Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE News

Having Fun with ECE

Students, alumni, faculty, and friends came together for games and exciting displays at this year's Family Fun Night. Attendees of all ages brought the EECS atrium to life in an evening of science, robots, and more. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  

A temporary tattoo that brings hospital care to the home

What if doctors could monitor patients at home with the same degree of accuracy they'd get during a stay at the hospital? Bioelectronics innovator and alum Todd Coleman (BSE EE ) shares his quest to develop wearable, flexible electronic health monitoring patches that promise to revolutionize healthcare and make medicine less invasive. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Health  

Experts: State Should Audit Election Results

Since hackers have targeted the election systems of more than 20 states, cyber-security experts including Prof. J. Alex Halderman say Michigan should change its policy and routinely audit a sample of its paper ballots to protect against election fraud. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Parag Deotare Receives AFOSR Award for Research in Nanoscale Exciton-Mechanical Systems (NEXMS)

Prof. Parag Deotare received a Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) to support basic scientific research in Nanoscale Exciton-Mechanical Systems (NEXMS). In this project, Prof. Deotare will investigate the interactions between exciton and mechanics, which will lead to a better understanding of exciton dynamics. This work will deepen our understanding of the underlying physics of exciton-mechanics interactions and help engineer novel devices for energy harvesting and up-conversion. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy  Energy Scavenging  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Optics and Photonics  Power & Energy  

What Surveillance Will Look Like in the Future: Even Bugs Will Be Bugged

Prof. David Blaauw gets a mention in the Atlantic for building the world's smallest computers, which can be equipped with cameras and other sensors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  

Asked and Answered Jessy Grizzle Takes on Reddit

Prof. Jessy Grizzle, newly named Director of Michigan Robotics, took to Reddit to answer the internet's burning questions about bipedal robots. The first in the department to tackle the medium, he spent a day fielding open questions from the public as part of an Ask Me Anything on the science subreddit. Questions ranged from deep algorithm inquiries to complaints about tough EECS courses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

A Silver-Medal Finish for ECE Olympic Rower

Electrical Engineering sophomore and Ann Arbor native Zach Burns brought home a silver medal from the Rio De Janeiro Summer Olympics in September as part of the US Paralympic Rowing Team. This was Zachs third year with the team, finally getting to take on the Olympic games after two years traveling to the World Championships. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Profile  Undergraduate Students  

Solving the "Christmas light" problem so solar panels can handle shade

Just 10 percent shade cover can create a 50 percent drop in solar panel electricity production. Prof. Al-Thaddeus Avestrus is working to ensure power produced by a solar panel reflects the average over all the cells. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Avestruz, Al-Thaddeus  Power & Energy  Solar Cell Technology  Sustainability  

COVE: A Tool for Advancing Progress in Computer Vision

A new project has been launched to provide open and easy access to up-to-date, varied, data sets, annotations and their relevant tools. Based at the University of Michigan with collaborators at Boston University and the University of Notre Dame, the program aims to centralize available data in the intelligent systems community through a COmputer Vision Exchange for Data, Annotations and Tools, called COVE. The project promises to have an immediate and far-reaching impact on the computer vision community as well as researchers involved in machine learning, multimedia, natural language processing, data mining, and information retrieval. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  Signal and Image Processing   

U-M Shannon Centennial Symposium Celebrates the Father of Information Theory

Researchers from around the nation gathered at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor to celebrate the 100th birthday of alumnus Claude E. Shannon (BSE EE/Eng Math , ScD hon. ) at the Shannon Centennial Symposium on September 16, 2016, co-organized by Al Hero, Hye Won Chung, Dave Neuhoff, and Sandeep Pradhan. All four plenary talks are available online. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Systems  Neuhoff, David L.  Pradhan, S. Sandeep  

