presents his Hands-On Robotics course (EECS 498). Watch the students in action as he describes: teaching philosophy, what makes for a great team, how to enhance collaboration across teams, even unexpected ways to get a great grade (wackiness allowed). [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  

Christopher Boyd Awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

ECE graduate student Christopher Boyd has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to support his research in the area of MEMS inertial sensors. He is developing new control architectures for these sensors, including rate-integrating gyroscopes and resonant accelerometers. He also designs chips and the algorithms that control them. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Najafi, Khalil  

David Hong Awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

ECE graduate student David Hong has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to support his research. He plans to develop new algorithms that are able to uncover hidden trends in massive real world datasets, ranging from healthcare records to personalized learning records. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Nadakuditi, Rajesh Rao  

Student Spotlight: Christopher Boyd - From Robotics to MEMS Inertial Sensors

EE graduate student Christopher Boyd develops, implements, and tests control systems for MEMS inertial sensors, which are used to detect acceleration, vibration, rotation, tilt, and other attributes related to motion sensing. His goal is to implement these control systems using integrated circuits. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  

The Heritage of Mead & Conway: What Has Remained the Same, What Has Changed, What Was Missed, and What Lies Ahead

This recent Point of View article in the Proceedings of the IEEE reflects upon the impact of the vision and ideas of Prof. Emerita Lynn Conway and her collaborator Carver Mead of Caltech, and the work the two did in ushering in the VLSI revolution. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Conway, Lynn  

Fall 2014: Hands-On Robotics

Course No.: EECS 498-001
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Shai Revzen
Prerequisites: MATH 216 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will cover basic concepts in robotics, such as kinematics, control, programming and design. [More Info]

Mai Le Receives CoE Distinguished Leadership Award

ECE graduate student Mai Le received a 2014 College of Engineering Distinguished Leadership Award for her outstanding leadership and service to the College and community. Mai has served as Community Service Co-chair of the Graduate Society of Women Engineers since arriving at Michigan in 2011, and has created programs for 826michigan. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  

Nicholas Clift receives CoE Distinguished Leadership Award

ECE student Nicholas Clift received a 2014 College of Engineering Distinguished Leadership Award for his outstanding leadership and service to the College and community. Nick received his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering just last year, and has an impressive record of service to the community throughout his years at Michigan, most recently as co-founder of Own It. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Student Spotlight: Mai Le - Finding a Better Way to Diagnose Breast Cancer with MRI

EE:S graduate student Mai Le is applying statistical signal processing techniques to improve breast MRI. Her goal is to be able to determine whether a tumor in breast tissue is malignant or benign through imaging alone. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  

Have New Cars Gone Haywire?

ECE Professor Jim Freudenberg comments on the increasing complexity of automobile electronics with Discovery News. Commenting on this, he said that the complexity of software in a vehicle is daunting, and added that the average Ford in 2010 had 10 million lines of code, more than the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Freudenberg, James S.  

Fall 2014: EECS 598-001 Analysis of Electric Power Distribution Systems and Loads

Course No.: EECS 598-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Johanna Mathieu
Prerequisites: EECS 463 or equivalent

Course Description:
This course covers the fundamentals of electric power distribution systems and electric loads. We will start with an introduction to distribution grids, including their components, typical topologies, and operational strategies. Other topics include power flow in distribution grids and transformers as well as electric loads, including electric load modeling, analysis, and control methodologies. [More Info]

Fall 2014: EECS 598-002 Power Semiconductor Devices

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Becky Peterson
Prerequisites: EECS 320 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
In this course, you will explore semiconductor devices for both discrete and integrated power electronics. Power switches and rectifiers including the power MOSFET, IGBT, HEMT, thyristors, Schottky and pin diodes, as well as emerging power devices will be covered. [More Info]

Student Spotlight: Nathan Roberts - Enabling the Internet of Things

EE student Nathan Roberts gave up a comfortable life working in industry to return to graduate school, and is now conducting research in one of technology's hottest new fields, ultra-low-power circuits for the Internet of Things (IoT). [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Distinguished Academic Achievement Awards

Nick Asendorf, Armin Jam, and Elaine Wah received the 2014 Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Prize for Distinguished Academic Achievement for their achievments in the graduate programs, Electrical Engineering:Systems, Electrical Engineering, and Computer Science and Engineering, respectively. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  

Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors

Hamid-Reza Ossareh and Bryce Wiedenbeck received the 2014 CoE Towner Prize for Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors for their instruction in the courses EECS 560 (Linear Systems Theory) and ENGR 151 (Acc. Intro. to Computers and Programming), respectively. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Guo: Science World - Beautiful Energy

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  

2013-14 Undergraduate Student Awards

Students, parents, and faculty gathered on Friday, March 14, 2014 to celebrate the achievements of EECS students who earned a special award for academic achievement, research, service, or entrepreneurial activities. Khalil Najafi, Chair for Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Marios Papaefthymiou, Chair for Computer Science and Engineering, presented the awards. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Bringing batteryless sensors to market

PsiKick, an ultra-low-power wireless sensor company co-founded by Prof. David Wentzloff, has completed first-round, funding. The financing, led by New Enterprise Associates, will be used to accelerate PsiKick's growth and product development to meet the increasing demand for energy-efficient system-on-a-chip technology. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Wearable electronics  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

Investigating a new material to help you stay connected

Seungku Lee, a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering program, received a U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his dissertation research on BST FARS. These RF devices will permit significant reductions to the size, cost and complexity of current devices that are part of state-of-the-art communication devices such as smartphones and tablets. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Communications  Graduate Students  Mobile Computing  Mortazawi, Amir  RF, Microwave, MM-wave Circuits  

England appointed dean of CECS at UM-Dearborn

Prof. Tony England, ECE faculty member, former astronaut, and most recently Assoc. Dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Engineering, has been named Dean of UM-Dearborn's College of Engineering and Computer Science. He has served as Interim Dean since May 2011. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  England, Anthony W.  

Student Spotlight: Elizabeth Cloos - Ambassador for Optics

Elizabeth Cloos wants to understand how a new interaction between light and matter can generate electricity. But even when she's not in the lab, she finds plenty to keep herself busy, often promoting optics, science, and technology. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  

Paradigm Shifting Research Advances in Sensor Technology

Girish Kulkarni, a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering Program, received a U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support research that has resulted in a new paradigm in sensor technology. His carbon nanoelectronic heterodyne sensor promises both high-speed and highly-sensitive chemical and biological detection. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Graphene  Health  Security (national and personal safety)  Sensors  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Advanced Smart Sensor Networks Open up a Multitude of Applications

A recent article in Electronic Design addresses the synergistic relationship between sensor networks and the Internet of Things, and references some of our extensive contributions in the area (WIMS Center research, Michigan Micro Mote, Infrastructure Monitoring). ECE faculty (and alumni) are still leading the charge in this area, as well as related research in compact radios, neuromorphic computing, energy harvesting, sensor networks, etc. [Full Story]

Night-Vision Contact Lenses that use Infrared Technology

Stained Glass Windows that Double as Solar Panels

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  

Graphene Gives You Infrared Vision in a Contact Lens

Fall 2014: Applied matrix algorithms for signal processing, data analysis and machine learning

Course No.: 453
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor: Raj Nadakuditi
Prerequisites: EECS 301 or MATH 425 or STATS 215 or STATS 412 or STATS 426 or IOE 265 or equivalent

Course Description:
Theory and application of matrix algorithms to signal processing, data analysis and machine learning. Theoretical topics include subspaces, eigenvalue and singular value decomposition, projection theorem, constrained, regularized and unconstrained least squares techniques and iterative algorithms. Applications such as image deblurring, ranking of webpages, image segmentation and compression, social networks, circuit analysis, recommender systems and handwritten digit recognition. Greater emphasis on applications than in EECS 551. [More Info]

Thermal Vision: Graphene light detector first to span infrared spectrum

The first room-temperature light detector that can sense the full infrared (IR) spectrum has the potential to put heat vision technology into a contact lens. IR vision allows us to see in the dark, monitor blood flow, identify chemicals in the environment, and even peer under layers of paint. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graphene  LNF  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Keravnos Energy wants to make fast electric vehicle charging economical

