Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE Research News

U-M Leading International Neurotechnology 'Dream Team' for Brain Research and Education

A "dream team" of experts in sensors, electronics, data analysis and neuroscience has been awarded a $5 million grant to help unravel the mysteries of the brain and cross-train an international group of neuroscientists and engineers. The project is directed by Prof. Euisik Yoon, and includes experts and partner institutions around the world. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  International Prog. for the Adv. of Neurotechnology  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Sensors  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Wise, Kensall  Yoon, Euisik  

The Future of Data Science: Kicking Off U-Ms Proactive Step into an Exploding Field

Researchers from around the nation gathered at Rackham on October 6 to celebrate the official launch of Michigans $100M Data Science Initiative. Central to this program is the new Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS), which aims to make sense of the massive datasets researchers in every field now have at their disposal. The symposium, titled The Future of Data Science: A Convergence of Academia, Industry, and Government, was an all-day event featuring representatives of many major industries and academic institutions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Big Data  Data Centers  Health  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Lab-Systems  Michielssen, Eric  

Phosphorescent OLEDs glow deep blue - almost ready for prime time

A new molecule developed by researchers at the University of Michigan and the University of Southern California shines a deep blue that is close to meeting the stringent brightness requirements of the National Television Systems Committee. "Bright, deep blue, phosphorescent emitters have been very elusive. Our work has resulted in deep, display quality blue at very high efficiency and extremely high brightness," said Stephen Forrest, the Peter A. Franken Distinguished University Professor of Engineering and Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Getting the Light Out (of OLEDs)

Researchers at the University of Michigan have discovered a way to get 50% more light out of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), bringing them one step closer to more widespread adoption as a general lighting source, while increasing their value in displays. OLED technologies, a nearly $16B market, are already found in more than 750 million smartphone and tablet screens worldwide. The appearance of OLED technology in the world of general lighting is steadily growing, and as of 2014 can even be found in lighting fixtures sold at Home Depot. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lighting  

Layered Graphene Beats the Heat

An international team of researchers, led by Ted Norris, Gerard A. Mourou Professor, have found that a layered form of graphene can expel heat efficiently, which is an important feature for its potential applications in building small and powerful electronics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graphene  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  

Inspired by art, lightweight solar cells track the sun

Solar cells capture up to 40 percent more energy when they can track the sun across the sky, but conventional, motorized trackers are too heavy and bulky for pitched rooftops and vehicle surfaces. Now, by borrowing from kirigami, the ancient Japanese art of paper cutting, researchers at the University of Michigan have developed solar cells that can have it both ways. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy  Environment  Forrest, Stephen  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Research  Solar Cell Technology  

Glucose Monitoring with Lasers

200 million estimated people with diabetes might one day utilize laser research going on at the University of Michigan to painlessly read their glucose levels. Professor Mohammed Islam is leading the reconstruction of super continuum lasers he designed to aid the military detect the chemical composition in camouflage nets and explosives into a non-invasive tool to measure a teaspoon of glucose in the blood system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Islam, Mohammed  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers  

Improving the image quality of ultra-low dose CT scans with big data

Prof. Jeffrey Fessler is collaborating with alumnus Prof. Yong Long on research that aims to provide high image quality CT scans while reducing the X-ray radiation dose to an ultra-low level. The team expects to achieve dramatically improved results by including big data analysis of existing CT images in their approach. Prof. Fessler's research in medical imaging is one of five joint projects to receive continued funding as part of the University of Michigan and Shanghai Jiao Tong University Collaborative Research Programs for Energy and Biomedical Technology. The program funds projects that have commercial potential and are likely to attract follow-on research funding from the U.S. and Chinese governments, as well as industry. [read the announcement in The University Record] [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Lab-Systems  Medical Imaging  

Next generation laser plasma accelerator

Michigan is part of a multi-institution collaboration to develop key laser technology that will enable the design a high-power, ultra-short-pulse laser system which is expected to enable new low-cost, compact accelerator-based light sources for a wide variety of biological, chemical, materials science, and security applications. The technology may also lead to compact, portable TeV (tera electron volt) linear colliders, and enable the same kind of research now being conducted in conventional accelerators, such as the 17 mile Large Hadron Collider, on a table top. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Center for Ultrafast Optical Science (CUOS)  Galvanauskas, Almantas  HERCULES  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  

