Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE News for 2013

Students See the Music in EE

Agilent featured the course, EECS 314, on their Educator's Corner. The course, designed by Dr. Ganago, teaches EE to non-EECS majors, with a little help from music. [Full Story]

Congratulations 2013 Class of PhDs

After powering through equipment failures, false starts, discovering surprising breakthroughs, writing papers, giving presentations, mentoring students, receiving awards, but most importantly, accomplishing groundbreaking research , these students received their doctoral degrees in 2013. [Full Story]

Al Hero Named 2013 IEEE SPS Technical Achievement Award Winner

Prof. Alfred O. Hero received the 2013 IEEE Signal Processing Society (SPS) Technical Achievement Award, "for information-theoretic advances in statistical signal processing and machine learning." This award honors a person who, over a period of years, has made outstanding technical contributions to theory and/or practice in technical areas within the scope of the SPS. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  

Jason Davis Receives 2013 U-M Distinguished Diversity Leaders Award

Jason Davis, Alumni Relations Coordinator for Electrical and Computer Engineering, is a recipient of the 2013 University of Michigan Distinguished Diversity Leaders Award. This award recognizes individuals and teams that have demonstrated extraordinary commitment and dedication to diversity and inclusion. [Full Story]

Avish Kosari Receives Rackham International Student Fellowship

Avish Kosari, a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering program, received a Rackham International Student Fellowship to continue her studies as a doctoral student in Prof. David Wentzloff's research group. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Pin-Yu Chen Receives Rackham Chia-Lun Lo Fellowship

Pin-Yu Chen, a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering:Systems program, received a Rackham International Student Fellowship to continue his studies in big data. Mr. Chen is a doctoral student in Prof. Al Hero's research group. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Byeongseop Song Receives Rackham International Student Fellowship

Byeongseop Song, a second year master's student in the Electrical Engineering program, received a Rackham International Student Fellowship to continue his studies in the area of optoelectronics. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Mridul Mishra Receives Rackham Non-Traditional Fellowship

Mridul Mishra, a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering:Systems program, received a Rackham Non-Traditional Fellowship to pursue his studies in wireless communications. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Halderman: The Washington Post - News sites could protect your privacy with encryption. Heres why they probably wont.

MABEL the Robot - Video Friday

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Today In Dystopian War Robots That Will Harvest Us For Our Organs

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Anatoly Maksimchuk Elected Fellow of APS

Dr. Anatoly Maksimchuk, ECE Research Scientist and a leader in the High Field Science research group at the Center for Ultrafast Optical Science (CUOS), was elected Fellow of the American Physical Society "for major contributions to the understanding of short pulse high intensity laser-plasma interactions, in particular for innovative experimental work in electron and ion acceleration and radiation generation." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Maksimchuk, Anatoly  

Prof. Mingyan Liu Elected Fellow of the IEEE

Prof. Mingyan Liu has been elected IEEE Fellow, Class of 2014, for contributions to modeling of wireless ad-hoc and sensor networks. Prof. Liu's research interests are in optimal resource allocation, performance modeling and analysis, and energy efficient design of wireless, mobile ad hoc, and sensor networks. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Liu, Mingyan  

No Big Deal, Just a Robot Walking Around Campus

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Two-legged robot walks outside at U-Michigan

With prosthetic feet and hips that can swing sideways for stability, the University of Michigan's newest two-legged robot has taken its first steps outside. The machine named MARLO is the third-generation bipedal robot for Prof. Jessy Grizzle. While its predecessors were connected to lateral support booms and confined to the lab, MARLO can venture out into the sunlight. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Sheila Hemami Named Chair of ECE at Northeastern University

Dr. Sheila Hemami (BSE EE '90) has been named Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Northeastern University in Boston, MA. She received her master's and PhD degrees from Stanford, and most recently was a professor at Cornell University. Her research interests include multimedia signal processing, image & video compression & transmission, and visual psychophysics.
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  

Zachary Lemnios Elected IEEE Fellow

Zacharay Lemnios (BSE EE '76) was named Fellow of IEEE "for leadership in advanced technologies for defense and security systems." Mr. Lemnios is Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering for the US Department of Defense.

Ivan LaHaie elected IEEE Fellow

Ivan LaHaie (MSE PhD EE '77 '81) has been elected Fellow of IEEE, "for contributions to near-to-far field radar signature transformations and radar measurement error mitigation." Dr. LaHaie is principal scientist at Integrity Applications, Inc., at the Ann Arbor office.

Tongue Piercing Controls Wheelchair

Alumnus Maysam Ghovanloo (MSE PhD EE '03 '04), professor at Georgia Tech, was in the news recently for inventing a wheelchair control that uses a headset and a barbell tongue piercing. The work appeared in Science Translational Medicine, and was covered by NBC, BBC, and other news sources. [Full Story]

Khalil Najafi Receives 2013 IEEE Sensors Technical Field Award

Khalil Najafi, Schlumberger Professor of Engineering and Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering, received the 2013 IEEE Sensors Technical Field Award, "For leadership in microsystem technologies and seminal contributions to inertial sensors and hermetic wafer-level packaging." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Najafi, Khalil  

MCubed A Year Later: A Record of Fostering Innovative Research

The first annual MCubed Symposium served as a showcase for the 200+ projects that came into being thanks to the MCubed initiative. In ECE, the program enabled research to progress to the point that our faculty are applying for major grants to continue the work, submitting papers to conferences and journals, and founding new companies. [Full Story]

Winter 2014: EECS 498-003 Multidisciplinary Capstone (MDE) Design Pilot

Course No.: EECS 498-003
Credit Hours: 3-4 credits
Instructor: Brian Gilchrist
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor, senior or grad standing recommended

Course Description:
EECS students, together with ME and MSE students, work on common, interesting, significant major design experience (MDE) projects.

This pilot course is about providing students real-world, multidisciplinary design project opportunities to satisfy their MDE requirement and for EE masters students interested in meaningful project experiences.

For WN14, many of the projects (though not all) will have a biomedical theme that will require EECS students especially with interests in sensors, embedded systems, and wireless.