Keravnos Energy, LLC wants to give a jolt to the electric vehicle industry by making quick charging electric vehicle (EV) stations economical. The student founders of this startup company, Rupert Tull de Salis and Dimitris Assanis, got their own charge by winning the Erb Award for Environmental and Social Sustainability at the 2014 Michigan Business Competition. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Electric Vehicles and HEVs  Entrepreneurship  Graduate Students  

Alumni Spotlight-Dawson Yee: Kinect-ing Xbox to the World

Dawson Yee (MSE EE 87) was the Hardware System Engineer and Architect for Xbox 360 Kinect and Xbox One Kinect. Xbox 360 Kinect became the best-selling product in consumer electronics history - selling more than eight million units its first holiday season and extending the capabilities of Xbox well beyond a pure gaming machine. [Full Story]

Muhammad Faisal Wins Business Competition with Technology Critical to the Internet of Things

Muhammad Faisal came to Michigan knowing he wanted to start a company. About to graduate with his PhD in electrical engineering, he has been making some great headway lately by winning the 2014 Michigan Business Challenge. His company is currently called Movellus Circuits, and its product is a patent-pending clock generator technology that is smaller, cheaper and faster than existing solutions. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Technology Transfer  Wentzloff, David  

Transparent color solar cells fuse energy, beauty

Colorful, see-through solar cells could one day be used to make stained-glass windows, decorations and even shades that turn the sun's energy into electricity. The technology is being developed by Prof. Jay Guo's group. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Photon Glue Enables New Quantum State That Could Mean Better Lighting, Solar Cells

Prof. Steve Forrest and colleagues discovered that light can act as a photon glue that binds together the quantum mechanical properties of two vastly different materials used in electronics. The effect could harness the most useful characteristics from each material for hybrid solar cells and high-efficiency lighting, among other applications. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Lighting  Quantum Science and Devices  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Ask Anything: What Happens In Your Computer When You Turn It On?

No, the little mouse inside it does not start scrambling around. Prof. David Blaauw describes the circuit that plays a role in turning on your computer, and then keeps it from getting confused, in a brief article in Popular Science. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  

Taking a step toward a machine that can think

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  

Jamie Phillips Named Arthur F. Thurnau Professor

Professor Jamie Phillips has been named an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, a title granted to tenured faculty whose dedication to undergraduate instruction has demonstrably impacted the intellectual development and lives of their students. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Phillips, Jamie D.  

Now On YouTube: Prof. Ulabys Talk as the 2014 U-M Henry Russel Lecturer

Prof. Fawwaz Ulaby gave the talk Feb. 4 to a crowd of faculty, students, and staff, and was introduced by U-M President Mary Sue Coleman. This lectureship is the highest honor the University bestows on their faculty, and if you listen to the talk, youll understand why he received the honor. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Ulaby, Fawwaz  

Jasprit Singh on Technology and Wellness (video)

Prof. Jasprit Singh, author of 10 textbooks in the area of semiconductors, physics, and related topics, as well as 3 books about culture and yoga, talks about his recent interest in using technology for wellness. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Singh, Jasprit  Technology and Wellness  

What are quantum computers going to do for us?

Prof. Duncan Steel, a leading expert in quantum computer technology, describes how these computers work, and what their implications are for cyber security. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Quantum Computing  Quantum Science and Devices  Security (Computing)  Steel, Duncan  

After two years, bipedal robot takes steps outside

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Asteroid mining could be useful to space travel

Prof. Brian Gilchrist, an expert in space tethering, spoke to The Michigan Daily about asteroid mining. This activity is the focus of the startup company Planetary Resources, where his former student Hannah Goldberg is helping to plan their first space mission. [more about Hannah Goldberg from the lastest issue of EECS News] [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Gilchrist, Brian E.  

Biochips for better cancer therapy

Prof. Yoon's group is working to dramatically accelerate progress in a form of cancer therapy known as photodynamic therapy (PDT), which combines the agents of a photosensitive drug, light, and oxygen to attack cancerous tumors and lesions locally in the targeted region of the body by selective optical illumination. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Health  Medical diagnosis  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Yoon, Euisik  

Jun-Chieh Wang Receives Best Oral Paper Award for Plasma Research

Jerry Wang, a doctoral student in the Electrical Engineering graduate program, received a Best Oral Paper Award at the 8th Asia-Pacific International Symposium on the Basics and Applications of Plasma Technology (APSPT-8) for his research in plasma microdischarges, such as those found in every day laser printers. He is advised by Prof. Mark Kushner. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Kushner, Mark J.  