Researching the Future of Remote Sensing

ECE researchers will explore the fundamental capabilities of remote sensing through a new grant funded by NASA. Directed by Kamal Sarabandi, Rufus S. Teesdale Professor of Engineering, the new program aims to create theoretical models for remote sensing of ice and snow. Specifically, the research seeks to develop a better understanding of wave propagation and scattering, and to improve tools for future monitoring. This work could feed into the development of new sensors for a variety of remote sensing applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Environment  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

New Michigan-Saudi Arabia Collaboration Promises Exciting New Research - Beginning with the Auto Industry

A new collaborative research center, called the Center of Excellence for Microwave Sensor Technology, has been established between ECE faculty and Saudi Arabias King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). The Center will be a major site for research in microwave sensor technology, with the first projects focusing on autonomous vehicles and novel approaches to electric vehicle charging. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Automotive industry  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Mud-Fueled Smart Sensors for the Bottom of the Ocean

If you put tiny electrodes in the mud on the ocean floor, you can harvest enough energy to power a tiny sensor platform that can monitor whats going on at those depths. The sensing platform draws just 2 nanowatts, and is part of a broader portfolio of work focused on powering electronic systems with low energy sources. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  

What makes cancer cells spread? New device offers clues

Why do some cancer cells break away from a tumor and travel to distant parts of the body? A team of oncologists and engineers from the University of Michigan teamed up to help understand this crucial question. Prof. Euisik Yoon led the engineering team that created a new device that is able to sort cells based on their ability to move. Cancer becomes deadly when it spreads, or metastasizes. Not all cells have the same ability to travel through the body, but researchers dont understand why. This study is a step towards coming to that understanding. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Yoon, Euisik  

Space Tethers Can Be Used to Fling Spacecraft Into Interplanetary Space

Brian Gilchrist is collaborating with NASA researchers and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory to develop space tethers - a means to "fling" spacecraft further into interplanetary space. Electromagnetic tethers on already-orbiting or space bound satellites could be used to move a spacecraft in space without any propellant whatsoever. The tether could be used to deorbit out-of-use spacecraft, push spacecraft from low Earth orbit into higher orbits, or even push spacecraft out of Earth's orbit altogether. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Gilchrist, Brian E.  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Designing Machines - Can we create machines who learn like we do?

Technology certainly seems smart now - phones listen and talk, computers interpret images and video - but in spite of that, the field of artificial intelligence might best be described as a hot mess: an assortment of intriguing pieces that have yet to be integrated into a truly intelligent system. This article in looks at some of those pieces and how they might fit together. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Laird, John  Lee, Honglak  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Michigan Micro Mote (M3) Makes History

Michigan Micro Mote (M3), the worlds smallest computer, is taking its place among other revolutionary accomplishments in the history of computing at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA. Measuring in at less than a half a centimeter, it is a fully autonomous computing system that acts as a smart sensing system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

EE Times Highlights ECE Research at ISSCC

EE Times offered 18 Views of ISSCC through photos of some of the most interesting and cutting-edge products and research shown at the event. They showcased research by Prof. Blaauw, Prof. Sylvester, and graduate student Wootaek Lim. The chip is an ARM Cortex-M0+ running off a 0.09mm2 solar cell that puts out 400 picowatts, thanks to novel circuits designed to suppress power leakage. Electronics360 previewed the work, calling it a stand-out paper. [Electronics360 preview]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Jason Corso Receives Google Faculty Research Award

Prof. Jason Corso received a 2015 Google Faculty Research Award to further his research in computational learning from instructional video content. His goal is to develop a consistent and reliable method for producing a visual and textual summary of any video that describes a process - from simple sandwich how-to's to more elaborate technical processes. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Robotics  

