Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE News for 2011

Najafi: Australian Broadcasting Corp (Radio interview RE cyborg bugs)

Najafi-Aktakka: NTVMSNBC (Turkey) - Bcekler depremzedeleri kurtaracak

Najafi: Korean News Service (Daum) - (RE the Cyborg bugs)

Guo: EngineerLive - Coloured solar cells could make display screens more efficient

Prof. Grizzle Receives 2012 Bode Lecture Prize from IEEE Control Systems Society

Jessy Grizzle, Jerry W. and Carol L. Levin Professor of Engineering, received the 2012 Hendrik W. Bode Lecture Prize for his distinguished contributions to control systems science and engineering. Jessy's work in nonlinear system theory has been applied to automotive applications and more recently bipedal robots, and has had a fundamental impact on the field. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Chunyang Zhai Awarded Rackham International Student Fellowship

Chunyang Zhai, a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering program, is designing a magnetic field sensor to detect bridge cracks and other signs of weakness. Her general area of study is analog and mixed-signal circuits. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

David D. Chen Awarded NSERC Fellowship for Earth Remote Sensing

David Chen's research involves analyzing and tuning the performance of the radio frequency interference (RFI) algorithm of the Aquarius radiometers, which were launched in June of this year. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Srinath Sridhar Awarded Rackham International Student Fellowship

Srinath Sridhar, a second year master's student in the Electrical Engineering:Systems program, was awarded a Rackham International Student Fellowship for 2011-12. He is currently a research intern at the Honda Research Institute USA, Inc. working on a computer vision based AR system for intelligent cars. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Student Spotlight - Aminur Rahman: From EE student to entrepreneur

Aminur Rahman is about to graduate with his UG degree in electrical engineering. In 2010, his decision to stand in line at an MPowered Career Fair led to his current activity as senior engineer and president of Invisi-Tag, a company he started with the support of Sargon Partners, a venture capital company. [Full Story]

Wireless sensor network research makes hot tech list

EE Times featured Michigan Engineering wireless sensor network technology on its list of 20 hot technologies to watch in 2012. The magazine listed wireless sensor networks at No. 2 and highlighted work by David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Jihyun Cho Awarded Rackham International Student Fellowship

Jihyun Cho is a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering program, working with Prof. Euisik Yoon. His is currently working on a 3D image sensor, and has plans to work on a high-density low-cost fluorescence / luminescence detection platform for biological / chemical sensors. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Blaauw-Sylvester: EE Times 20 hot technologies for 2012

Guo: Popular Science - Carbon Nanotube Stealth Paint Could Make Any Object Ultra-Black

Jinyoung Hwang Receives Best Poster Award for Research Leading to Improved Solar Cells

Jinyoung Hwang, doctoral student in the electrical engineering program, received the award at the 2011 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting. Collaborators on the poster were her advisor, Prof. Jamie Phillips, and researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Andrew Martin and Prof. Joanna Millunchick. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Phillips, Jamie D.  

Sid Bao earns Best Student Paper Award for Computer Vision Research

Sid Ying-Ze Bao, an electrical engineering:systems PhD student, received the award at the 1st IEEE Workshop on Challenges and Opportunities in Robot Perception. The paper was co-authored by EE:Systems master's student Mohit Bagra and Bao's advisor, Prof. Silvio Savarese. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Guo: Technology Review - Nano Paint Could Make Airplanes Invisible to Radar

Jarrahi-Carmon: Laser Focus World - Whispering-gallery resonator generates CW fourth-harmonic UV light

Jarrahi-Carmon: Futurity - Ultraviolet lasers get smarter

Najafi-Aktakka: CNET - Could cyborg insects act as first responders?

Najafi-Aktakka: Futurity - Cyborg bugs as first responders

Najafi-Aktakka: Popular Science - Cyborg Insects Could Be First Responders in Rescue Situations

Guo: Innovation News Daily - New Material Makes Objects Appear Invisible

New coating makes objects invisible

Prof. Jay Guo and his research group developed a carbon nanotube coating that acts as a "magic black cloth." It conceals an object's three-dimensional geometry and makes it look like a flat black sheet. The coating could inspire a new type of camouflaging paint for stealth aircraft, and suggests interesting interpretations of deep space. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Security (national and personal safety)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Dr. Dennis Grimard Receives Work/Life Champion Award for Supervisors

Dr. Dennis Grimard was honored recently at a public ceremony for receiving one of the inaugural U-M Work/Life Champion Awards for Supervisors. As Managing Director of the Lurie Nanofabrication Facility (LNF), Dr. Grimard oversees the work of approx. 25 highly trained technical staff. The award recognizes U-M faculty and staff supervisors who promote work/life balance through consistent recognition of and responsiveness to their employees' professional and personal lives. [Full Story]

A smarter way to make ultraviolet light beams

ECE faculty Mona Jarrahi and Tal Carmon, and graduate students Jeremy Moore and Matthew Tomes have found a better way to build a compact ultraviolet light source with low power consumption that could improve information storage, microscopy and chemical analysis. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Electronic devices  Health  Information Technology  Jarrahi, Mona  Lasers  Terahertz Technology  

Michigan Hybrid Racing

For the first time, University of Michigan students will enter the Formula SAE Hybrid competition, held May 2012, with their team, Michigan Hybrid Racing. The team is advised by Prof. Heath Hofmann. Watch a video of the new team. [Full Story]

EECS Alumnus Anna Stefanopoulou on 55 MPG

Prof. Anna Stefanopoulou (MSE EE '94 and PhD EE:Systems '96) spoke to NPR about getting cars to 55 MPG, and the work that goes on in the U-M Automotive Research Center. [Full Story]

Guo: Science - ScienceShot: How to Make a Tank Disappear

Guo: BBC News - Carbon nanotube space camouflage coating invented

Celebrating the Birth of a New Science

On October 26, 2011, close to 500 participants packed the Michigan League Ballroom for a symposium celebrating the 50th anniversary of the birth of Nonlinear Optics. Applications of nonlinear optics range from fiber-optic communications to biological imaging and homeland security. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Winful, Herbert  

Insect cyborgs to search and monitor hazardous environs

Research conducted by Prof. Khalil Najafi and Erkan Aktakka may lead to the use of insects to monitor hazardous situations before sending in humans. Najafi and Aktakka are finding ways to harvest energy from insects, and take the utility of the miniature cyborgs to the next level. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Energy Scavenging  LNF  MEMS and Microsystems  Najafi, Khalil  Security (national and personal safety)  Sensors  