Please contact Professor Gilchrist with any questions. [More Info]

Students take a Field Trip to a Wind Farm

Students in Prof. Ian Hiskens Electricity Networks and Markets (EECS 598) class and members of his research group recently took a field trip to DTE Energy Companys first company-owned wind farm, called Echo. Students left with a deeper understanding of the reality and challenges of alternative energy. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Alternative Energy  Graduate Students  Wind Technology  

Jeff Fessler Receives 2013 IEEE Edward J. Hoffman Medical Imaging Scientist Award

Prof. Jeff Fessler received the 2013 IEEE Edward J. Hoffman Medical Imaging Scientist Award, For contributions to the theory and application of statistical image reconstruction methods in nuclear medicine, x-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). His group's research has led to improved medical images in hospitals. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  

ECE Research on Display (with event photo gallery)

Research in electrical and computer engineering was on grand display at the 2013 CoE Graduate Symposium. With nearly 100 ECE posters displayed, current and prospective students were able to get a glimpse at the range of research happening in the department, and meet the graduate students making it all happen. [Full Story]

IEEE Recognized as Best Student Branch in SE Michigan

The University of Michigan student chapter of IEEE was named best IEEE student branch in Southeastern Michigan for 2012-2013. Matt Kneiser and Alex Hakkola, the current president and vice president of IEEE at Michigan, accepted the award on behalf of the student chapter at the IEEE Southeast Michigan Section (SEM) Fall Conference, November 6, 2013. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Winter 2014: EECS 598-007 Infrastructure for Vehicle Electrification

Course No.: EECS 598-007
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Ian Hiskens
Prerequisites: EECS 215 or 314

Course Description:
This course covers the fundamentals of the physical and cyber infrastructures that will underpin large-scale integration of plug-in electric vehicles. [More Info]

Steve Mollenkopf: What it takes to lead in technology

Steve Mollenkopf (MSE EE '93), President and COO of Qualcomm, Inc., presented a standing-room only talk to faculty and students when he returned to campus as the 2013 ECE Alumni Merit Award winner. Watch his talk, What it takes to lead in technology, and the brief Q&A session that we recorded. [Full Story]

New algorithms and theory for shining light through non-transparent media

Curtis Jin, a graduate student in electrical engineering, is part of a research team that has developed theory and algorithms that can mitigate or even overcome loss in transmission power due to the multiple scattering of light in non-transparent (ie, scattering) media. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Michielssen, Eric  Nadakuditi, Rajesh Rao  Rand, Stephen  Sensors  Signal and Image Processing   Theory  

Winter 2014: EECS 498-002 Intelligent Interactive Systems

Course No.: EECS 498-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Emily Mower Provost
Prerequisites: EECS 280 or graduate standing

Course Description:
The focus of the course is developing effective speech-based user modeling for interactive systems. We will focus on a series of assistive domains that demonstrate the societal benefit of work in this field, including applications in: depression, autism, and aphasia. Topics will include basic speech modeling, feature handling techniques, data classification, visualization, and interactive system design. [More Info]

Winter 2014: EECS 598-006 Plasmonics

Course No.: EECS 598-006
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Somin Lee
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will review Maxwells equations for the electric and magnetic fields in conductors at low frequencies. Students will be introduced to nanofabrication, including top-down and bottom-up fabrication techniques. Students will also be introduced to characterization techniques of nanoscale objects, including electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and near field microscopy. Finally, optical, electronic, magnetic, thermal and biomedical applications of plasmonics will be discussed. [More Info]

Making the Internet of Things Happen

Prof. David Wentzloff is helping to make a worldwide Internet of Things more than a dream through his research in low-power wireless communication, and more recently, through his new startup company called PsiKick. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Wearable electronics  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

Kyu Hyun Kim Receives Emil Wolf Outstanding Student Paper Award

Kyu Hyun Kim, Ph.D. candidate in electrical engineering, received an Emil Wolf Outstanding Student Paper Competition award at the 2013 OSA Frontiers in Optics conference for his work in microfluidic optomechanics. Potential applications of this research range from ultrasound mapping of a single living cell to fundamental quantum optomechanical experiments with superfluids. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Microfluidics  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  

How a metamaterial might improve a depression treatment

A brain stimulation technique that is used to treat tough cases of depression could be considerably improved with a new headpiece designed by University of Michigan engineers. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Brain  Grbic, Anthony  Health  Metamaterials  Michielssen, Eric  

Winter 2014: EECS 598-005 Statistical Learning Theory

Course No.: EECS 598-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Clayton Scott
Prerequisites: EECS 501 or equivalent

Course Description:
In this course we will prove performance guarantees that quantify the ability of a machine learning algorithm to generalize from training data to unseen test data. Potential topics to be covered include concentration of measure, uniform deviation bounds, empirical and structural risk minimization, Rademacher complexity, Vapnik-Chervonenkis theory, consistency and rates of convergence, margin-based bounds, stability bounds, and application of these theories to learning algorithms such as decision trees, boosting, support vector machines, and kernel density estimators. [More Info]

EECS Students Travel Down Under for the 2013 World Solar Challenge

EECS students helped build, test, and drive Generation, the newest solar car built especially for the 2013 World Solar Challenge. Their roles included Head and Race Strategists for the team, Micro Electrical Engineer, and Power Electrical Engineer. One thing they could not anticipate was the gust of wind that blew the car off the road in the middle of the race. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Student Teams  Undergraduate Students  

New Alumni Startup Promising Better Wearable Display Technology

Allan Evans (MSE PhD EE 07 10), CTO, Ed Tang (BSE EE 11), CEO, and their new company, Avegant, are making headlines with their prototype device that demonstrates a revolutionary display technology called Virtual Retinal Display. It promises an entirely new way to view video that differs from similar-looking devices by projecting light directly into your eye in a way that mimics natural vision. Read more: New York Times, CNET (with video interview), or just google Avegant.

Winter 2014: Random matrix theory, algorithms and signal processing applications

Course No.: 598
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Raj Rao Nadakuditi
Prerequisites: EECS 551 or Linear Algebra equivalent, Basic Probability

Course Description:
This course covers the theory and algorithms emerging from the study of random matrices as it is currently applied in signal processing, machine learning, statistics and science.

Topics include random sample covariance matrices, random graphs, spectral limit theorems such as Wigner's semi-circle and Marcenko-Pastur laws, free probability, randomized numerical linear algebra, matrix statistics, passage to the continuum limit, moment methods, matrix completion and compressed sensing.

There will be a special focus on presenting the theory in a manner that facilitates the development of new applications and allowing students that already have a topic in mind to apply these ideas to their topic.

Emerging applications in signal processing, network analysis, wireless communications and statistical physics will be discussed.

The course requirement will be a term project. Students will form teams of two or work individually. Each team will select a project topic, will study a set of papers related to the topic, will write a critique of the papers, and will give an oral presentation at the end of the semester.