The Future of Solar: $1.3M to Advance Organic Photovoltaics

The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Michigan Engineering Professor Stephen Forrests group a $1.35 million Next Generation Photovoltaics grant earlier this fall, aimed at advancing the practical viability of organic photovoltaics, a carbon-based version of solar technology that promises to radically change the way the suns energy is collected. Forrest is the Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Physics and the former U-M Vice President of Research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

Yelin Kim Wins Best Student Paper Award at ACM Multimedia 2014 for Research in Facial Emotion Recognition

Yelin Kim has won the Best Student Paper Award at the 22nd ACM International Conference on Multimedia (ACM MM 2014) for her research in facial emotion recognition. The paper, "Say Cheese vs. Smile: Reducing Speech-Related Variability for Facial Emotion Recognition," was co-authored by her advisor, Prof. Emily Mower Provost. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Mower Provost, Emily  Signal and Image Processing   

Michigan and Prof. Forrest awarded photovoltaics R&D award from the U.S. Dept. of Energy SunShot Initiative

U-M was selected as part of the U.S. Dept. of Energy SunShot's "Next Generation Photovoltaics 3" program and was the only project awarded for organic photovoltaic ("OPV") research and development. Prof. Stephen Forrest said he very pleased to be able to continue his work on the SunShot Initiative. Forrest has achieved significant results in the area of organic photovoltaics, and believes they have the potential to redefine the cost structure of the solar industry and introduce solar power to untapped applications." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy  Forrest, Stephen  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

Yang Liu Receives Best Applications Paper Award for Cyber Security Research in Phishing

Yang Liu, Ph.D Candidate in Electrical Engineering:Systems, earned a Best Applications Paper Award from the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Data Science and Advanced Analytics (DSAA2014) for his recent research on phishing. His paper detailed his use of big data analysis to solve a major problem of cyber security [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Communications  Graduate Students  Liu, Mingyan  Security (Computing)  

Prof. Robert Dick to Apply Cyber Information to Air Quality Management

Prof. Robert Dick, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and specialist in embedded systems, received a CyberSEES grant to study the impact of weather and human activity on production of, and exposure to, ozone and other air pollutants. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dick, Robert  Embedded Computing and Systems  Environment  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Prof. Johanna Mathieu Working to Bring Power from Sustainable Sources to Your Home

ECE Prof. Johanna Mathieu received a grant under the NSF Cyber-Innovation for Sustainability Science and Engineering program to pursue "Data-driven approaches to managing uncertain load control in sustainable power systems." She is working on the problem of how best to integrate wind and solar power into the nation's established electrical grid system. The research may one day impact the nation's energy policy as it attempts to balance the cost of energy with the environmental impact of generating that energy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grid  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power & Energy  Wind Technology  

Prof. Becky Peterson Awarded DARPA Young Faculty Award to Investigate New Materials for Power Semiconductor Devices

Becky Peterson, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was recently awarded a 2014 DARPA Young Faculty Award for her research project, "Amorphous Oxide Thin Film Transistors for Switched-Mode Power Supplies." Such power supplies could potentially be used in a wide variety of wireless sensing and actuation systems, including those that deal with security and monitoring of the environment and medical conditions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Prof. Necmiye Ozay Awarded DARPA Young Faculty Award for Research in Cyber and Physical Systems

Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, has received a 2014 DARPA Young Faculty Award for her research project, Dynamics-based information extraction: a hybrid systems approach." Her research will impact the safety and security of cyber and physical systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Cyber-physical systems  Diversity and Outreach  Ozay, Necmiye  

Mapping the brain with lasers

Individual parts of the brain can be activated and de-activated by shining light on the neurons, and researchers are using this ability to chart how different areas of the brain function. To zoom in on individual neuron circuits within the brain, more precise light sources are needed. ECE professor Euisik Yoon is leading a team that will design and build these new light sources with a variety of lasers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  Health  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Yoon, Euisik  

Blue LED breakthrough for efficient electronics

In a step that could lead to longer battery life in smartphones and lower power consumption for large-screen televisions, Prof. Stephen Forrest and his team have extended the lifetime of blue organic light emitting diodes by a factor of 10. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Fighting lung cancer with faster image processing