Prof. David Blaauw Elected Fellow of the IEEE

Prof. David Blaauw has been named an IEEE Fellow, Class of 2012, for contributions to adaptive and low power circuit design. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  

ECE Startup ePack, Inc. Wins Masco Next Gen Manufacturing Award at Innovation Competition

ePack, Inc. received the award and $25K at the second annual Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition, held Nov. 15-17, 2011. The company specializes in advanced packaging solutions for MEMS devices, especially electronic sensors. MEMStim earned an honorable mention in the student category. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  MEMS and Microsystems  Najafi, Khalil  Technology Transfer  

Professor Emeritus Ted Birdsall Receives Silver Medal in Signal Processing in Acoustics

Professor Emeritus Theodore G. Birdsall was recently honored with the Silver Medal in Signal Processing in Acoustics by the Acoustical Society of America, "for contributions to signal detection theory and development of coded sequences in underwater acoustics." He is only the second recipient of this award. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

2011 ECE Poster Display at the Engineering Graduate Symposium

Research ranging from electric vehicles, to a fast and smooth walking robot, cancer detection, miniaturized antennas, and circuits was presented in more than 90 research posters by ECE graduate students at the 2011 CoE Graduate Symposium. Congratulations to the student winners: Vikrant Gokhale, Vasudev Lal, Mads Almassalkhi, Young Jun Song, Matt Prelee, Anne Itsuno, and Yang Liu! [Full Story]

Winter 2012: Ubiquitous Parallelism

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Satish Narayanasamy
Prerequisites: EECS 470 or 482 or grad standing

Course Description:
Processors with over hundred cores have already become a reality. However, technologies that can allow mainstream programmers to take advantage of this massive parallelism remains to be a grand challenge in computer science. This course will cover recent advances that seek to address this challenge. We will discuss holistic solutions that cut across the computing stack from languages to processor design. Specific topics include high-productivity languages, transactional memory, deterministic parallel computing, GPGPU, MapReduce, multi-core OS, active testing, speculative parallelism, etc.

The course includes a term project. We may be able to get you access to latest parallel programming tools and systems for your project such as compute resources in a cloud, many-core systems, Thread checker, record-n-replay tool, debugging tools such as CHESS, etc. [More Info]

Winter 2012: Autonomous Robotics Laboratory

Course No.: EECS 498
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor: Ed Olson
Prerequisites: EECS 281 or instructor permission

Course Description:
This course will provide students with essential theoreticalbackground and hands-on experience in central topics inrobotics. These include: kinematics, inverse kinematics,sensors and sensor processing, and motion planning. Teamsof students will explore these subjects through a series ofchallenge-themed laboratory exercises. Successful studentswill develop a pragmatic understanding of both theoreticalprinciples and real-world issues, enabling them to designand program robotic systems incorporating sensing,planning, and acting.

We explore these topics from a computer scienceperspective, but we will also cover critical robotics topicsthat are often omitted from computer science curricula.These may include, for example, electrical circuits, controlsystems, Kalman filters, mechanics, and dynamics.Specialized computer science topics such as embeddedsystems programming, real time operating systems, artificialintelligence, etc., may also make appearances. Nobackground is assumed in these areas.

The course is intended for upper-level computer scienceundergraduates, though any one with the appropriatebackground is welcome. [More Info]

Ian Hiskens Presented with an IEEE Power & Energy Society Prize Paper Award for Best Paper of the Past 5 Years

Prof. Hiskens received the award at the 2011 Power & Energy Society General Meeting, held in Detroit, MI. The paper, "Sensitivity, Approximation, and Uncertainty in Power System Dynamic Simulation," co-authored by Jassim Alseddiqui, was written in 2006. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Hiskens, Ian  Power & Energy  

New Method for Building a Low-cost, High-Performance Electric Machine and Drive Could Result in Huge Energy Savings

Prof. Heath Hofmann will be expanding his impact on the field of electric machines and drives in a newly funded project supported by the Bosch Energy Research Network. The research could potentially result in huge energy savings due to the widespread use of these machines and the applicability of Hofmann's research project to these devices. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Electric machines  Hofmann, Heath  Power & Energy  

Winter 2012: Advanced Signal Processing & Applications

Course No.: 498
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Raj Rao Nadakuditi
Prerequisites: EECS 451, EECS 401 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This is an course on advanced topics in signal processing designed to follow up on principles learned in EECS 451 and EECS 401. The central theme of the course is the application of tools from linear algebra to signal processing. Theoretical topics include solving least-squares problems, eigenvalues and eigenvalues, the singular value decomposition, Markov chains, power method. Synergistic applications covered include image compression, handwriting recognition, Googles PageRank algorithm, eigen-faces, community detection in networks, and deconvolution. Students are expected to be familiar with material covered in EECS 451 and EECS 401 and should have basic MATLAB programming skills (such as writing loops, plotting functions, etc.) [More Info]

Winter 2012: EECS 598 Machine Learning Applications in Human-Centered Computing in

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Emily Mower
Prerequisites: Students should have familiarity with probability theory and machine learning tools

Course Description:
Human-centered computing (HCC) is the science of decoding human behavior. HCC seeks to provide a computational account of aspects of human behavior ranging from interaction patterns to individual emotion expression using techniques drawn from both signal processing and machine learning. However, the complexity of this new domain necessitates alterations to the techniques common within the machine learning field and a fundamental understanding of the domains under analysis.

In this seminar course we will cover the development of and state-of-the-art systems in the human-centered computing field. Students will develop a critical understanding of HCC systems ranging from human state recognition and classification systems to human-in-the-loop systems to quantitative human behavior analysis systems. The course evaluation will include student presentations of published HCC work and a final HCC-based project.