No textbook is required for this course. Throughout the lectures papers will be distributed to the class, and references to the relevant literature will be given.

For more information about this course please contact the instructor. [More Info]

Winter 2014: EECS 498-001 Retrieval and Web Search

Course No.: EECS 498-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Rada Mihalcea
Prerequisites: EECS 216, EECS 401 and EECS 451

Course Description:
This course will cover traditional material, as well as recent advances in Information Retrieval (IR), the study of indexing, processing, querying, and classifying data. Basic retrieval models, algorithms, and IR system implementations will be covered. While the course will primarily focus on IR techniques for textual data, it will also address IR for other media, including images/videos, music/audit files, and geospatial information.

The course will also address topics in Web search, including Web crawling, link analysis, search engine development, social media, and crowd sourcing. Throughout the course, there will be two or three invited lectures from people working at major companies in the field (e.g., Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter). [More Info]

10 Coolest DARPA Projects

Better miniaturized vacuum pumps for electronics and sensors

ECE researchers have built three different types of record-breaking micro scale vacuum pumps that could greatly extend the capabilities of electronics and sensing devices that use these devices, such as gas analyzers for homeland security, healthcare, search and rescue, and other applications. They have also taken an important step towards building an integrated, easily manufactured, micro gas chromatography system that incorporates a vacuum micro pump. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Gianchandani, Yogesh  Health  MEMS and Microsystems  Najafi, Khalil  Security (national and personal safety)  Sensors  

Research that will lead to sharper photos earns best paper award

Research by Dr. Paul Shearer, Prof. Alfred O. Hero, III and Prof. Anna Gilbert, earned Best Paper Award at the 2013 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing. The researchers tackled the problem of "camera shake," which is inevitable in cases where a tripod is either not available or practical for taking pictures. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  Signal and Image Processing   

Forrest: MLive - Michigans $1.33B research enterprise

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  

David Chen Awarded NASA Fellowship to Improve Extreme Weather Prediction

David Chen, graduate student in electrical engineering, received a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship for the 2013-14 academic year to pursue research that will help improve extreme weather prediction. His research will address a potential shortcoming inherent to the L-band remote sensing of ocean surface winds, which is essential for weather forecasting. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Alumni have fun exploring engineering with their kids

Ninety Michigan Engineering alumni brought their children or grandchildren to a day-long summer camp this past August 9, called Xplore Engineering. The event offered a day of experiential learning through a selection of nine different workshops hosted by the different engineering departments. Here in EECS, they were introduced to the world of Nanotechnology and Robotics. [Full Story]

ECE and Automotive Engineering (with video)

Prof. Jim Freudenberg has been named the new director of the U-M master's program in Automotive Engineering. One of his goals is to educate our electrical and engineering students about the ever-expanding opportunities that await them in this field. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Freudenberg, James S.  

Lab Safety - do not let this happen to you!

Have you ever worked in a lab or wanted to work in a lab? Have you ever worked near a lab or wondered what goes on in one? The ECE Safety Committee is committed to keeping students safe in the labs and in their work environments. To emphasize the importance of safety in the lab, ECE created a series of 4 brief videos to emphasize the importance of specific aspects of lab safety. We hope you laugh, learn, and share the message. [Full Story]

Welcome new students

Our staff has been very busy welcoming our new students to ECE. 215 new graduate students are getting to know each other and the program. New undergraduate students will declare next year, but they are part of one of the largest, most diverse, and best prepared classes ever to enter the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

ECE Welcomes Four New Faculty

The ECE Division is delighted to announce the addition of four new faculty: Somin Lee, Johanna Mathieu, Necmiye Ozay, and Becky Peterson. They broaden and deepen ECE's areas of expertise in several areas, including nanophotonic tools for medical applications, environmentally-focused power system design, designing better cyber-physical systems, and micro and nanomanufacturing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lee, Somin E.  Ozay, Necmiye  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  

Ambiq Micro (Blaauw - Sylvester): Market Wired - Ambiq Micro Closes $10M Series B Funding Led by Austin Ventures

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Technology Transfer  

Lu: FOX Detroit - Image processing 1,000 times fast

DARPA Funds Neural Image Processor

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  

Cheng Zhang Awarded SPIE Optics and Photonics Education Scholarship

Cheng Zheng, a Ph.D. candidate in electrical engineering, has been awarded an Optics and Photonics Education Scholarship by the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE) to advance his research in the areas of nanophotonics and nanofabrication. His work could impact next-generation displays as well as biomedical imaging. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Guo, L. Jay  Optics and Photonics  

Image processing 1,000 times faster is goal of new $5M contract

Loosely inspired by a biological brain's approach to making sense of visual information, Prof. Wei Lu is leading a project to build alternative computer hardware that could process images and video 1,000 times faster with 10,000 times less power than today's systems, all without sacrificing accuracy. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Flynn, Michael  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  LNF  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Sensors  Signal and Image Processing   Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Zhang, Zhengya  

Creating the Carl Lewis of robots: Researchers at Penn give latest project legs

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Jae Young Park Receives Best Student Paper Award for Research Impacting Structural Health Monitoring

Jae Young Park, a recent doctoral student in the Electrical Engineering:Systems program, received a Best Student Paper Award at the Signal Processing with Adaptive Sparse Structured Representations (SPARS 2013) conference. The method described in the paper is expected to increase the longevity of battery-based sensor devices that record structural information, increase the accuracy of basic data analysis techniques, and decrease the memory requirements of such tasks. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Sensors  Signal and Image Processing   

Crossbar takes on DRAM and flash storage...