A new $1.9 million research program led by Prof. Jeff Fessler seeks to make low-dose computed tomography scans a viable screening technique by speeding up the image reconstruction from half an hour or more to just five minutes.The advance could be particularly important for fighting lung cancers, as symptoms often appear too late for effective treatment. Prof. Thomas Wenisch is collaborating on the project. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Medical Imaging  Medical diagnosis  Signal and Image Processing   Wenisch, Thomas  

Kyu-Tae Lee Wins Best Poster Award for Colorful Solar Cells

ECE graduate student Kyu-Tae Lee received a Best Poster Award at the 40th Annual Michigan AVS Symposium. His poster described the creation of solar cell device structures that enable attractive multi-colored solar cells that can be used on windows and other interior and exterior surfaces. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Guo, L. Jay  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Sensors in the Soil (video)

Soil moisture information is just as important to NASA engineers as it is to local farmers. For example, this data is used to monitor climate patterns and predict landslides. Prof. Mingyan Liu is working on a system that will make collecting and analyzing this data more accurate. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Communications  Environment  Liu, Mingyan  Sensors  

Solving the Big Data Dilemma

Prof. Laura Balzano talks about how to get the best results from big collections of data. Science, healthcare, economics, infrastructure and government could be completely changed by effectively using big data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Balzano, Laura  Big Data  Environment  Health  Information Technology  Signal and Image Processing   

New graphene sensor technology for personal and environmental health

A new wearable vapor sensor could one day offer continuous disease monitoring for patients with diabetes, high blood pressure, anemia or lung disease. The new sensor, which can detect airborne chemicals either exhaled or released through the skin, would likely be the first wearable to pick up a broad array of chemical, rather than physical, attributes. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Environment  Medical diagnosis  Sensors  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Wearable electronics  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Optoelectronics: A practical polariton laser

In this article, the author describes the importance of Prof. Bhattacharya's room-temperature, eletrically injected polariton laser, stating that it, "represents an important step towards the practical implementation of polaritonic light sources. In many ways, the first report of a semiconductor laser device based on BoseEinstein condensation that is pumped electrically at room temperature opens a new era in optoelectronics. It may not be long before polaritonic devices start to claim their share of the optoelectronics market, just as double heterostructure devices did 40 years ago." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Optoelectronics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Shrinking the size of optical systems, exponentially

ECE researchers have developed a way to exponentially shrink the size of a system typically needed to control the polarization of light, while maintaining the high level of performance needed for numerous optical applications such as color displays, microscopy and photography. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Graduate Students  Grbic, Anthony  Guo, L. Jay  LNF  Metamaterials  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Gurkan Gok Receives Paper Award for Making Better Antenna Beams

Gurkan Gok (PhD, EE 2014, exp) won Third Place in the Student Paper Competition at the 2014 IEEE Int. Symposium on Antennas and Propagation for his paper that describes an antenna beam former that he developed using metamaterials. The design strategy provides new opportunities in smart antenna development. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Graduate Students  Grbic, Anthony  

Jiangfeng Wu Receives Best Paper Award for Research in Safe Fracking

Jiangfeng Wu, graduate student in electrical engineering, received the Mikio Takagi Student Prize for his research in designing and building an antenna that can better determine the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The Mikio Takagi Student Prize is given to the best of the top three Student Prize Paper Awards granted at the IEEE Int. Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Environment  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Wakefield and Kieras Win Best Paper Award at ICAD 2014

Profs. Gregory Wakefield and David Kieras, along with three coauthors from the Air Force Research Laboratory at the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, received the Best Paper Award at the 20th International Conference on Auditory Display for EPIC Modeling of a Two-Talker CRM Listening Task. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Acoustic Processing  Kieras, David  Lab-Interactive Systems  Lab-Software Systems  Wakefield, Gregory H.  