Winter 2012: EECS 598 Electricity Networks and Markets

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Ian Hiskens
Prerequisites: EECS 463 or instructor permission

Course Description:
This course covers the principles and practices that underpin reliable and economical operation of power systems. [More Info]

Winter 2012: EECS 598: Electromechanics

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Heath Hofmann
Prerequisites: EECS 230 or equivalent or graduate standing

Course Description:
In this course we will discuss the analysis and design of electromechanical devices, with an emphasis on power and energy applications. Devices based upon mechanical forces generated by both electromagnetic fields and materials with electromechanical material properties will be considered. [More Info]

Winter 2012: EECS 598 Carbon Nanoelectronics and Nanophotonics

Course No.: EECS 598-003
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Zhaohui Zhong
Prerequisites: EECS 420 or instructor permission

Course Description:
Carbon based nanomaterials, in particular carbon nanotube and graphene, have generated great excitements over the past decade due to their unique electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. This special topic course introduces theories and experimental works on carbon nanotube and graphene based electronic and photonic devices. The course will also have two student labs of experimental testing of graphene nanoelectronics. [More Info]

Winter 2012: EECS 598-001 Nano-Optics

Course No.: 598-001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: John Schotland
Prerequisites: Graduate standing

Course Description:
Classical and quantum optics of the near-eld. Review of Maxwell's equations. Evanescent waves and radiation theory in the near eld. Lorentz model and optics of metals. Green's functions and plane-wave decompositions. Diffraction from small holes and arrays of small holes. Scattering from point scatterers and spheres. Method of coupled dipoles. Surface plasmons and plasmon polaritons. Near-eld microscopy. Coherence theory in the near-eld. Review of eld quantization. Spontaneous emission and Wigner-Weisskopf theory. Purcell effect. Fluorescence near surfaces. FRET. Casimir effect. The course is meant to be accessible to engineering and physics graduate students. [More Info]

Winter 2012: EECS 598-002 Power Electronic Design

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Juan Manuel Rivas Davila
Prerequisites: EECS 418 or instructor permission

Course Description:
In this course, we will study the practical issues related to the practical design of power electronic converters. We will also explore the tradeoffs involved in selecting among the different circuits used to convert ac to dc, dc to ac and back to dc over a wide range of power levels suitable for different applications. In Power Electronic Design, as a multidisciplinary field, we will discuss circuits, control, magnetic design, thermal management and semiconductors and put this knowledge in a very practical context. [More Info]

The Freescale Cup and EECS 461 (Embedded Control Systems)

Students in EECS 461 expanded on the skills developed in the course when they entered the Freescale Cup, a contest in intelligent car racing. It was a challenging and rewarding experience, and though they were up against more seasoned teams from China and Mexico they achieved first place among the U.S. teams. Go Blue! [with video] [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Revzen: Wired - Video: Robot Builds Other Robots From Foam

Revzen: IEEE Spectrum - Watch a Robot Build Other Robots out of Spray Foam

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

New research program aims to make better sense of the world

A new 5-year $2.5M research program funded by the National Science Foundation, led by Prof. Demos Teneketzis, aims to address fundamental issues that arise in networked systems so that they can operate with maximum efficiency. This is especially critical as individual sensing devices are scaled down to millimeter size. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Anastasopoulos, Achilleas  Control Systems  Environment  Networks and Networking  Pradhan, S. Sandeep  Sensors  Signal and Image Processing   Teneketzis, Demosthenis  Theory  

Revzen: New Scientist - Robot builds its own body from sprayable foam

mm-scale computing: EE Web - Millimeter Scale Energy Harvesting Based Sensors

Anne Itsuno Receives William E. Spicer Thomas N. Casselman Award

Anne Itsuno's research has been focused on HgCdTe-based semiconductor infrared photodetectors with applications in high performance thermal imaging and detection. The award is presented by the U.S. Workshop on the Physics and Chemistry of II-VI Materials. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Keynote speech makes an impact in China

Prof. Semyon Meerkov delivered a keynote lecture at the 2011 International Forum on Advanced Vehicle Technologies and Integration (VTI2011). Within 15 minutes it was translated into Chinese. Meerkov's book, Production Systems Engineering, is currently being translated into Chinese (available summer 2012).
Related Topics:  Meerkov, Semyon M.  

Research about a Resilient Sensor Network for Plants Recognized with Best Track Paper Award

Research involving the design of a resilient sensor network for use in a nuclear power plant was recognized at the 4th International Symposium on Resilient Control Systems as a Best Track Paper award. The paper, "Resilient Monitoring System: Design and Performance Analysis," was authored by H. Garcia, U-M students Naman Jhamaria and Heng Kuang, Wen-Chiao Lin (EE:Systems alumnus now at the Idaho National Laboratory), and Prof. Semyon M. Meerkov. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Meerkov, Semyon M.  Production Systems Engineering  Sensors  

Guo: The Cutting Edge - Colored Solar Cells Boost E-Reader Efficiency and Create Energy-Harvesting Light Displays

Guo: Solar Novus Today - Solar Energy Harvesting of Waste Heat from Displays

Guo: Chem Eruope.com - Colored solar cells could make display screens more efficient

Guo: Laser Focus World - Grating-based pixel-color filters convert wasted LCD light to electricity

Guo: Plastic Electronics - Photovoltaic colour filters could enhance display efficiency

Guo: CBS Detroit.com - Colored Solar Cells Could Make Display Screens More Efficient

Guo: MIT Technology Review - Energy-Harvesting Displays

Mina Rais-Zadeh Receives 2011 EDS Early Career Award

Prof. Mina Rais-Zadeh has been selected to receive a 2011 IEEE Electron Devices Society (EDS) Early Career Award, which honors an outstanding IEEE EDS Graduate of the Last Decade (GOLD). Her research has been focused on the development of a new class of passive RF MEMS technology, which has resulted in five patents and several publications. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  

Colored solar cells could make display screens more efficient

A new kind of screen pixel developed by Prof. Jay Guo doubles as a solar cell and could boost the energy efficiency of cell phones and e-readers. The technology could also potentially be used in larger displays to make energy-harvesting billboards or decorative solar panels. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Displays  Electronic devices  Energy  Guo, L. Jay  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Modernizing the Nations Electric Grid for Alternative Energy

Prof. Ian Hiskens will be developing the technology as well as a strategy that will allow the nation's grid system to accommodate large-scale alternative energy sources, such as wind and solar power, through a $1.4M grant from the Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Alternative Energy  Energy  Grid  Hiskens, Ian  Power & Energy  

Rand: AOL Energy - Solar Discovery Shakes Century-Old Science

Testing the commercial potential of organic solar cells

Prof. Steve Forrest will be investigating next-generation technology in the area of organic photovoltaics that may lead to paints or windows that act as solar cells to power vehicles and homes. The research is funded through the Dept. of Energy's SunShot Initiative. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Alternative Energy  Energy  Forrest, Stephen  Solar Cell Technology  