State Farm Gift Supports Student Projects Lab

State Farm has donated $50,000 to support and enhance the activities of the Student Projects Lab in the Beyster Building, which is home to both the Embedded Systems Hub, a shared resource for the development of projects with embedded systems, and MSuite, the student mobile applications development group. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Brehob, Mark  

Alumni Spotlight: Allan Evans and Avegant: Creating a brilliant multimedia experience from anywhere with Glyph

Dr. Allan Evans (MSE PhD EE 07 10) is on the verge of changing the way we experience media. Allan is CTO and co-founder of Avegant, an Ann Arbor startup in the middle of a successful Kickstarter campaign to fund the next stage of production on their breakout entry into consumer electronics. Glyph is a wearable mobile personal theater with built-in premium audio, and it is the first head-mounted display coming to market that will have a virtual retinal display (VRD). [Full Story]

Alumni Spotlight: Babak Parviz: The Visionary Behind the Glass

Dr. Babak Parviz ((MSE PhD EE 97 01) lives at the intersection of human limitations and technologically augmented human potential. He led development of Google Glass, the wearable computing system that is nearing wide public release, and is now developing potentially life-changing glucose monitoring contact lenses. [Full Story]

Ali Al-Heji Receives Dow Sustainability Fellowship

Ali Al-Heji, graduate student in the Electrical Engineering:Systems program, was named a Dow Sustainability Fellow at Michigan. This interdisciplinary fellowship supports students and scholars who are committed to finding interdisciplinary, actionable, and meaningful sustainability solutions on local-to-global scales. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

2014 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2014 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are Mary Lou Dorf, Clayton Scott, and Herbert Winful. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Scott, Clayton D.  Winful, Herbert  

Fawwaz Ulaby to Deliver Henry Russel Lectureship

Prof. Ulaby mapped the carbon trapped in our nation's forest from space-based radar, and he makes a point to meet with every one of the nearly 200 students in his courses each semester. He will discuss both pillars of his career research and teaching in his upcoming Henry Russel Lecture at 4 p.m. Feb. 4 in the Rackham Amphitheater. This lectureship is one of the universitys highest honors for a senior member of its active faculty. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Ulaby, Fawwaz  

Six ECE Faculty Recognized for Excellence

The College of Engineering recognized David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester for Innovation Excellence, Yogesh Gianchandani for Research Excellence, Stephane Lafortune for Education Excellence, and Anatoly Maksimchuk as Outstanding Research Scientist. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Gianchandani, Yogesh  Lafortune, Stephane  Maksimchuk, Anatoly  Sylvester, Dennis  Winful, Herbert  

Gopal Nataraj Receives ISA Fellowship to Support Research that will Improve MRIs

Gopal Nataraj, a doctoral student in the EE:Systems program, received a fellowship from Innovative Signal Analysis, Inc. to support research that aims to generate higher-quality and faster MRI images than is currently available. The result will be improved diagnostics of neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases, shorter periods of time inside MRI machines by patients, and a reduction in healthcare costs. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Medical Imaging  Medical diagnosis  Signal and Image Processing   

Students rewarded for their circuit designs in EECS 413

The course, Monolithic Amplifier Circuits, has a tradition of offering prizes for the top final projects designed by the students, thanks to the support of industry. This year Tektronix awarded cash prizes to 2 teams for the projects: Adaptive Bandwidth PLL and Inductorless Wideband Balun-LNA. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Zhaoshi Meng Receives Best Paper Award at CAMSAP 2013

Zhaoshi Meng, a doctoral student in the Electrical Engineering:Systems program, received 2nd place in the Student Paper Competition at the 5th IEEE Int. Workshop on Computational Advances in Multi-Sensor Adaptive Processing (CAMSAP 2013). [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  Machine Learning  Networks and Networking  Signal and Image Processing   

Smartphone as mentor: How tech could change behavior

Students at Michigan are developing smartphone apps to enhance mindfulness, attention, and learning, as well as mental and physical health, in Prof. Singh's newly-developed course. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Mobile Computing  Singh, Jasprit