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  

Crossbar Enters Race to Change Memory Chips

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  

ReRAM Startup Bets on Silver

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  

Faster, more powerful mobile devices: U-M startup Crossbar could disrupt the memory market

Crossbar, Inc., co-founded in 2010 by Prof. Wei Lu, announced its emergence from stealth mode after its recent development of a working Crossbar memory array at a commercial fab. With its improvements in speed, power consumption, and endurance combined with half the die size, Crossbar is expected to enable a new wave of electronics innovation for consumer, enterprise, mobile, industrial and connected device applications. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Technology Transfer  

Top Robotic Helicopter Team Sets Sights on Impossible Mission

The Michigan Autonomous Aerial Vehicle student team is headed to the annual International Aerial Robotics Competition on August 7, in which they hope to be the first team to complete all mission objectives for the current challenge. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Student Teams  Undergraduate Students  

Hasso Niemann (1933-2013): From Michigan to Probing Deep Space

Dr. Hasso Niemann (BSE MSE PhD EE '61 '63 '69), a notable NASA scientist "whose instruments probed the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn's largest moon, Titan," passed away at the age of 80. His life and career are fondly remembered by his colleagues. [Full Story]

Tony Fadell: From Apple to Nest Labs, Always a Designer

Anthony Fadell graduated from U-M with a degree in computer engineering, and moved to Silicon Valley to pursue his fortune. He eventually landed at Apple, where he led development of the iPod, and later became strategic advisor to Steve Jobs. After leaving Apple to spend more time with family, he founded Nest Labs and created the self-programming Nest Learning Thermostat. [Full Story]

Chris Berry Receives Paper Award at IEEE Int. Symposium on Antennas and Propagation

Chris Berry received Best Student Paper Award (2nd place) at the IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and USNC-URSI National Radio Science Meeting for his paper Plasmonic Photoconductive Antennas for Significant Terahertz Radiation Enhancement. The paper was co-authored by Mohammed R. Hashemi, Mehmet Unlu, and his advisor, Prof. Mona Jarrahi.
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Kamal Sarabandi Honored with 2013 IEEE GRSS Education Award

Kamal Sarabandi, Rufus S. Teesdale Professor of Engineering, has been selected to receive the 2013 IEEE GRSS Education Award for outstanding contributions to education in the field of Geoscience and Remote Sensing. He received the award during the 2013 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS'2013). [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Eric Michielssen Named Assoc. VP for Advanced Research Computing

Professor Eric Michielssen was recently named Associate Vice President (AVP) for Research, Advanced Research Computing (ARC). As AVP, Prof. Michielssen will work with the campus research community to ensure that U-Ms advanced research computing infrastructure meets the complex and evolving needs of University researchers in a wide range of disciplines. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Michielssen, Eric  

Bharan Giridhar awarded Intel PhD Fellowship

Bharan Giridhar, a Ph.D. candidate in Electrical Engineering, has been selected to receive an Intel Corporation Ph.D. Fellowship to pursue his research in VLSI chip design, with an emphasis on developing circuit techniques for adaptive and reliable, high-performance computing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Graduate Students  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

When GPS fails, this speck of an electronic device could step in

In a pellet of glass the size of an apple seed, Electrical and Computer Engineering researchers have packed seven devices that together could potentially provide navigation in the absence of the satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS.) [Full Story]
Related Topics:  GPS  MEMS and Microsystems  Najafi, Khalil  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  

Research in Production Systems Engineering is Recognized with Best Paper Award

Prof. Semyon Meerkov and postdoctoral researcher Dr. Chao-Bo Yan received a Best Paper Prize for the paper, "Production Lead Time Problem: Formulation and Solution for Bernoulli Serial Lines," presented at the Int. Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC) Conference on Manufacturing Modeling, Management and Control. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Meerkov, Semyon M.  Production Systems Engineering  

Neural Probe Research Recognized with Best Paper Award at 2013 Transducers Conference

Doctoral student Fan Wu received an Outstanding Oral Paper Award at the 17th Int. Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems for the paper, "A Multi-shank Silk-backed Parylene Neural Probe for Reliable Chronic Recording," co-authored by Lee Tien, Fujun Chen, Prof. David Kaplan, Prof. Joshua Berke, and his advisor, Prof. Euisik Yoon. The researchers designed and obtained the first in vivo recording of a biodegradable silk-backed neural probe [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Health  MEMS and Microsystems  Yoon, Euisik  

MEMS Research Recognized with Best Poster Award at 2013 Transducers Conference

Doctoral students Zhengzheng Wu, Vikram Thakar, Adam Peczalski, and their advisor Prof. Mina Rais-Zadeh received a Best Poster Award at the 17th Int. Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems for their paper, "A low phase-noise Pierce oscillator using a piezoelectric-on-silica micromechanical resonator." The paper reports on a high-performance electrical oscillator using a fused silica micro-electromechanical resonator. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  MEMS and Microsystems  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  

Laser can identify substances, could be military tool

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Islam, Mohammed  

from 2 to 2.5 microns at a 25 W output, 50 W coming this year

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Islam, Mohammed  

Diesel Done Right

EE:Systems graduate student Michael Hand (BSE EE 2011) is the recipient of the 2013-14 Bosch Sustainability Fellowship to explore ways to improve diesel efficiency through advanced control and diagnosis strategies. Popular Mechanics is calling 2013 The Year of the Diesel, due to the introduction of several new diesel models by major auto manufacturers. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Zhengya Zhang Receives Intel Early Career Award

Prof. Zhengya Zhang has been selected to receive s a 2013 Intel Early Career Faculty Honor Program award. This award was created to connect Intel with the best and brightest early career faculty members who show great promise as future academic leaders in disruptive computing technologies. Prof. Zhang's research is in the area of low-power and high-performance VLSI circuits and systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Zhang, Zhengya  

New laser shows what substances are made of; could be new eyes for military

A new laser that can show what objects are made of could help military aircraft identify hidden dangers such as weapons arsenals far below. "For the defense and intelligence communities, this could add a new set of eyes," said Prof. Mohammed Islam. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Islam, Mohammed  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Security (national and personal safety)  

Daniel Molzhan will address sustainability challenges as a Dow Fellow

When Daniel Molzahn arrives at Michigan this fall to begin his work as a postdoctoral researcher, he will come as a Dow Sustainability Fellow. His research will be aimed at upgrading the current electric system for the 21st century. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Chris Berry Receives Paper Award at IMS 2013 for Research in Terahertz Technology

Chris Berry, a doctoral student in the Electrical Engineering program, received Best Student Paper Award (3rd place) at the 2013 International Microwave Symposium for his paper Nanoscale Contact Electrodes for Significant Radiation Power Enhancement in Photoconductive Terahertz Emitters. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Terahertz Technology  

Student teams earn prizes for improved image processing techniques in EECS 556

Sponsored and judged by KLA-Tencor, first place went to Gopal Nataraj, Brandon Oselio, and Yash Shah for their technique for speeding up the processing time of MRI scans. Second place went to Taining Liu, Xiaolin Song, and Jinze Yu for using a novel approach to improve weaknesses in the image processing technique known as frame rate up conversion. EECS 556 covers the theory and application of digital image processing, which has applications in biomedical images, time-varying imagery, robotics, and optics. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Sarabandi: Motherboard - This Gun Radar Could Make Concealed Carry Obselete