Heather Ferguson Awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Heather is a first year electrical engineering graduate student, and plans to conduct research in the area of optical science. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  

Laura Freyman Awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Laura is an electrical engineering student and member of the Michigan Integrated Circuits Laboratory (MICL). She will pursue her studies with Prof. Dennis Sylvester. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  

Grizzle: Live Science - Meet MABEL

LNF E-Beam Lithography System: Micro Manufacturing - E-Beam Lithography System with Exclusive Capability: Another Jewel among the Leading-Edge Equipme

Grizzle: IEEE Spectrum - Video Tuesday: BigDog, MABEL, and Quadrotors Landing on Quadrotors

Powering breakthrough technologies

The technology behind successful startup company Ambiq Micro (2010) has its roots in ECE at Michigan, where faculty and students continue to lead the way in mm-scale computing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Energy  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  Technology Transfer  

Guo: ZeitNews (Energy) - Energy-Harvesting Displays

Najafi-Aktakka: Wall Street Journal - Giant Nuclear Mutant Cyborg Insects of Doom

Najafi-Aktakka: IEEE Spectrum - Micro Energy Harvesters Will Make Cyborg Insects Unstoppable

Najafi-Aktakka: Physorg.com - Cyborg insects generate power for their own neural control

Najafi-Aktakka: Next Big Future - Mechanical Energy Scavenging from Flying Insects

Next-generation Systems Information Theory

Called Value-centered information theory for adaptive learning, inference, tracking, and exploitation, this MURI led by Prof. Al Hero has the goal of laying the foundation for a new systems information theory for next-generation autonomous and adaptive sensing systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  Information Technology  Nadakuditi, Rajesh Rao  Networks and Networking  Sensors  Signal and Image Processing   Theory  

Islam: Concentrate - U-M researchers develop high-tech laser for acne treatment, body fat remova

Lindsay Allen and John Broderick Receive Best Application Award

Lindsay Allen (PhD EE:S '10) and John Broderick (EE:S PhD Candidate) received the Best Application Paper Award at the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Automation Science and Engineering (CASE), for successfully applying Allen's Anomaly Detection method to data supplied by Ford Motor Company. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Fikadu Dagefu Receives 2011 Lincoln Lab Fellowship

Dagefu's research interests include devising efficient models for near-ground wave propagation and scattering in complex indoor and urban scenarios. The applications for such models include wireless channel characterization, radar through-wall imaging and distributed sensor networks for environmental sensing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

New NSF Center for Photonic and Multiscale Nanomaterials

Prof. Ted Norris will direct the new $13M Center that will develop high-tech materials that manipulate light in new ways, leading to advances in invisibility cloaks, nanoscale lasers, efficient lighting, and quantum computers. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  CPHOM  Lasers  Lighting  Metamaterials  Norris, Theodore B.  Quantum Computing  Quantum Science and Devices  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Yoonmyung Lee Receives 2011 Intel Corporation PhD Fellowship

Yoonmyung Lee, PhD student in electrical engineering, was selected to receive a 2011 Intel Corporation PhD Fellowship to pursue his research in various design challenges in circuits for future mm-scale ultra-low power wireless sensor systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Silvio Savarese Authors Book in the Field of Computer Vision

The book, Representations and Techniques for 3D Object Recognition and Scene Interpretation, "introduces major concepts in 3D scene and object representation and inference from still images." Prof. Savarese directs the Vision Lab at U-M. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Robotics and Computer Vision  Savarese, Silvio  

Grizzle and MABEL on Fox2News: U of Ms MABEL the Robot Shows Off Her Moves

Islam: ABC Action News - New Lasers May Treat Acne

Hero: The Wall Street Journal - Wide Gap Found In Immune Responses Of People Exposed To The Flu

Hero: MSNBC - Why some people dont get the flu

Hero: Science News - Genes may explain who gets sick from flu

Grizzle: CBS News - Meet Mabel: The robot that does a 9-minute mile

Grizzle: Popular Science - Mabel the Robot Sets Speed Record For Bipedal Running

Grizzle: IEEE Spectrum - MABEL Bipedal Robot is Fast Enough to Run You Down

U-M, ARM Extend Research Collaboration to Explore Limits of Low Power Computing

ARM has renewed a research agreement with the U-M to pursue advances in ultra-low energy and sustainable computing. The five-year, $5 million extension of the partnership will significantly expand research activities. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  

New laser could treat acne with telecom technology

A laser developed by Prof. Mohammed Islam is designed to melt fat without burning surrounding tissue. It could potentially be used to treat acne. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Health  Islam, Mohammed  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  

Breakthrough: Researchers find wide gap in immune responses of people who did or didnt get the flu after exposure

Prof. Al Hero and colleagues in medicine and genomics are using genomics to begin to unravel what in our complex genomic data accounts for why some get sick while others don't. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Big Data  Genetics  Health  Hero, Alfred  Signal and Image Processing   

New Techniques in Medical Informatics Lead to Improved Diagnosis of MDS

Research by Prof. Al Hero and colleagues in the area of medical informatics is leading to better diagnosis and prognosis of patients with serious blood borne diseases. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Big Data  Genetics  Health  Hero, Alfred  Signal and Image Processing   

Making smart dust a reality

EECS faculty are embarking on a new NSF funded project to make millimeter-scale computing (aka smart dust) a widespread reality through the integration of circuits, sensors, and software on mm-scale platforms. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Energy  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  Technology Transfer  

Guo: Technology Review - Energy-Harvesting Displays

Sensors in the soil help engineers understand climate change

Profs. Moghaddam, Liu, and Teneketzis are involved in research that will increase understanding of how global ecosystems function, and ultimately global climate change. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Liu, Mingyan  Networks and Networking  Remote Sensing  Sensors  Teneketzis, Demosthenis  Wireless Communications  

MABEL is now the worlds fastest two-legged robot with two knees

Jessy Grizzle's robot MABEL can now run, a feat that represents the height of agility and efficiency for a two-legged machine. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Gyemin Lee Receives Best Paper Award for Research in Machine Learning for Biomedical Diagnosis

Mr. Lee is a PhD student in EE:Systems studying with Prof. Clay Scott. His paper provides an automated process for flow cytometry. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Health  Machine Learning  Medical diagnosis  Scott, Clayton D.  Signal and Image Processing   