Cancer stem cells: new method analyzes 10,000 cells at once

A new device for studying tumor cells can trap 10,000 individual cells in a single chip. The technique, developed by Prof. Euisik Yoon's group, could one day help screen potential cancer treatments based on an individual patients tumor and help researchers better understand so-called cancer stem cells. It also shed light on a controversy: are large cells or small cells more likely to be cancer stem cells? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cancer  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Yoon, Euisik  

David Blaauw Honored with SIA/SRC University Research Award

Prof. David Blaauw was presented with the University Research Award by the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA), in consultation with Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC), in recognition of his outstanding contributions to semiconductor research in the area of design research. He was presented with the award by the SIA Board on September 21, 2016 in San Jose, CA. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Cindy Finelli Invited to NAE Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium

Cindy Finelli was among 48 faculty members across the country invited to attend the 2016 National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium. She will present her project about A more student-centered electrical engineering classroom through pre-class reading and in-class problem solving, which integrates elements of a flipped classroom. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education  Finelli, Cynthia  

Meet the New Director of Michigan Robotics

Jessy Grizzle, the Elmer G. Gilbert Distinguished University Professor and Jerry W. and Carol L. Levin Professor of Engineering, has been written about in Wired, his work featured on CNN and The Discovery Channel, and his robot videos viewed around the world even in Michigan Stadium during the football games. He's now the new director of Michigan Robotics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  Robotics  

A New Era of Robotics at Michigan

A newly approved robotics center promises to consolidate and expand existing robotics research at U-M. With Jessy Grizzle as Director, everyone is excited at the promise the new space offers for increased collaboration and synergy of effort. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

EECS Students Row Blue! to Victory

The Michigan Mens Rowing team won their 9th consecutive national championship in Gainesville, Georgia, with four EECS students rowing in their toughest category. Their succesful season qualified the team to compete abroad in the Henley Royal Regatta, the most prestigious boat race series in the world, which takes place annually on the River Thames in England. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Mark Kushner Receives Plasma Chemistry Award for Lifetime of Achievement

Mark Kushner, George I. Haddad Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has been awarded the 2017 Plasma Chemistry Award (PCA) from the International Plasma Chemistry Society (IPCS). The Plasma Chemistry Award is the highest recognition awarded by the IPCS and recognizes a lifetime of achievements in the field of the Plasma Chemistry. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  Plasma Science and Engineering   

ECE Welcomes New Faculty

ECE is delighted to welcome these outstanding new faculty members to Michigan. These faculty broaden and deepen ECE's areas of expertise in robotics, ultra low power circuits, nanophotonics, information theory, and many other areas. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Afshari, Ehsan  Berenson, Dmitry  Kim, Hun-Seok  Kira, Mackillo  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lab-Systems  Mahdavifar, Hessam  Mi, Zetian  Pilanci, Mert  

U-M, Yottabyte partner to accelerate data-intensive research

A strategic partnership between the University of Michigan and software company Yottabyte promises to unleash a new wave of data-intensive research by providing a flexible computing cloud for complex computational analyses of sensitive and restricted data. Prof. Eric Michielssen says it will “improve research productivity by reducing the cost and time required to create the individualized, secure computing platforms that are increasingly necessary to support scientific discovery in the age of Big Data.” [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Michielssen, Eric  

Hacking Healthcare - How Big Data is Driving Big Changes in Medicine

The article by CoE writer Gabe Cherry highlights the work being done by Jenna Wiens and her collaborators on using big data to predict which hospital patients are at risk of developing a life-threatening intestinal infection called Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. It also provides context on the big data initiatives taking at UM in general and with respect to healthcare, and across EECS, including work by Prof. Barzan Mozafari on how to improve the design of big data databases. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Big Data  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Michielssen, Eric  Mower Provost, Emily  Mozafari, Barzan  Wiens, Jenna  

Jasprit Singh: Seeking a Better Life Through Engineering - Even in Retirement

Prof. Jasprit Singh has retired after 30 years at the University of Michigan to embark on his second career as president and co-founder of Gurmentor, Inc., a software application company. During his time at Michigan, he experienced the thrill of scientific discovery, enlightening students into the physics and mysteries of electrical engineering, and sharing his belief that technology can enhance healthy and peaceful living. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Singh, Jasprit  