SHOUT, a censorship-resistant microblogging app for Android

Try out SHOUT and help test this new microblogging app for Android developed by Michigan students. SHOUT provides a way to communicate with others close by - without being dependent on the Internet. The students were advised by Professors Robert Dick, Z. Morley Mao, and Dan Wallach (Rice University). [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Dick, Robert  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  

Prof. Mina Rais-Zadeh Selected to Participate in 2013 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Prof. Rais-Zadeh is one of about 100 outstanding young engineers selected to participate in the 2013 US Frontiers of Engineering Symposium, sponsored by the National Academy of Engineering. The symposium will be held Sept. 19-21 in Delaware, and the main topics are: Designing and Analyzing Societal Networks, Cognitive Manufacturing, Energy, and Flexible Electronics. [NAE press release]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  

Penny-Sized Vacuum System Could Help Detect Chemical Weapons

1,000 times less energy needed for alternative polariton laser

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  

2013 DAC Anniversary Awards

This is the 50th anniversary of the Design Automation Conference, and David Blaauw, Igor Markov, and Dennis Sylvester have been recognized with special awards for their contributions to the conference. Among the awards is the DAC Top 10 Cited Author award, given to David Blaauw, for being a top 10 cited author in the past 50 years. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Markov, Igor  Sylvester, Dennis  

Award-Winning EECS GSIs & IAs Honored

Earlier this month, the Department held its annual Graduate Student Instructor (GSI) / Instructional Aide (IA) Awards Event to honor top student instructors and aides for their remarkable service. Congratulations! [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Workshop to Chart the Future of Nano and Micro Manufacturing

A recent workshop on Nano and Micro Manufacturing brought together more than 140 nano/microscale device and material manufacturers, researchers, and end users of these technologies to discuss how to rapidly and effectively translate university research into practical products. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Gianchandani, Yogesh  LNF  MEMS and Microsystems  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Technology Transfer  WIMS/WIMS2  Wise, Kensall  

Andrew DeOrio and Fawwaz Ulaby Voted HKN Professors of the Year

Based on student input, Dr. Andrew DeOrio and Prof. Fawwaz Ulaby were selected as the 2012-2013 HKN Professors of the Year by U-M Eta Kappa Nu, the local chapter of the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  DeOrio, Andrew  Ulaby, Fawwaz  

2013 Promotions of our Faculty

Congratulations to the following faculty who received promotions this year: Tal Carmon, Jamie Phillips, Silvio Savarese, Thomas Wenisch, and David Wentzloff. Keep up the great work! [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Phillips, Jamie D.  Wenisch, Thomas  Wentzloff, David  

Student teams earn prizes for their ADC circuit designs in EECS 511

Students in the graduate level course, Integrated Analog/Digital Interface Circuits (EECS 511), competed for cash prizes while presenting their final design projects thanks to the support of Analog Devices, Inc. The winning projects were designed for battery-operated mobile applications as well as instrumentation and measurement applications. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Beth Stalnaker Receives 2013 Judith A. Pitney Staff Service Award

Beth Stalnaker, Graduate Program Coordinator for the electrical engineering program, has been selected to receive the 2013 College of Engineering's Judith A. Pitney Staff Service Career Award. This award recognizes the significant contributions of a single CoE staff member with at least 10 years of service. [Full Story]

New cyber-physical systems grants to advance health, energy & transportation

NSF announced two projects to expand the frontiers of cyber-physical systems. Prof. Jessy Grizzle will lead the four-year $4M project called, Correct by Design Control Software Synthesis for Highly Dynamic Systems. Prof. Demos Teneketzis will lead U-Ms effort in the UC-Berkeley based project called, Foundations of Resilient Cyber-Physical Systems (FORCES). [NSF press release] [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Communications  Control Systems  Cyber-physical systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Hiskens, Ian  Teneketzis, Demosthenis  Theory  

Prof. Fawwaz Ulaby Named the U-M Henry Russel Lecturer for 2014

The Henry Russel Lectureship is considered the University's highest honor for a senior faculty member, and recognizes exceptional achievements in research, scholarship or creative endeavors, and an outstanding record of teaching, mentoring and service. Prof. Ulaby will deliver the lecture in 2014. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Ulaby, Fawwaz  

Polariton Lasers Light Up at Low Power

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  

A new laser paradigm: An electrically injected polariton laser

Prof. Pallab Bhattacharya and his group have demonstrated a paradigm-shifting polariton laser that's fueled not by light, but by electricity. Prof. Bhattacharya calls the device, which was first suggested in 1996, truly transformative. The device requires at least 1,000 times less energy to operate than a conventional laser. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  CPHOM  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Spark Races in 2013 Formula Hybrid Racing Competition

In their second year of competition, the Michigan Hybrid Racing team and their car, Spark, overcame several obstacles on their way to a 4th place finish in the 2013 Formula Hybrid Racing Competition, held at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway April 29-May 1. They also took 2nd place in the Chrysler Innovation Award. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Electric Vehicles and HEVs  Student Teams  Undergraduate Students  

Sarabandi: Michigan Public Radio Podcast: Building Better Security Screening Systems

Carmon: Nature Photonics - View from... 2013 Photonics West: Solid Cooling

Prof. Silvio Savarese Awarded J. James R. Croes Medal

Computer vision professor Silvio Savarese and colleagues have been awarded the 2013 J. James R. Croes Medal from the American Society of Civil Engineers for developing a method to automatically track structural changes happening in construction sites, while enabling data to be collected simply and inexpensively. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Robotics and Computer Vision  Savarese, Silvio  

Research in distributed networks earns Notable Paper Award at AISTATS

The research by Prof. Al Hero, ECE graduate student Zhaoshi Meng, and Dr. Dennis Wei provides a way to efficiently reveal relationships between even distant entities in a network, whether it be a social network or a network of sensors. The group will present their research at the 16th Int. Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  Machine Learning  Networks and Networking  Signal and Image Processing   

Leo Kempel Named Acting Engineering Dean at Michigan State

Leo Kempel, associate dean for research and professor in the College of Engineering at Michigan State University, was named acting dean of the College of Engineering. Dr. Kempel received his master's and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan. [Full Story]

ECE Alum Kevin Xu Wins Social Computing Challenge Competition

Dr. Kevin Xu (MS PhD EE:Systems '09 '12) took first prize at the Challenge Problem competition sponsored by the 2013 Int. Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling, and Prediction Conference. The challenge problem required the participants to discover ways to interpret given data sets in a way that could be used to predict future social behavior. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Najafi, Peterson: Kurzweil - Low-cost precise navigation without GPS