Nonlinear Optics at 50: A Symposium

As the birthplace of nonlinear optics, Michigan is proud to host a one-day symposium on October 26th which will bring together some of the pioneers in the field and showcase the current state of the art in nonlinear optics. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

Xueyang Duan Receives First Prize for Research in Soil Moisture Sensing

Doctoral student Xueyang Duan took First Prize in the Student Paper Contest of the 2011 IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Remote Sensing  Sensors  

Connor Field: Ars Technica - How one undergrad built the largest solar farm in Michigan

Carmon: Nature Communications - Stimulated optomechanical excitation of surface acoustic waves in a microdevice

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

Grbic-Forrest: MSNBC - Mass Production Ahead for Smallest Possible Wi-Fi Antenna

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Grbic-Forrest: Smartplant - Tiny, powerful antennas could transform mobile devices

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Yoon: Gizmag - Implant could wirelessly relay brain signals to paralyzed limbs

Rand: Green Tech World - University of Michigan Researchers Create Solar Power without Solar Cells

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

Russell Willmot Awarded IEEE Fellowship

Russell Willmot has been awarded the IEEE Life Member Graduate Study Fellowship in Electrical Engineering for his work in the area of RF Circuits and Applied Electromagnetics. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Grbic-Forrest: Innovation News Daily - Mass Production Ahead for Smallest Possible Wi-Fi Antenna

Grbic-Forrest: WWJ-CBS Detroit - UM: New Method To Produce Tiny Antennas Could Improve Wireless Electronics

Grbic-Forrest: Mega Tech News - Radical Antenna Design May Shrink Future Wireless Gizmos

Grbic-Forrest: Futurity - Antenna shrinks. Phone soon to follow?

Grbic-Forrest: R&D Magazine - Using imprint processing to mass-produce tiny antennas could improve wireless electronics

Yoon: Discovery - Brain Implant Helps Control Prosthetic Limbs By Thought

Using imprint processing to mass-produce tiny antennas could improve wireless electronics

Prof. Anthony Grbic and Prof. Stephen Forrest, with PhD student Carl Pfeiffer, have found a way to mass-produce antennas so small that they approach the fundamental minimum size limit for their bandwidth, or data rate, of operation. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics  Electronic devices  Forrest, Stephen  Grbic, Anthony  

Forrest: Jerusalem Post - Useable solar technology will be ready in about 5 years

Yoon: MIT Technology Review - Could This Brain Implant Revive Paralyzed Limbs?

Prof. Semyon Meerkov and Colleagues Author Book on Quasilinear Control

Prof. Semyon Meerkov co-authored the textbook Quasilinear Control: Performance Analysis and Design of Feedback Systems with Nonlinear Sensors and Actuators. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Meerkov, Semyon M.  Sensors  

Yoon: Nano Patents and Innovations - Non-invasive brain implant could someday translate thoughts into movement

Yoon: ubergizmo - BioBolt relays information to paralyzed limb from brain down the road

Yoon: Examiner - BioBolt Hope for the paraplegic and more?

Yoon: Psychology Today - BioBolt: The Next Generation of Brain-Machine Interfaces

Yoon: WWJ - UM Brain Implant Could Turn Thoughts Into Movement

Student teams earn prizes in EECS 425: Integrated Microsystems Laboratory

Students earned prizes for their final projects in EECS 425: Integrated Microsystems Lab. The two winning teams built a micro-robotic arm and a MEMS variable optical attenuator. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Sung Ho Park Receives 2011 IEEE MTT-S Scholarship

Sung Ho Park, undergraduate EE student, received a scholarship from the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society to pursue terahertz research under the direction of Prof. Mona Jarrahi. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

A minimally-invasive brain implant to translate thoughts into movement

Prof. Euisik Yoon is developing a minimally-invasive brain implant to detect and wirelessly transmit the brain's neural signals. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Brain  Health  MEMS and Microsystems  Medical diagnosis  Wise, Kensall  Yoon, Euisik  

Morteza Nick Receives Best Paper Award at IMS2011

Morteza Nick (PhD EE 2011, exp.) received the Best Paper Award from the Int. Microwave Symposium for his paper in which he introduced a new voltage-controlled-oscillator design technique. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Mortazawi, Amir  RF, Microwave, MM-wave Circuits  

2011 EECS Promotions

Congratulations Robert Dick, Tony Grbic, Jay Guo, Wei Lu, Scott Mahlke, Dragomir Radev, and Martin Strauss on your recent promotions! [Full Story]

AMD/Michigan Student Design Contest

With projects exploring techniques in energy efficient computing, two student teams in the graduate course VLSI Design II earned prizes in the annual AMD/Michigan Design Contest. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Fall 2011: EECS 650 - Channel Coding Theory and Applications

Course No.: 650
Credit Hours:
Instructor: Prof. Achilleas Anastasopoulos
Prerequisites: EECS 501

Course Description:
Classical coding theory (which was founded almost 50 years ago) studies codes from theiralgebraic viewpoint. It served communication theorists and practitioners well, but essentiallyfailed to reach the goal set by information theory, i.e., to provide codes that come close tochannel capacity. However, 15 years ago, channel coding theory was revolutionized by theinvention of turbo codes and the re-invention of low-density parity-check codes. This revolution led to the birth of the new subfield of modern coding theory.

In the first part of the course, we will review some basic results from information andcoding theory (e.g., error exponents) in order to see what is the best one should expect froma good code. In the second part, we will study families of good codes, collectively referred toas turbo-like codes. Their asymptotic and finite-length performance, and their encoding anddecoding complexity will be studied. This investigation will conclude by looking at familiesof codes that provably approach the capacity of the binary erasure channel and we will askthe question of whether everything that Shannon predicted has been achieved.

The third part of the course deals with the multi-antenna wireless fading channel, whichpromises bandwidth efficiencies on the order of tens of bits per second per Hertz. Its capacitywill be investigated and families of space-time codes will be introduced and analyzed.

In the last part of this course a few topics in modern coding theory that have the potentialto drive the state of the art in the next twenty years will be presented. Such topics includechannel coding with transmitter side information, coding in the presence of feedback, connectionsbetween communications and control, coding for multi-user channels, recent capacityachieving codes such as polar codes, etc. [Full Story]

E-Waste event is tomorrow at Pioneer H.S.