Real holograms are on bank cards, not starships

Holograms are more than science fiction, but the real-life technology isnt what people think it is. Most of the technologies calling themselves holographic do not produce actual holograms including the specters of Vargas Llosa, Kimmel, Modi, Tupac, and MJ, which are created via computer-generated images and high-definition video projection. A real hologram is an image that records the diffraction of laser light directed at an object, and was invented in part by EECS professor Emmett Leith in the 1960s. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Holography  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers  

Necmiye Ozay Receives NASA Early Career Faculty Award for Research in Cyber-Physical Systems

Prof. Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was awarded a NASA Early Career Faculty award for her project, "Run-time anomaly detection and mitigation in information-rich cyber-physical systems." Her research will be designed to assist in future missions in space, while being applicable to a wide range of cyber-physical systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Cyber-physical systems  Lab-Systems  Ozay, Necmiye  Space technology  

Celebrating a Leader in Control Systems

Friends and former students of Prof. Demos Teneketzis celebrated his 65th birthday with a Workshop on Information, Decisions, and Networks in his honor. Throughout the two-day event, this group of accomplished researchers presented on their work spanning the different fields of control theory. Speakers, students and friends came from around the world and represented all corners of industry and academia. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Control Systems  Lab-Systems  Lafortune, Stephane  Teneketzis, Demosthenis  

Students Seek the Secrets of the Brain in Study Abroad Program

Eight undergrad students got the chance to work on cutting edge brain research in Germany this summer through the International Program for the Advancement of Neurotechnology (IPAN). Directed by Prof. Euisik Yoon, the program sent students from around the country to two universities where they experienced a month of in-depth lab work on devices that could help us better understand the brain. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  Health  International Prog. for the Adv. of Neurotechnology  Undergraduate Students  Yoon, Euisik  

Solar power plant: $1.4M grant aims to cut costs

Nanotechnology could reduce the cost of the most expensive part of a solar thermal power plant by roughly 75 percent. The Department of Energy gave a team of researchers at the University of Illinois, the University of Michigan and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory $1.4 million to develop new solar concentrators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Power & Energy  Solar Cell Technology  

Screen Savers: The World's Smallest Computer

The new episode of Screen Savers features Prof. David Blaauw, whose team has developed the world's smallest computer. The Michigan Micro Mote (M3) works as a fully functioning computer on the millimeter scale. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

Michigan Solar Car defends national title in sweeping victory

Despite nearly-sunless conditions in the final two days, the University of Michigan Solar Car team has successfully defended their decade-long reigning championship winning the 2016 American Solar Challenge for the sixth consecutive time. After two sunless final days of the race, U-M's car, Aurum, ended up the only entree to finish on 100% solar power. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Solar Cell Technology  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Hands-On Robotics: A Course for Anyone Interested in Robots and Autonomy

Check out this new video about the course Hands on Robotics. It not only provides an introduction to the broadly interdisciplinary field of robotics, it encourages students to solve an open-ended problem. Students build different types of robots throughout the semester using the CKBot modular robot system. The course covers concepts from kinematics, to control, to programming. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Course  Revzen, Shai  Robotics  

The Adventures of a Blissfully Unaware Bipedal Robot at the Grassy Wave Field

Evan Ackerman writes: "Grizzle says that when it comes to MARLO trying to conquer the 'devious undulations' of the Wave Field, 'we have gotten farther than I thought we would, to be honest.' This is the sort of thing we like to hear from researchers and dont, usually: pleasant surprise about how well their robot is performing. For more details on how MARLO managed to get this far, we asked him a few specific questions." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

Tiny Computer Has Enormous Potential

"The Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif., has a new addition - one that is at the cutting edge of new computer technology. It isnt a breakthrough new powerhouse in computing, but instead a computer so small that one of the devices can sit on the edge of a coin." It's the Michigan Micro Mote! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  

