ECE Research News

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Jul 23, 2014
Jiangfeng Wu Receives Best Paper Award for Research in Safe Fracking

Jiangfeng Wu, graduate student in electrical engineering, received the Mikio Takagi Student Prize for his research in designing and building an antenna that can better determine the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The Mikio Takagi Student Prize is given to the best of the top three Student Prize Paper Awards granted at the IEEE Int. Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Environment  Graduate Students  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Jul 17, 2014
Wakefield and Kieras Win Best Paper Award at ICAD 2014

Profs. Gregory Wakefield and David Kieras, along with three coauthors from the Air Force Research Laboratory at the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, received the Best Paper Award at the 20th International Conference on Auditory Display for EPIC Modeling of a Two-Talker CRM Listening Task. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Acoustic Processing  Kieras, David  Wakefield, Gregory H.  

Jul 15, 2014
Thomas Frost Receives Best Paper Award for Achieving a HQ QD Red Laser

Thomas Frost received a Best Paper Award for achieving a high quality quantum dot red laser using novel materials. Lasers emitting in the 600nm wavelength range have important applications in medicine, optical information processing, plastic fiber communication systems, optical storage, and full color laser displays and laser projectors. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Graduate Students  LNF  Lasers  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Jun 26, 2014
Metal particles in memristors do not stay put

In work that unmasks some of the magic behind memristors and RRAM, cutting-edge computer components that combine logic and memory functions, researchers have shown that the metal particles in memristors don't stay put as previously thought. The findings have broad implications for the semiconductor industry and beyond. They show, for the first time, exactly how some memristors remember. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Jun 24, 2014
New Research Program to Investigate Optical Energy Conversion

ECE is home to a new major research program that aims to provide a better understanding of phenomena driven by the magnetic field component of light. A key long-term goal of this five-year, $7.5M MURI, called the Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics (DYNAMO), is to investigate the prospects for direct conversion of light to electricity without the thermodynamic losses typical of photovoltaic (solar cell) technology. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Energy  Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

Jun 23, 2014
A better light bulb

Already a key lighting material for smart phones, a new approach to building phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) will make them useful even for general lighting. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Energy  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Lighting  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Jun 18, 2014
MEMS Research by Muzhi Wang Recognized at IMS 2014

ECE graduate student Muzhi Wang received a best student paper award, honorable mention, at the 2014 IEEE International Microwave Symposium (IMS2014) for his research in RF MEMS switches for high-power RF applications. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Graduate Students  MEMS and Microsystems  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  

Jun 17, 2014
Designing robots that assemble and adapt

What happens when you send a rolling robot out for a mission, and it turns out to need legs instead? In this video, Shai Revzen, assistant professor of ECE, describes how his team is working to create "self-assembling" robots that can build themselves into any form required. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Control Systems  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Jun 05, 2014
A new way to make laser-like beams using 250x less power

With precarious particles called polaritons that straddle the worlds of light and matter, ECE researchers have demonstrated a new, practical and potentially more efficient way to make a coherent laser-like beam. They have made what's believed to be the first room-temperature polariton laser that is fueled by electrical current as opposed to light. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  CPHOM  LNF  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

May 22, 2014
Small, Simple Terahertz Detector Converts The Pulses To Sound

"Terahertz waves, which are non-ionizing and can penetrate fabrics and body tissue, could be used to reveal hidden weapons and spot skin cancer and tooth decay. But they are notoriously difficult to detect. Engineers at the University of Michigan have invented a simple new way to sense them." [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  Terahertz Technology  

May 19, 2014
T-ray converts light to sound for weapons detection, medical imaging

A research team led by Profs. Jay Guo and Ted Norris created a device that turns terahertz waves (T-rays) into ultrasound, which can then be detected by a highly sensitive acoustic sensor. Applications for T-rays include weapons detection, medical imaging, and astronomy. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  CPHOM  Guo, L. Jay  Medical Imaging  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Security (national and personal safety)  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  Terahertz Technology  