Thomas Frost Receives Best Paper Award for Achieving a HQ QD Red Laser

Thomas Frost received a Best Paper Award for achieving a high quality quantum dot red laser using novel materials. Lasers emitting in the 600nm wavelength range have important applications in medicine, optical information processing, plastic fiber communication systems, optical storage, and full color laser displays and laser projectors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Graduate Students  LNF  Lasers  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Metal particles in memristors do not stay put

In work that unmasks some of the magic behind memristors and RRAM, cutting-edge computer components that combine logic and memory functions, researchers have shown that the metal particles in memristors don't stay put as previously thought. The findings have broad implications for the semiconductor industry and beyond. They show, for the first time, exactly how some memristors remember. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

New Research Program to Investigate Optical Energy Conversion

ECE is home to a new major research program that aims to provide a better understanding of phenomena driven by the magnetic field component of light. A key long-term goal of this five-year, $7.5M MURI, called the Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics (DYNAMO), is to investigate the prospects for direct conversion of light to electricity without the thermodynamic losses typical of photovoltaic (solar cell) technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

A better light bulb

Already a key lighting material for smart phones, a new approach to building phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) will make them useful even for general lighting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Lighting  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

MEMS Research by Muzhi Wang Recognized at IMS 2014

ECE graduate student Muzhi Wang received a best student paper award, honorable mention, at the 2014 IEEE International Microwave Symposium (IMS2014) for his research in RF MEMS switches for high-power RF applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  MEMS and Microsystems  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  

Designing robots that assemble and adapt

What happens when you send a rolling robot out for a mission, and it turns out to need legs instead? In this video, Shai Revzen, assistant professor of ECE, describes how his team is working to create "self-assembling" robots that can build themselves into any form required. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Revzen, Shai  Robotics  

A new way to make laser-like beams using 250x less power

With precarious particles called polaritons that straddle the worlds of light and matter, ECE researchers have demonstrated a new, practical and potentially more efficient way to make a coherent laser-like beam. They have made what's believed to be the first room-temperature polariton laser that is fueled by electrical current as opposed to light. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  CPHOM  LNF  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Small, Simple Terahertz Detector Converts The Pulses To Sound

"Terahertz waves, which are non-ionizing and can penetrate fabrics and body tissue, could be used to reveal hidden weapons and spot skin cancer and tooth decay. But they are notoriously difficult to detect. Engineers at the University of Michigan have invented a simple new way to sense them." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Terahertz Technology  

T-ray converts light to sound for weapons detection, medical imaging

A research team led by Profs. Jay Guo and Ted Norris created a device that turns terahertz waves (T-rays) into ultrasound, which can then be detected by a highly sensitive acoustic sensor. Applications for T-rays include weapons detection, medical imaging, and astronomy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  CPHOM  Guo, L. Jay  Medical Imaging  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Security (national and personal safety)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Terahertz Technology  

Research in Machine Learning earns Notable Paper Award at AISTATS 2014

Prof. Clay Scott received a Notable Paper Award at the 2014 Int. Conf. on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics for his research in the area of machine learning. The theoretical research has applications in big data problems such as crowd sourcing, topic modeling, and nuclear particle classification. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Machine Learning  Scott, Clayton D.  Signal and Image Processing   

Leaders in Ultra Low Power Circuits and Systems Presenting at VLSI Circuits Symposium

Michigan faculty and students will present seven papers at the 2014 Symposium on VLSI Circuits, a number that exceeds any other academic institution or company. The seven papers range from a millimeter-scale wireless imaging system, to a chip that can decipher an image in a manner similar to the human brain, to continued optimization of the circuits we use every day, as well as circuits that will fuel the future Internet of Things. One of the papers, Low Power Battery Supervisory Circuit with Adaptive Battery Health Monitor, has been selected as a Symposium Technical Highlight. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Flynn, Michael  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Mobile Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Zhang, Zhengya  

Hao Sun Earns 3 Paper Awards for Medical Imaging Research

Hao Sun, a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering:Systems program, will receive 3 paper awards at the 2014 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) meeting. held May 10-16 in Milan, Italy, for his research in the area of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Medical Imaging  Signal and Image Processing   

Show All