Free e-Waste Events May 2011: Recycle ResponsiblyPublic e-Waste Event Saturday, May 7, 9am2pm at Pioneer High School, 601 W. Stadium Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48103 [Full Story]

Student teams earn prizes in EECS 556: Image Processing

Two teams earned prizes in the graduate level course, EECS 556: Image Processing, thanks to the sponsorship of KLA-Tencor. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Prof. Wayne Stark and Changhun Bae Receive 2011 JCN Best Paper Award

A 2010 paper related to energy efficiency in wireless sensor networks by Prof. Wayne Stark and EE:S graduate student Changhun Bae was named the 2011 Journal of Communications Best Paper. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Communications  Networks and Networking  Sensors  Stark, Wayne E.  Wireless Communications  

EECS Department Recognizes Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors, Instructional Aides

On April 27, EECS recognized exemplary Graduate Student Instructors and Instructional Aides at the annual GSI awards luncheon. [Full Story]

Najafi-Aktakka: PhysOrg - Most powerful millimeter-scale energy harvester generates electricity from vibrations

Najafi-Aktakka: Next Big Future - Piezoelectric MEMS boosts vibration harvester by ten times

Najafi-Aktakka: EE Times - Piezoelectric MEMS boosts vibration harvester

Soloway: eSchool News - Mobile Learning: Not Just Laptops Any More

Soloway: THE Journal - Will Smart Phones Eliminate the Digital Divide?

Iverson Bell Awarded NSF Fellowship for Research in Space Propulsion

Iverson Bell, EE PhD student, received a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship for his research in electrodynamic, propellantless propulsion for Space applications. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  

Most powerful millimeter-scale energy harvester generates electricity from vibrations

Prof. Khalil Najafi and EE doctoral student Erkan Aktakka have built the most efficient device to generate energy from vibrations in its class. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Energy  Energy Scavenging  MEMS and Microsystems  Najafi, Khalil  Sensors  

MEMStim takes first prize in the Michigan Business Challenge

Angelique Johnson (MSE PhD EE '07, '11) and her new company, MEMStim, took top honors (including Best Business and Outstanding Presentation) in the 2011 Michigan Business Challenge and Eugene Applebaum Dare to Dream Grant program for U-M startups. Reveal Automation also earns prize. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Fall 2011: Computation for Predictive and Personalized Medicine

Course No.: EECS598
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Zeeshan Syed
Prerequisites: EECS281/STATS412 (or equivalent with permission of instructor)

Course Description:
This course provides a multi-disciplinary, hands-on introduction to designing computational systems to address the needs of modern medicine, through real-world projects and clinical/industrial partners. The goal of this course is to develop the knowledge and skills needed to create computational systems for predictive and personalized medicine that can have translational impact in different application domains (e.g., cardiology, psychiatry, critical care). The class consists of lectures and discussions, with students focusing on a semester long project to develop a solution to an important clinical challenge in close collaboration with local partners who are experts in relevant fields. Topics include the main concepts of decision analysis, predictive modeling, data management, biostatistics, and disease pathophysiology. Emphasis will be placed on the advantages and disadvantages of using these methods in real-world systems.

2011 St. Georges Day Feast - an EECS Tradition!

In a tradition that dates back to 1987, faculty served lunch to students, the Chairs slew a dragon, awards were presented, and a good time was had by all. [Full Story]

Fall 2011: EECS 418 Power Electronics

Course No.: 418
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor: H. Hofmann
Prerequisites: EECS 215 and EECS 216, and preceded or accompanied by EECS 320, or graduate standing

Course Description:
Lectures: Monday & Wednesday 3-4:30 Lab: Thursday or Friday 3-6



Meeting the future's energy and environmental challenges will require the efficient conversion of energy. For example, renewable forms of energy must be integrated with the nation's 60Hz AC electricity grid. Furthermore, hybrid electric vehicles require efficient energy conversion in order to improve their fuel economy over conventional vehicles. Power electronic circuits are a key component of these systems. Power electronic circuits are circuits that efficiently convert one form of electrical energy (e.g., AC, DC) into another.

This course will discuss the circuit topologies used to efficiently convert AC electrical power to DC, DC power from one voltage to another, and DC power to AC power. The components used in these circuits (e.g., diodes, transistors, capacitors, inductors) will also be covered in detail. A key aspect of power electronic circuits is the control algorithm used to achieve the desired behavior (e.g., output voltage regulation), and so control theory as it applies to these circuits will also be discussed. [More Info]

Rand: Forbes - Solar Power Without Solar Cells?

Rand: Wired.co.uk - Lights magnetic field could make solar power without solar cells

Rand: Christian Science Monitor - Solar power: breakthrough could herald big drop in costs

Solar power without solar cells: A hidden magnetic effect of light could make it possible

A dramatic and surprising magnetic effect of light discovered by Prof. Stephen Rand's group could lead to solar power without traditional semiconductor-based solar cells. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Energy  Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  Solar Cell Technology  

Connor Field is growing energy on a solar farm

Connor is busy completing two degrees, EE and Economics, as he prepares for the field of alternative energy. He has already built one solar energy farm. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Congratulations to Dennis Grimard and Becky Turanski for their staff awards

Dr. Dennis Grimard and Becky Turanski received CoE awards for their consistently exemplary service to the University and external community. Read more about Dennis Grimard. Read more about Becky Turanski.

Tanya Das earns poetry prize as she prepares for graduate school

Tanya Das, EE undergrad student, responded to the invitation to write poetry for the Roger M. Jones Poetry Contest, and came away with a prize. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Safer Medical Imaging with Microwaves

Prof. Mahta Moghaddam and her group describe and demonstrate a successful experiment in research that could lead to safer medical imaging practices in hospitals and labs. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Chris Berry Awarded MSGC Fellowship

Chris Berry, an electrical engineering graduate student, was awarded this fellowship for research in the area of terahertz technology for Space applications. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Prof. Grbic Receives USNC/URSI Booker Fellowship

This triennial award is presented to a U.S. scientist for outstanding contributions to radio science by the U.S Nat. Committee for the Int. Union of Radio Science. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Grbic, Anthony  