May 12, 2014
Research in Machine Learning earns Notable Paper Award at AISTATS 2014

Prof. Clay Scott received a Notable Paper Award at the 2014 Int. Conf. on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics for his research in the area of machine learning. The theoretical research has applications in big data problems such as crowd sourcing, topic modeling, and nuclear particle classification. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Big Data  Machine Learning  Scott, Clayton D.  Signal and Image Processing   

May 12, 2014
Leaders in Ultra Low Power Circuits and Systems Presenting at VLSI Circuits Symposium

Michigan faculty and students will present seven papers at the 2014 Symposium on VLSI Circuits, a number that exceeds any other academic institution or company. The seven papers range from a millimeter-scale wireless imaging system, to a chip that can decipher an image in a manner similar to the human brain, to continued optimization of the circuits we use every day, as well as circuits that will fuel the future Internet of Things. One of the papers, Low Power Battery Supervisory Circuit with Adaptive Battery Health Monitor, has been selected as a Symposium Technical Highlight. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Flynn, Michael  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Millimeter-scale Computing  Mobile Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Zhang, Zhengya  

Apr 30, 2014
Hao Sun Earns 3 Paper Awards for Medical Imaging Research

Hao Sun, a graduate student in the Electrical Engineering:Systems program, will receive 3 paper awards at the 2014 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) meeting. held May 10-16 in Milan, Italy, for his research in the area of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Medical Imaging  Signal and Image Processing   

Apr 28, 2014
Powering the Internet of Things (video)

Prof. David Wentzloff describes the future Internet of Things, a world that he and his colleagues in the Michigan Integrated Circuits Laboratory are enabling with their ultra low power circuits and systems. These sensing systems can detect air quality, bodily health, and whether you forgot to turn off your stove and send that information to your phone. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Sensors  Wentzloff, David  

Apr 17, 2014
Halderman and Lafortune Join TerraSwarm Research Center

Two EECS faculty with expertise in Privacy and Security, J. Alex Halderman and Stephane Lafortune, will join the TerraSwarm Research Center in May. TerraSwarm addresses the huge potential, as well as the risks, of pervasive integration of smart, networked sensors and actuators into the connected world. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lafortune, Stephane  Security (Computing)  

Mar 31, 2014
Bringing batteryless sensors to market

PsiKick, an ultra-low-power wireless sensor company co-founded by Prof. David Wentzloff, has completed first-round, funding. The financing, led by New Enterprise Associates, will be used to accelerate PsiKick's growth and product development to meet the increasing demand for energy-efficient system-on-a-chip technology. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Wearable electronics  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

Mar 18, 2014
Thermal Vision: Graphene light detector first to span infrared spectrum

The first room-temperature light detector that can sense the full infrared (IR) spectrum has the potential to put heat vision technology into a contact lens. IR vision allows us to see in the dark, monitor blood flow, identify chemicals in the environment, and even peer under layers of paint. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Graphene  LNF  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Mar 03, 2014
Transparent color solar cells fuse energy, beauty

Colorful, see-through solar cells could one day be used to make stained-glass windows, decorations and even shades that turn the sun's energy into electricity. The technology is being developed by Prof. Jay Guo's group. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Mar 03, 2014
Photon Glue Enables New Quantum State That Could Mean Better Lighting, Solar Cells

Prof. Steve Forrest and colleagues discovered that light can act as a photon glue that binds together the quantum mechanical properties of two vastly different materials used in electronics. The effect could harness the most useful characteristics from each material for hybrid solar cells and high-efficiency lighting, among other applications. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Lighting  Quantum Science and Devices  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Feb 19, 2014
What are quantum computers going to do for us?