Nick Clift is crowned Mr. Michigan for 2013

Congratulations Nick Clift for being crowned Mr. Michigan for 2013. The U-M Mr. Michigan pageant raises money for worthwhile causes, and raises awareness of the participating students' chosen team or group. Nick is a board member of The Detroit Partnership, a student-run non-profit that strives to connect the Detroit and U-M communities. [Full Story]

Tech Transfer, Accuri Cytometers, Arborlight: CBS News - UM Startups Amaze As Tech Tour Continues

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Technology Transfer  

Sarabandi: Slate - How New Military Technologies Can Help Prevent the Next Boston or Newtown

Najafi, Peterson: Wired - Darpas New Navigation Tool Is Smaller Than a Penny

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  GPS  Najafi, Khalil  

Najafi, Peterson: DARPA - Extreme Miniaturization

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  GPS  Najafi, Khalil  

Ethan Stark Awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Ethan Stark has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to continue his studies at the University of Michigan. Ethan will receive his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering this term, and begin his first semester as an EE graduate student in the fall. He is currently investigating visible light emitters using GaN microstructures for quantum dot and nanowire-based LEDs and lasers. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Jarrahi: PhysOrg - Better than X-rays: A more powerful terahertz imaging system

Jarrahi: National Science Foundation - Better Than X-rays

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

A better single-photon emitter for quantum cryptography

A silicon-based single-photon emitter developed by Prof. Pallab Bhattacharya and his group is simpler and more efficient than those currently available, and can be made using traditional semiconductor processing techniques. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  LNF  Optics and Photonics  Quantum Science and Devices  Security (Computing)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Fall 2013: EECS 598-005 Hybrid Systems Control

Course No.: EECS 598-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Necmiye Ozay
Prerequisites: EECS 562 or EECS 560 and instructor permission

Course Description:
Hybrid systems, dynamical systems where continuous dynamics and discrete events interact, are ubiquitous and can be found in many different contexts. Examples are as diverse as manufacturing processes, biological systems, energy systems, medical devices, robotics systems, automobiles and aircrafts. Advances in computing and communications technologies have enabled engineering such systems with a high degree of complexity. Most of these systems are safety-critical, hence their correctness must be verified before they can be deployed. This course will provide a working knowledge of several analysis and design techniques to guarantee safety, reliability and performance of such systems. [More Info]

Better than X-rays: A more powerful terahertz imaging system

Prof. Mona Jarrahi and her group developed a laser-powered terahertz source that will allow for deeper imaging of tissue, and the sensing of smaller quantities of drugs and explosives from farther distances than is currently possible. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Health  Jarrahi, Mona  Medical Imaging  Sensors  Terahertz Technology  

Sarabandi: gizmag - Radar used to detect concealed weapons in public spaces

Sarabandi: Fox News - Could a military radar prevent further Newtown style tragedies?

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Michigan @ ISSCC 2013 - Alumni and Friends Mixer

The 5th Annual University of Michigan Alumni and Friends Mixer at ISSCC (International Solid-State Circuits Conference) was a great success as old and new friends gathered to discuss the day, catch up with friends, and simply relax together. Alumni in the area are always invited, and several came to reconnect with their Maize and Blue colleagues. [Full Story]

7th Annual AMD/Michigan Student Design Contest

Thanks to the sponsorship of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., students in the Fall 2012 EECS 427 (VLSI Design I) class competed against their classmates for cash prizes in the 7th Annual AMD/Michigan Student Design Contest. This year, more than 60 students took this team project-oriented, major design experience course. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Researchers Funded to Develop a Leap Forward in Processor Architectures

A team of researchers led by Trevor Mudge, Bredt Family Professor of Engineering and Director of the ARM Research Center at Michigan, has been funded for research and development of hardware and software techniques that directly support and make practical a new generation of energy efficient, high performance multi-layer processor systems for use in embedded computing systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Embedded Computing and Systems  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Mahlke, Scott  Mudge, Trevor  Near-threshold computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Zhang, Zhengya  

Fall 2013: ENGR 390/599 Imagine Innovate Act

Course No.: ENGR 390
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Jasprit Singh
Prerequisites:

Course Description:
This course is open to students interested in technology and/or culture and/or wellness. To learn more about the course, contact Prof. Jasprit Singh (singh@umich.edu) or Dr. John Hinckley (ncko@umich.edu). Flyer attached! [More Info]

IEEE Spectrum: Better Eyes for Flying Robots

The Noisy Wolverines earn the right to compete for gold

The team called "Noisy Wolverines" made it through the first round of competition to be among the top 15 teams in the nation to compete in the DARPA Spectrum Challenge competition. They hope to take home the prize for best communication system design. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Student Teams  

NAE Awards Mona Jarrahi a Grainger Foundation Frontiers of Engineering Grant

Prof. Mona Jarrahi, together with Prof. Jordan Green, an assistant professor of Biomedical Engineering at The Whitaker Institute at Johns Hopkins, have received a Grainger Foundation Frontiers of Engineering Grant by the National Academy of Engineering to explore genetic therapy methods to treat diseases. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Genetics  Health  Jarrahi, Mona  Terahertz Technology  

Sarabandi: Popular Science - Researcher Says Radar Tech Could Detect Guns at School

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

After Newtown: A new use for a weapons-detecting radar?

In the aftermath of the Newtown school shooting, Prof. Kamal Sarabandi envisions a new use for a weapons-detecting radar system he's been developing for the past few years. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  Security (national and personal safety)  Weapons detection  

Prof. Dennis Sylvester Receives U-M Faculty Recognition Award

Prof. Dennis Sylvester was selected to receive a U-M Faculty Recognition Award. This award recognizes "mid-career faculty who have demonstrated remarkable contributions to the University through outstanding achievements in scholarly research and/or creative endeavors; excellence as a teacher, advisor and mentor; and distinguished participation in the service activities of the university and elsewhere." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

U-M partners with Israeli university on renewable energy

The University of Michigan and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel will forge a research partnership to collaborate on developing renewable technologies. The partnership grew out of U-M's VP for Research Stephen Forrest's visits to Israel over the past five years, and will focus on the areas of advanced vehicle fuels, solar energy, and thermoelectric materials, which convert heat to electricity. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Alternative Energy  Energy  Forrest, Stephen  International Partnerships  