UM::Autonomy Makes a Strong Finish at RobotBoat Competition

The UM::Autonomy team took 6th place in the world at this years RoboNation RoboBoat Competition, where teams build autonomous, robotic boats to navigate and race through an aquatic obstacle course. The boat is completely designed and programmed by the students each year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Pioneering Engineering Education Research

A new initiative at the College of Engineering has brought U-M into the spotlight in the field of Engineering Education Research (EER). Spearheaded by Prof. David C. Munson, Jr. while he was Dean, the College took a unique approach to EER by embedding faculty directly into traditional engineering departments. A few other institutions had already developed standalone departments or schools for EER with their own sets of faculty and PhD students, but U-Ms approach is the first of its kind. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Education  Finelli, Cynthia  

Baja Wins Big

The U-M Baja Racing Team made huge waves this season. Along with their second consecutive overall 1st place finish, they also received the seasons highest honor, the Mike Schmidt Memorial Award. This award is given to the team with the highest cumulative points between three competitions. As if that wasnt enough, at the California race the team broke the record for the most points ever earned at a Baja SAE event, scoring 1007/1000. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Students from the United States visiting various work groups of BrainLinks-BrainTools this summer

Four undergrad students participating in the International Program for the Advancement of Neurotechnology (IPAN)'s summer bootcamp visited the cluster of excellence at Freiburg University in Germany. The students received training in modern neuroscience research and tools. IPAN and the study abroad program are directed by Prof. Euisik Yoon. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  International Prog. for the Adv. of Neurotechnology  Undergraduate Students  Yoon, Euisik  

ECE Alumnus Leverages Big Data to Influence Corporate Strategy

Rodger Howell (BSE EE 1990) says data analytics and machine learning can be key to boosting revenues and streamlining financial reporting in this guest column. While many CFOs recognize the value of big data and its insights, some are overwhelmed by the volume of information available and have yet to fully leverage it. Rodger helps companies align costs to their business strategy as an Advisory principal for PwCs Strategy, [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Big Data  

National Robotics Initiative: Celebrating Five Years, Looking Ahead

Move over, C-3PO and R2-D2! You may have been robot celebrities during the glory years of Star Wars, but next-generation robotics are the new, 21st century superstars. A recent event on Capitol Hill celebrated the five-year anniversary of the National Robotics Initiative. It also provided an opportunity for NRI-funded research groups to both display their accomplishments, and also encourage Congress to maintain this critical funding mechanism for robotics in the United States. Prof. Jessy Grizzle attended with a display on his work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  Robotics  

EECS Research Highlighted at 2016 Robotics: Science and Systems Conference

The University of Michigan was host to the 2016 Robotics: Science and Systems Conference, which took place June 18-22. The conference, which was co-chaired by Prof. Edwin Olson and Prof. Ryan Eustice, brought together researchers working on algorithmic or mathematical foundations of robotics, robotics applications, and analysis of robotic systems. The event gave attendees the opportunity to see the best research in all areas of robotics, as well as, attend invited talks, oral and interactive presentations of refereed papers, workshops, tutorials, and lab presentations. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Jenkins, Chad  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Systems  Olson, Edwin  Revzen, Shai  Robotics  

R&D's Scientist of the Year - Starting 50 Years Ago with the Pioneer

50 years ago R&D Magazine chose its very first recipient of the prestigious Scientist of the Year Award Emmett Leith. The professor of electrical engineering at the University of Michigan was presented with the honor for co-inventing the three-dimensional holography, better known as the technology of laser to help create 3D photography. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Holography  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

ECE Alumnus Franklin Dollar 2016 Sloan Research Fellow and Most Promising Scientist

Franklin Dollar (MSE EE 2010, PhD Applied Physics 2012), Assistant Professor of Physics & Astronomy at UC-Irvine, was named a Sloan Research Fellow and Most Promising Scientist in 2016 by the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. Prof. Dollar directs the Dollar Lab of Ultrafast High Intensity Plasma Physics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