Prof. Duncan Steel, a leading expert in quantum computer technology, describes how these computers work, and what their implications are for cyber security. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Quantum Computing  Quantum Science and Devices  Security (Computing)  Steel, Duncan  

Feb 13, 2014
Biochips for better cancer therapy

Prof. Yoon's group is working to dramatically accelerate progress in a form of cancer therapy known as photodynamic therapy (PDT), which combines the agents of a photosensitive drug, light, and oxygen to attack cancerous tumors and lesions locally in the targeted region of the body by selective optical illumination. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Health  Medical diagnosis  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  Yoon, Euisik  

Jan 16, 2014
Zhaoshi Meng Receives Best Paper Award at CAMSAP 2013

Zhaoshi Meng, a doctoral student in the Electrical Engineering:Systems program, received 2nd place in the Student Paper Competition at the 5th IEEE Int. Workshop on Computational Advances in Multi-Sensor Adaptive Processing (CAMSAP 2013). [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  Machine Learning  Networks and Networking  Signal and Image Processing   

Dec 04, 2013
Two-legged robot walks outside at U-Michigan

With prosthetic feet and hips that can swing sideways for stability, the University of Michigan's newest two-legged robot has taken its first steps outside. The machine named MARLO is the third-generation bipedal robot for Prof. Jessy Grizzle. While its predecessors were connected to lateral support booms and confined to the lab, MARLO can venture out into the sunlight. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Nov 26, 2013
MCubed A Year Later: A Record of Fostering Innovative Research

The first annual MCubed Symposium served as a showcase for the 200+ projects that came into being thanks to the MCubed initiative. In ECE, the program enabled research to progress to the point that our faculty are applying for major grants to continue the work, submitting papers to conferences and journals, and founding new companies. [Full Story]

Nov 21, 2013
ECE Research on Display (with event photo gallery)

Research in electrical and computer engineering was on grand display at the 2013 CoE Graduate Symposium. With nearly 100 ECE posters displayed, current and prospective students were able to get a glimpse at the range of research happening in the department, and meet the graduate students making it all happen. [Full Story]

Nov 04, 2013
New algorithms and theory for shining light through non-transparent media

Curtis Jin, a graduate student in electrical engineering, is part of a research team that has developed theory and algorithms that can mitigate or even overcome loss in transmission power due to the multiple scattering of light in non-transparent (ie, scattering) media. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Michielssen, Eric  Nadakuditi, Rajesh Rao  Rand, Stephen  Sensors  Signal and Image Processing   Theory  

Oct 30, 2013
Making the Internet of Things Happen

Prof. David Wentzloff is helping to make a worldwide Internet of Things more than a dream through his research in low-power wireless communication, and more recently, through his new startup company called PsiKick. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Millimeter-scale Computing  Wearable electronics  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

Oct 30, 2013
Kyu Hyun Kim Receives Emil Wolf Outstanding Student Paper Award

Kyu Hyun Kim, Ph.D. candidate in electrical engineering, received an Emil Wolf Outstanding Student Paper Competition award at the 2013 OSA Frontiers in Optics conference for his work in microfluidic optomechanics. Potential applications of this research range from ultrasound mapping of a single living cell to fundamental quantum optomechanical experiments with superfluids. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Microfluidics  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  

Oct 30, 2013
How a metamaterial might improve a depression treatment

A brain stimulation technique that is used to treat tough cases of depression could be considerably improved with a new headpiece designed by University of Michigan engineers. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Brain  Grbic, Anthony  Health  Metamaterials  Michielssen, Eric  

Oct 17, 2013
Better miniaturized vacuum pumps for electronics and sensors

ECE researchers have built three different types of record-breaking micro scale vacuum pumps that could greatly extend the capabilities of electronics and sensing devices that use these devices, such as gas analyzers for homeland security, healthcare, search and rescue, and other applications. They have also taken an important step towards building an integrated, easily manufactured, micro gas chromatography system that incorporates a vacuum micro pump. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Gianchandani, Yogesh  Health  MEMS and Microsystems  Najafi, Khalil  Security (national and personal safety)  Sensors  