Fall 2011: VLSI Digital Signal Process Systems

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Zhengya Zhang
Prerequisites: EECS 427 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
Digital signal processing (DSP) systems have been enabled by the advances in very-large scale-integrated (VLSI) technologies. New DSP applications constantly impose new challenges on VLSI implementations. These implementations must satisfy real-time constraints imposed by the applications and must fit increasingly stringent area and power envelope. This course will survey methodologies needed to design efficient and high-performance custom or semi-custom VLSI systems for DSP applications. The primary focus of the course is on design of architectures, algorithms, and circuits, which can be operated with small area and low power consumption to deliver a high speed and functional performance. [More Info]

Raj Nadakuditi Receives ONR Young Investigator Award

Prof. Nadakuditi will investigate the fundamental statistical limits of quiet signal detection, estimation and classification in the context of undersea signal processing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Nadakuditi, Rajesh Rao  Signal and Image Processing   Theory  

Al Hero Receives Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award

Prof. Hero was recognized for being an internationally recognized expert in the field of signal and image processing, an established leader in the professional community, and a distinguished educator. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  

Fall 2011: Radio Frequency MEMS

Course No.: EECS 598-001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Mina Rais-Zadeh
Prerequisites: EECS 414 (introduction to MEMS) or permission of the instructor

Course Description:
* Introduction to RF and RF MEMS* Overview of MEMS processing, both silicon and non-silicon based* Design and high-frequency modeling of MEMS structures using HFSS* Electrostatic, piezoelectric and magnetic actuation for RF MEMS*Reconfigurable architectures- Technology trends* Semester-long team project on a topic related to course material

Micro-electromechanical devices and systems (MEMS) can greatly enhance the performance of RF integrated circuit as they can operate with much lower power in a smaller size compared to their integrated counterparts. This course covers the operation principle, design, fabrication, and technology trend of high-frequency micromechanical devices with focus on those most used for communication application. Devices and systems covered in this course include resonators, switches, filters, phase-shifters, tunable passives, and reconfigurable modules. The need for high-Q devices will be explained in detail and the physical phenomena that limit the performance and scaling of RF MEMS will be discussed. In addition, students will learn about accurate modeling of MEMS in electrical domain, transduction mechanism commonly used in MEMS, and design techniques used to achieve high performance (high power handling, high linearity, low-loss, etc). [More Info]

Watch MABEL on Discovery Channel Canada - Daily Planet

MABEL's story starts at the 5 minute mark. Watch as Jessy Grizzle shows how his group's work has MABEL navigating the highest steps yet. Don't miss her new shoes at the end. Video
Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Fall 2011: Embedded System Design and Synthesis

Course No.: 598-3
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor: Robert P. Dick
Prerequisites: (EECS 370 or EECS 373) and (EECS 280) or equivalent or permission of instructor.

Description: Embedded systems are computers within other devices such as automobiles and medical devices. This course will survey the field of embedded system analysis, design, and synthesis and introduce open research topics in the automatic design of reliable, high-performance,low power consumption, inexpensive embedded systems, e.g., smartphones, distributed sensing systems, and multimedia devices. Commonly, half of those attending are graduate students and half are undergraduate students, who typically do very well if ambitious.

Required Text: None

Reference Texts:

  • Wayne Wolf, "Computers as Components: Principles of Embedded Computing System Design", Morgan Kaufman, 2001.
  • Robert Dick, Multiobjective Synthesis of Low-Power Real-Time Distributed Embedded Systems, Dept. of Electrical Engineering,Ph.D. dissertation, Princeton University, 2002.

Readings: Numerous research papers and book chapters will be assigned.Students will write brief summaries of the assigned articles.

Course Goals: Prepare students for research in embedded system synthesis and design. Introduce real-time systems and embedded operating systems basics. Complete original projects that may serve as foundations for further research.

Prerequisites by Topic:
  • Computer programming
  • Algorithm analysis and design
  • Fundamentals of logic design and computer organization


Lecture topics:
  • Introduction to embedded systems
  • Embedded system applications
  • Overview of heterogeneous multiprocessor system-on-chip design problem
  • Models and languages
  • Formal methods for designing reliable embedded systems
  • Heterogeneous multiprocessor synthesis
  • Reliability optimization
  • Real-time systems
  • Scheduling
  • Compilation techniques for embedded systems
  • Embedded operating systems
  • Low-power and power-aware design
  • Novel fabrication techniques for compact and low-power embedded systems
  • Emerging applications (e.g., sensing and actuation intensive applications and user-aware computing)
  • Hardware and software data compression for use in embedded systems
  • Review and student presentations on short projects


Projects: Students will complete one small project and one main project. The instructor will propose a number of possible small project topics. Students may select from among these or propose their own ideas. Small project reports and presentations will be required.The main course project is often an extended version of the small project, but this is not required.

Examples of previous projects include commercially used operating system modules for increasing available memory in smartphone-class embedded systems, a distributed air quality sensing and reporting system, and security-enhancing techniques to implicitly determine whether an embedded system is being used by its owner or a thief,hardware to improve operating lifespans of distributed sensing systems, and scheduling and synthesis algorithms to improve FPGA performance.

Exams: There will be a final exam covering the assigned reading.

Grading:
  • Projects 50%
  • Presentations 25%
  • Literature summaries 10%
  • Exams 15%
[Full Story]

Fall 2011: Auditory Displays and Interfaces

Course No.: EECS 498-005
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor: Wakefield
Prerequisites: EECS 281 or GUI programming proficiency in Matlab

Course Description:
From the honking of a car horn to the immersion of 3-D audio, sound is used to display information to users as well as to support a user's exploration of alternative (virtual) realities. Auditory Displays and Interfaces introduces key concepts in human-computer interfaces, acoustics, signal processing, auditory perception, and psychometric theory which are important in the design and performance characterization of sonic user interfaces (SUIs). A particular SUI development platform (written in Matlab) is presented and used throughout the course to support each of the concepts taught through programming exercises. Student performance is assessed on the basis of homework/small programming projects, exams, and an individual project.

Mahta Moghaddam Honored with U-M Faculty Recognition Award

Prof. Moghaddam, a professor in the RADLAB, was recognized for her excellence in research, teaching, and service. Her research ranges from environmental sensing to medical imaging using radar. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Jamie Phillips Receives University Undergraduate Teaching Award

This award recognizes faculty in the early stages of their career for their outstanding ability in teaching undergraduate students.

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Phillips, Jamie D.  