MARLO makes initial attempt at the Wave Field

Since he received a robot capable of walking outside, Jessy Grizzle has heard the siren call of the Wave Field, the undulating earthen art installation outside the Franois-Xavier Bagnoud building. MARLO finally got her shot at it. For now, Jessy and his graduate students are only attempting the easiest routes, between the grassy two- to three-foot moguls, over smaller undulations that Grizzle calls merely very difficult. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

Stephane Lafortune Named Fellow of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC)

Stephane Lafortune has been named Fellow of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC), "For contributions to control and diagnosis of discrete event systems." Prof. Lafortune has been a leading researcher in the field of discrete event systems (DES) for the last 25 years. His fundamental work covers the gamut from modeling, analysis, diagnosis, control, and optimization. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Lab-Software Systems  Lafortune, Stephane  

ECE alumnus is making unmanned flight safe

Raja Sengupta (MSE PhD EE:S 91, 95), a professor of civil and environmental engineering at UC Berkeley and co-founder of the startup company Responsible Robotics, heads a team spun out of the Cal Unmanned Aviation Lab that is creating new technologies that enable drone operators to easily comply with emerging regulations. To foster the safe development of a new industry, drone manufacturers, enthusiasts and regulators are trying to strike the right balance between access and accountability. Responsible Robotics has launched several products to meet that need. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Autonomous Vehicles   

A Women's History of Silicon Valley

Too often, in Silicon Valley as in other places, women are involved in significant events, but their stories go untold. They are the cofounders who are not named in press articles. Check out this list of seven women who were key figures in the technologies that made Silicon Valley what it is today. Included on the list is Professor Emeritus Lynn Conway, who helped make large-scale chip production and innovation possible with her pivotal work on VLSI. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  Women in Computing  

Google snaps up startup in push to master computer vision

The future of computer vision looks bright following a string of tech acquisitions in the field, most recently by Google. Jason Corso offers his perspective on the future of computer vision and the challenges researchers have yet to overcome. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  

Dean Munson honored with ASEE Benjamin Garver Lamme Award

In his last week as the Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering, David Munson was honored with the Benjamin Garver Lamme Award from the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). This award is bestowed upon a distinguished engineering educator for contributions to the art of teaching, contributions to research and technical literature, and achievements that contribute to the advancement of the profession of engineering college administration. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Munson Jr., David C.  

A Bipedal Robot Gets Its Swagger On

Popular Science watches MARLO take a stroll across the wave field for the first time. "She's trained her whole life for this moment: MARLO recently stomped and stumbled her way through a new milestone at University of Michigan's Wave Field. The field an art installation turned robot testing ground offers new challenges for the bipedal robot's lateral and forward balance, because of its uneven terrain." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

MARLO the bipedal robot seems to be tipsy

MARLO has captured worldwide attention again with her exploration of the wave field on North Campus. As she tries to navigate the steep bumps with no sensors, just extraordinarily clever algorithms that have her adapting to what she "steps in," she appears to be, well, a bit drunk. This drunken behavior is just MARLO pushing the extremes of what a human-sized bipedal robot can do. See her on Gizmodo, Aol.On and MSN Video
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

Tesla crash raises concerns about autonomous vehicle regulation

The fatal crash of a Tesla Motors Inc Model S in Autopilot mode has turned up pressure on auto industry executives and regulators to ensure that automated driving technology is deployed safely. Jason Corso says the product is meant to be a beta test, and that the crash is a wake-up call to a need for significant further study. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  

Why experts worry about the Tesla crash

Jason Corso told the Detroit Free Press that Tesla's recent autopilot crash is "not a major setback, but an indication of the work still to do." The crash, which resulted in one fatality, occured when neither the automated system nor the driver recognized the white side of the semi-truck against a brightly lit sky. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  

All ECE News for 2016