Graduate Students Recognized with Towner Prize

Each year the College of Engineering awards the Towner Prize for Distinguished Academic Achievement to outstanding graduate students (Master's or Ph.D.). This year, EECS students Mads Almassalkhi, Andrew Hollowell, and Mehrzad Samadi claimed the prize. [Full Story]

Graduate Student Instructors Recognized with Towner Prize

Each year the College of Engineering awards the Towner Prize for Outstanding GSIs to the top graduate student instructors throughout the College. This year, three of the four awards granted went to EECS students Apoorva Bansal, Jay Patel, and Holly Tederington. [Full Story]

Fall 2013: EECS 598 Ultra-Low-Power CMOS Circuit Design

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: Up to 4 credits
Instructor: Pinaki Mazumder
Prerequisites: EECS 312 or EECS 427 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
Following the trajectory of the Moores Law, the integration density of VLSI chips has grown exponentially from two thousand transistors per chip in the early Seventies (i4004) to over one billion transistors (Itanium) in 2009. During this time, CMOS VLSI design has witnessed multiple generations of evolution as the CMOS circuit design focus gradually shifted from Silicon real estate (in the late 70s) to timing closure (in the late 80s), to power aware (in the late 90s), and then to process variations(reliability) at sub-100 nm transistor dimensions. This course envisages studying energy-aware CMOS circuit design techniques that are currently being used in building low-power (at nominal supply voltage) and ultra-low-power (in subthreshold region) VLSI systems. Students interested in taking this course must have basic background in CMOS design (equivalent to EECS 312) and are expected to know circuitequations for minimization of power consumption as well as energy-delay optimization. The course will mainly focus on various aspects of sub-threshold CMOS circuit design as outlined below. [More Info]

Fall 2013: EECS 598 VLSI Digital Signal Processing Systems

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Zhengya Zhang
Prerequisites: EECS 427 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
Digital signal processing (DSP) systems have been enabled by the advances in very-large scale-integrated (VLSI) technologies. New DSP applications constantly impose new challenges on VLSI implementations. These implementations must satisfy real-time constraints imposed by the applications and must fit increasingly stringent area and power envelope. This course will survey methodologies needed to design efficient and high-performance custom or semi-custom VLSI systems for DSP applications. The primary focus of the course is on design of architectures, algorithms, and circuits, which can be operated with small area and low power consumption to deliver a high speed and functional performance. [More Info]

Fall 2013: EECS 598 Electricity Networks and Markets

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Ian Hiskens
Prerequisites: EECS 463 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course covers the principles and practices that underpin reliable and economical operation of power systems. Power system networks and modeling will be discussed, and an overview of closed-loop controls and basic stability concepts will be provided. System control centres will be considered, primarily in terms of supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) and energy management system (EMS) requirements. Power system state estimation will be presented, along with techniques for on-line evaluation of system reliability. The course will investigate optimal generation scheduling and dispatch, including unit commitment, economic dispatch, optimal power flow, and automatic generation control (AGC). Electricity market structures and mechanisms will be presented, with consideration given to the roles of day-ahead and real-time markets, energy and capacity markets, bilateral trading, and markets for ancillary services. The issues that arise from trading over transmission networks will be considered. A comparison of various markets, including MISO, PJM, AEMO, and the failed Californian market will be undertaken. Issues arising from the variability and uncontrollability of renewable generation will be explored. [More Info]

Students Form SkySpecs LLC, Win Clean Energy Challenge

A team of four U-M students, including Sam DeBruin (BSE CE '12 and current CSE graduate student) and Ryan Moore (BSE CE '11), has formed a venture that aims to produce autonomous flying robots for infrastructure inspection. [Full Story]

Bharan Giridhar awarded Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for research in circuit techniques for adaptive, reliable, high-performance computing

Bharan Giridhar, a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering program, received a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his research while he completes his dissertation entitled, Circuit Techniques for Adaptive and Reliable, High-Performance Computing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Gyouho Kim awarded Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for research in ultra-low power optical interfaces for mm-scale wireless sensor nodes

Gyouho Kim, a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering program, received a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his research while he completes his dissertation entitled, Ultra-Low Power Optical Interfaces for Nearly Invisible Cubic-Millimeter Wireless Sensor Nodes. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Revzen: Discovery - Cockroaches teach robots to balance

Revzen: Popular Science - Watch: How Cockroaches Are Helping Scientists Design Better Robots

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  

Scientific Milestone: A room temperature Bose-Einstein condensate

Prof. Pallab Bhattacharya and a team of researchers have created and directly observed what they believe to be a near-equilibrium room temperature Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). A BEC is an unusual state of matter in which a group of boson particles can exist in a single quantum state, giving scientists the rare opportunity to directly observe novel quantum phenomena. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  CPHOM  LNF  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Wind-energy programs yield engineering jobs

This article talks about what is involved in a wind-energy academic program, which is a specialty of Prof. Ian Hiskens. "Electrical engineers work with and design power systems, power electronics and control systems and analyze delivery and flow into the grid." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Forrest: U-M research funding up, but sequestration threatens budget

Cockroaches and robots: Reverse engineering the balance systems of animals

Running cockroaches start to recover from being shoved sideways before their dawdling nervous system kicks in to tell their legs what to do. This new insight by Prof. Shai Revzen and colleagues into how biological systems stabilize could one day help engineers design steadier robots and improve doctors understanding of human gait abnormalities. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Biomimicry  Health  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Computer Vision  Security (national and personal safety)  

Bhattacharya: Ars Technica - Bose-Einstein condensate created at room temperature

Forrest: Science Magazine - Space Solar Cells With A Down-to-Earth Cost

David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester Named Top Authors by ISSCC

Prof. David Blaauw and Prof. Dennis Sylvester have been named two of the top 16 contributing authors in the last 60 years to the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC), which is the flagship conference of the Solid-State Circuits Society. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Guo: Optics and Photonics - Subwavelength Grooves Reflect Consistent Colors

Guo: EE Times - Reflective display funnels light

Translating animal movement into better robotic design

Prof. Shai Revzen pioneered a method, called Data Driven Floquet Analysis (DDFA), which he is currently using to test scientific theories of neuromechanical control in animals and humans, and extract principles that may guide future robotic design. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Biomimicry  Health  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Next-gen e-readers: Improved peacock technology could lock in color for high-res displays

Prof. Jay Guo and his group have found a way to lock in so-called structural color, which is made with texture rather than chemicals. This could lead to advanced color e-books and electronic paper, as well as other color reflective screens that don't need their own light to be readable. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Biomimicry  Displays  Electronic devices  Guo, L. Jay  LNF  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Mighty Mobile: A Supercomputer in Your Pocket