Sep 26, 2013
Research that will lead to sharper photos earns best paper award

Research by Dr. Paul Shearer, Prof. Alfred O. Hero, III and Prof. Anna Gilbert, earned Best Paper Award at the 2013 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing. The researchers tackled the problem of "camera shake," which is inevitable in cases where a tripod is either not available or practical for taking pictures. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  Signal and Image Processing   

Aug 15, 2013
Image processing 1,000 times faster is goal of new $5M contract

Loosely inspired by a biological brain's approach to making sense of visual information, Prof. Wei Lu is leading a project to build alternative computer hardware that could process images and video 1,000 times faster with 10,000 times less power than today's systems, all without sacrificing accuracy. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Flynn, Michael  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  LNF  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Sensors  Signal and Image Processing   Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  Zhang, Zhengya  

Aug 13, 2013
Jae Young Park Receives Best Student Paper Award for Research Impacting Structural Health Monitoring

Jae Young Park, a recent doctoral student in the Electrical Engineering:Systems program, received a Best Student Paper Award at the Signal Processing with Adaptive Sparse Structured Representations (SPARS 2013) conference. The method described in the paper is expected to increase the longevity of battery-based sensor devices that record structural information, increase the accuracy of basic data analysis techniques, and decrease the memory requirements of such tasks. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Sensors  Signal and Image Processing   

Aug 07, 2013
Faster, more powerful mobile devices: U-M startup Crossbar could disrupt the memory market

Crossbar, Inc., co-founded in 2010 by Prof. Wei Lu, announced its emergence from stealth mode after its recent development of a working Crossbar memory array at a commercial fab. With its improvements in speed, power consumption, and endurance combined with half the die size, Crossbar is expected to enable a new wave of electronics innovation for consumer, enterprise, mobile, industrial and connected device applications. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Technology Transfer  

Jul 10, 2013
When GPS fails, this speck of an electronic device could step in

In a pellet of glass the size of an apple seed, Electrical and Computer Engineering researchers have packed seven devices that together could potentially provide navigation in the absence of the satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS.) [Full Story]


Related Topics:  GPS  MEMS and Microsystems  Najafi, Khalil  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  

Jun 25, 2013
New laser shows what substances are made of; could be new eyes for military

A new laser that can show what objects are made of could help military aircraft identify hidden dangers such as weapons arsenals far below. "For the defense and intelligence communities, this could add a new set of eyes," said Prof. Mohammed Islam. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Islam, Mohammed  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Security (national and personal safety)  

May 17, 2013
New cyber-physical systems grants to advance health, energy & transportation

NSF announced two projects to expand the frontiers of cyber-physical systems. Prof. Jessy Grizzle will lead the four-year $4M project called, Correct by Design Control Software Synthesis for Highly Dynamic Systems. Prof. Demos Teneketzis will lead U-Ms effort in the UC-Berkeley based project called, Foundations of Resilient Cyber-Physical Systems (FORCES). [NSF press release] [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Communications  Control Systems  Cyber-physical systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Hiskens, Ian  Teneketzis, Demosthenis  Theory  

May 15, 2013
A new laser paradigm: An electrically injected polariton laser

Prof. Pallab Bhattacharya and his group have demonstrated a paradigm-shifting polariton laser that's fueled not by light, but by electricity. Prof. Bhattacharya calls the device, which was first suggested in 1996, truly transformative. The device requires at least 1,000 times less energy to operate than a conventional laser. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  CPHOM  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Apr 29, 2013
Research in distributed networks earns Notable Paper Award at AISTATS

The research by Prof. Al Hero, ECE graduate student Zhaoshi Meng, and Dr. Dennis Wei provides a way to efficiently reveal relationships between even distant entities in a network, whether it be a social network or a network of sensors. The group will present their research at the 16th Int. Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  Machine Learning  Networks and Networking  Signal and Image Processing   