Al Hero Receives Best Paper Award for Research in System Feasibility Studies

The paper will be presented at the 2011 International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing in May 2011. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

U-M Alumni and Friends Mixer at ISSCC 2011

The University of Michigan Alumni and Friends mixer at the 2011 International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) reunited faculty, students, colleagues and friends at this annual event. See photos and other information by following the link. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Najafi-Wise: Ann Arbor.com - U-M engineers honored for pioneering efforts, work with high-tech start-ups

Engineers rebuilding Liberias universities and infrastructure

USAID is funding a 5 yr, $18.5M effort to rebuild Liberia after 15 years of civil war. Leading the engineering effort at U-M is Prof. Herb Winful. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Winful, Herbert  

Tony Grbic Honored as MTT-S Outstanding Young Engineer

Prof. Grbic will receive this award from the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society "for outstanding early career contributions to the microwave profession."

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Grbic, Anthony  

Winful: RTI Int - RTI International to Strengthen Liberian Workforce Through New Project in Higher Education

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Winful, Herbert  

Galvanauskas: Crains Detroit Business - Arbor Photonics seeks spinoff success with more powerful lasers

[Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

MABEL the robot to appear on Discovery Channel

Discovery Channel Canada is doing a documentary about MABEL, and captured experimentation of new walking algorithms live on camera. One of MABEL's new features is the addition of more "human" feet to better mimic the classic heel strike, flat foot, toe roll motion of human walking. The feature is expected to be out within a few weeks. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Ted Norris Honored with Distinguished Graduate Mentor Award

Prof. Ted Norris, Director of CUOS and the Optics and Photonics Lab, received this honor for sustained efforts sustained efforts as advisor, teacher, advocate, sponsor, and role model to doctoral students. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Norris, Theodore B.  

Millimeter-scale computing: Fox News-World's Smallest Computer Created

Millimeter-scale computing: MSNBC-World's smallest computer watches you - from within

Millimeter-scale computing: Computerworld-Researchers create computer that fits on a pen tip

Millimeter-scale computing: EE Times-Millimeter-scale all-in-one computers debut

Millimeter computing: Discover-World's Teeniest, Tiniest Computer Fits on the 'N' of a Penny

Prof. Stephen Forrest discusses solar power role as alternative energy source

Stephen Forrest, U-M VP for research and EECS solar energy researcher, disccuses whether it will be possible to meet President Obama's clean energy goal. Listen to the podcast
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Toward computers that fit on a pen tip: New technologies usher in the millimeter-scale computing era

An implantable eye pressure monitor that is a complete millimeter-scale system, and a compact radio for wireless sensor networks are key advancements to millimeter-scale computing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Energy  Environment  Health  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

Three EECS Teams are Winners in 2011 DAC/ISSCC Student Design Contest

The projects focus on near-threshold 3D computing, a flexible wireless receiver for multiple communication standards, and a clock-harvesting receiver for wireless sensor nodes. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Graduate Students  Mudge, Trevor  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

Mona Jarrahi Receives NSF CAREER Award

Prof. Mona Jarrahi will pursue research in the area of Next Generation Photomixer-Based Terahertz Sources. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Jarrahi, Mona  Terahertz Technology  

Hongwei Liao, EE:Systems Grad Student, Awarded Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship

Mr. Liao received this prestigious fellowship for his research in applying discrete control theory to computing problems, within the context of the Gadara project. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Jungsuek Oh, EE Grad Student, Awarded Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship

Mr. Oh received this prestigious fellowship for his research in miniaturized and structurally embedded antennas for small wireless platforms. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Mark Kushner Elected to the National Academy of Engineering

Prof. Mark Kushner was recognized by the NAE for his contributions to low-temperature plasmas for semiconductors, optics, and thin-film manufacturing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  

The Future Looks Electric

As carmakers scramble to hire engineers, according to a recent article in the Detroit Free Press, students at Michigan will receive the training they need to enter the field. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Sonal Verma Receives Microsoft Scholarship

EE graduate student Sonal Verma was awarded the Microsoft Graduate Women's Scholarship to pursue her studies in wireless, embedded and networked systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Xi Chen and Prof. Robert Dick Receive DATE Best Paper Award

Chen and Dick were honored for their work in fast thermal analysis for use in temperature-aware integrated circuit design, along with co-author Prof. Li Shang, U. Colorado. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Dick, Robert  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  

Mina Rais-Zadeh Receives NSF CAREER Award

Prof. Rais-Zadeh will pursue research in the area of MEMS Reconfigurable Filters for Multi-Band Low-Power Radios. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  MEMS and Microsystems  RF, Microwave, MM-wave Circuits  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  

Najafi, Wise named Distinguished University Innovators

Prof. Najafi and Prof. Wise are recognized for their role in developing breakthrough technologies in MEMS, leading to numerous startup companies. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Najafi, Khalil  Technology Transfer  Wise, Kensall  

Five EECS Faculty Recognized with College of Engineering Awards

Valeria Bertacco, Michael Flynn, Eric Michielssen, H.V. Jagadish, and Michael Bailey have received awards from the College. Congratulations! [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Flynn, Michael  Jagadish, HV  Michielssen, Eric  

EECS Students Win 2010 U-M Mobile Apps Challenge with HiJack

EECS students took a number of awards, including first place, in the Fall 2010 U-M Mobile Apps Challenge. [Full Story]

Zhengya Zhang Receives NSF CAREER Award

Prof. Zhang will pursue research in the area of High Performance, Energy-Efficient Communication and Storage. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Information Technology  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Zhang, Zhengya  

Silvio Savarese Receives NSF CAREER Award

Prof. Savarese will pursue research in the area of computer vision. He directs the Computer Vision Group. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Robotics and Computer Vision  Savarese, Silvio  

Jackie Vitaz Receives Top Prize at USNC/URSI

Dr. Jacquelyn Vitaz was the First Prize Winner for her paper in the area of applied electromagnetics, entitled, Techniques for Enhanced Distinction of Planar Retro-Reflective Arrays. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Sarabandi, Kamal  Security (national and personal safety)  

EECS 413 students earn prizes for their final projects

Two teams in EECS 413, Monolithic Amplifier Circuits, were awarded cash prizes for their designs by Cirrus Logic Inc. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

2010 AMD/Michigan Student Design Contest

Three teams were awarded prizes for Best Overall, Most Innovative, and Best Engineering projects in the annual contest, held this past term for students in the VLSI Design I class. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

WIMS: Pentagon Brief - Chip Sized Sensor to Detect Dangerous Chemicals