The College of Engineering has highlighted work in the department on technologies under development at Michigan that will continue to enable the mobile computing revolution. See their digital multimedia experience here. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Lu, Wei  Mobile Computing  Mudge, Trevor  Papaefthymiou, Marios  Sylvester, Dennis  Wenisch, Thomas  

Computers that mimic the brain thanks to memristors (video)

Prof. Wei Lu and graduate student Patrick Sheridan talk about their research developing a new type of electronic switch that mimics the behavior of a biological neuron in the human brain. Resulting computers can learn without being programmed. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Brain  Electronic devices  LNF  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Predicting your risk of illness

Imagine a future when you could predict whether or not you are at risk of becoming sick. Prof. Al Hero is working to make that a reality with his research into the human genome's response to viral illnesses. Watch the video to learn more. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Genetics  Health  Hero, Alfred  Signal and Image Processing   

Lowering CT Radiation for Improved Health

Jeff Fessler is working with U-M radiologists to create high-quality CT scans with lower radiation in a much faster time frame than currently possible. Technology developed by Prof. Fessler and his research group is in use at U-M hospital. Watch the video to see his algorithms in action. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Health  Medical Imaging  Signal and Image Processing   

A new laser to ID distant materials night and day

Can large-output lasers be used to identify materials at long distances? Prof. Mohammed Islam is working to create lasers that can identify items that are more than a kilometer away. Watch the video to learn more. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Islam, Mohammed  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Security (national and personal safety)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Power Electronics at Michigan - Some research, teaching, and student teams

Engineering TV visited Michigan recently to talk with Prof. Heath Hofmann and hear what was going on in the area of power electronics. In three separate videos, Prof. Hofmann talks about his research, about power electronics at Michigan, and about the student team Michigan Hybrid Racing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Power and Energy Curriculum: Engineering TV - video with Heath Hofmann

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Hofmann: Engineering TV - Automotive Power Electronics

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Solid-State Circuits Magazine Publishes Special Issue with Lynn Conway Memoir of the VLSI Revolution

Professor Emerita Lynn Conway, who revolutionized Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) design, has been featured in a special edition of IEEE Solid-State Circuits Magazine. The issue includes her 24-page memoir and related articles by colleagues who offer their perspectives on the VLSI revolution. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Conway, Lynn  

David Wentzloff Receives CAREER Award for Research in Energy-Autonomous Systems

Prof. David Wentzloff, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was recently awarded an NSF CAREER award for his research project, "Ultra-Low Power Radios for Energy-Autonomous Systems." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

Zhaohui Zhong Receives CAREER Award for Research in Graphene-based Optoelectronics

Prof. Zhaohui Zhong, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was recently awarded an NSF CAREER award for his research project, "Graphene Heterostructures Based Hot Carrier Optoelectronics." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graphene  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Special Recognition Award to Dr. Kurt Metzger

Dr. Kurt Metzger, Associate Research Scientist Emeritus, was recognized with a special award by the department in recognition of his outstanding contributions to student understanding and appreciation of applied signal processing, and in particular, of extraordinary contributions to the major design course EECS 452: Digital Signal Processing Laboratory. [Full Story]

2013 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2013 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are David Blaauw, Wei Lu, and Z. Morley Mao. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Lu, Wei  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  

Mark Kushner Appointed to Advisory Board for DoE National Lab

Mark Kushner, George I. Haddad Professor of EECS, has been appointed to the advisory board for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for a four-year term. PPPL is a major U.S. Department of Energy funded research center established for collaborative work in fusion energy research. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  

MCubing by ECE Faculty to find answers - fast

Ten different ECE faculty are teaming up with colleagues across the University - from Epidemiology to Political Science, Ophthalmology to Psychiatry, Neurosurgergy to Astronomy - to pursue new initiatives deemed to have major societal impact in the U-M MCubed program. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Big Data  Brain  Energy  Flynn, Michael  Gianchandani, Yogesh  Graphene  Grbic, Anthony  Guo, L. Jay  Health  Hero, Alfred  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  LEDs  Medical diagnosis  Microscopy  Plasma Science and Engineering   Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Space technology  

EECS faculty are MCubing to find answers - fast

Thanks to the University of Michigan MCubed program, EECS faculty are teaming up with colleagues across the University - from Epidemiology to Political Science, Ophthalmology to Psychiatry, Neurosurgergy to Astronomy - to pursue new initiatives deemed to have major societal impact. Take a look at the 15 projects successfully cubed. [Full Story]

Students in EECS 413 awarded prizes for their circuit designs

Students in the course Monolithic Amplifier Circuits earned cash prizes for their final projects, all implemented in a commercial 0.13m CMOS process. The winning projects were "A Rail to Rail Class AB Amplifier" and "Ultra Low Power Crystal Oscillator." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Using HERCULES to probe the interior of dense plasmas

For the first time, researchers probed the interior of highly dense plasmas using the world's most intense tabletop laser called HERCULES, located in the Center for Ultrafast Optical Science (CUOS). Scientists are now able to study very dense plasmas, which has important implications for nuclear fusion energy and astrophysical research. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Center for Ultrafast Optical Science (CUOS)  HERCULES  Lasers  Plasma Science and Engineering   

Three EECS Faculty Recognized with College of Engineering Awards

Three EECS faculty have received awards from the College of Engineering: Peter Chen (Undergraduate Teaching Award), Jeffrey Fessler (Research Excellence Award), and Andrew Yagle (Service Excellence Award). Congratulations! [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Chen, Peter  Fessler, Jeffrey  Yagle, Andrew E.  

Arbor Photonics acquired by nLIGHT

Arbor Photonics, co-founded in 2007 by Prof. Almantas Galvanauskas, was recently acquired by nLIGHT, a semiconductor laser maker. Prof. Galvanauskas, who will be on their technical board, "pioneered the development of a proprietary technology it calls Chirally-Coupled Core (3C)." The technology "is said to enable state-of-the-art high-power fiber lasers with peak powers of up to 100 kW." [Optics.org article] [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

Guo-Yoon: Popular Science - A Nanotube Lens Focuses Sound Waves Into and Invisible Sonic Scalpel

Guo-Yoon: IEEE Spectrum - Nanoparticle Coated Lens Converts Light into Sound for Precise Non-invasive Surgery

Guo-Yoon: Discover News - Lens Converts Light Into Sound