Apr 12, 2013
A better single-photon emitter for quantum cryptography

A silicon-based single-photon emitter developed by Prof. Pallab Bhattacharya and his group is simpler and more efficient than those currently available, and can be made using traditional semiconductor processing techniques. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  LNF  Optics and Photonics  Quantum Science and Devices  Security (Computing)  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Apr 05, 2013
Better than X-rays: A more powerful terahertz imaging system

Prof. Mona Jarrahi and her group developed a laser-powered terahertz source that will allow for deeper imaging of tissue, and the sensing of smaller quantities of drugs and explosives from farther distances than is currently possible. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Health  Jarrahi, Mona  Medical Imaging  Sensors  Terahertz Technology  

Mar 28, 2013
Researchers Funded to Develop a Leap Forward in Processor Architectures

A team of researchers led by Trevor Mudge, Bredt Family Professor of Engineering and Director of the ARM Research Center at Michigan, has been funded for research and development of hardware and software techniques that directly support and make practical a new generation of energy efficient, high performance multi-layer processor systems for use in embedded computing systems. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Embedded Computing and Systems  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Mahlke, Scott  Mudge, Trevor  Near-threshold computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Zhang, Zhengya  

Mar 25, 2013
NAE Awards Mona Jarrahi a Grainger Foundation Frontiers of Engineering Grant

Prof. Mona Jarrahi, together with Prof. Jordan Green, an assistant professor of Biomedical Engineering at The Whitaker Institute at Johns Hopkins, have received a Grainger Foundation Frontiers of Engineering Grant by the National Academy of Engineering to explore genetic therapy methods to treat diseases. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Genetics  Health  Jarrahi, Mona  Terahertz Technology  

Mar 25, 2013
After Newtown: A new use for a weapons-detecting radar?

In the aftermath of the Newtown school shooting, Prof. Kamal Sarabandi envisions a new use for a weapons-detecting radar system he's been developing for the past few years. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  Security (national and personal safety)  Weapons detection  

Mar 20, 2013
U-M partners with Israeli university on renewable energy

The University of Michigan and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel will forge a research partnership to collaborate on developing renewable technologies. The partnership grew out of U-M's VP for Research Stephen Forrest's visits to Israel over the past five years, and will focus on the areas of advanced vehicle fuels, solar energy, and thermoelectric materials, which convert heat to electricity. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Alternative Energy  Energy  Forrest, Stephen  International Partnerships  

Feb 26, 2013
Scientific Milestone: A room temperature Bose-Einstein condensate

Prof. Pallab Bhattacharya and a team of researchers have created and directly observed what they believe to be a near-equilibrium room temperature Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). A BEC is an unusual state of matter in which a group of boson particles can exist in a single quantum state, giving scientists the rare opportunity to directly observe novel quantum phenomena. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  CPHOM  LNF  Optics and Photonics  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Feb 22, 2013
Cockroaches and robots: Reverse engineering the balance systems of animals

Running cockroaches start to recover from being shoved sideways before their dawdling nervous system kicks in to tell their legs what to do. This new insight by Prof. Shai Revzen and colleagues into how biological systems stabilize could one day help engineers design steadier robots and improve doctors understanding of human gait abnormalities. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Biomimicry  Health  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Computer Vision  Security (national and personal safety)  

Feb 14, 2013
Translating animal movement into better robotic design

Prof. Shai Revzen pioneered a method, called Data Driven Floquet Analysis (DDFA), which he is currently using to test scientific theories of neuromechanical control in animals and humans, and extract principles that may guide future robotic design. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Biomimicry  Health  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Feb 07, 2013
Next-gen e-readers: Improved peacock technology could lock in color for high-res displays

Prof. Jay Guo and his group have found a way to lock in so-called structural color, which is made with texture rather than chemicals. This could lead to advanced color e-books and electronic paper, as well as other color reflective screens that don't need their own light to be readable. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Biomimicry  Displays  Electronic devices  Guo, L. Jay  LNF  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

 



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