Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE News

Next generation laser plasma accelerator

Michigan is part of a multi-institution collaboration to develop key laser technology that will enable the design a high-power, ultra-short-pulse laser system which is expected to enable new low-cost, compact accelerator-based light sources for a wide variety of biological, chemical, materials science, and security applications. The technology may also lead to compact, portable TeV (tera electron volt) linear colliders, and enable the same kind of research now being conducted in conventional accelerators, such as the 17 mile Large Hadron Collider, on a table top. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Center for Ultrafast Optical Science (CUOS)  Galvanauskas, Almantas  HERCULES  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  

The Economics of Energy Hamidreza Tavafoghi Earns a Dow Sustainability Fellowship

Hamidreza Tavafoghi, a doctoral student in electrical and computer engineering, has been awarded a Dow Sustainability Fellowship to support his research in energy economics. Hamid is studying ways to increase the use of renewable energy sources on the grid. Adapting the nation's grid to include renewable power, energy storage, and other technologies essential for sustainable energy sources requires a shift in how this enormous market operates to ensure an efficient and stable transition. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Power & Energy  Sustainability  Teneketzis, Demosthenis  

Stryd, co-founded by Prof. Robert Dick, Selected as Part of the 2015 Techstars Class

Stryd, co-founded by Prof. Robert Dick, has been chosen as one of ten companies in the 2015 Techstars class in Boulder, CO. Techstars provides mentorship and seed funding to select companies in different locations nationwide. Stryd applies the concept of power output to a wearable device for runners to help them improve their performance, [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dick, Robert  Entrepreneurship  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Technology Transfer  Wearable electronics  

Researching the Future of Remote Sensing

ECE researchers will explore the fundamental capabilities of remote sensing through a new grant funded by NASA. Directed by Kamal Sarabandi, Rufus S. Teesdale Professor of Engineering, the new program aims to create theoretical models for remote sensing of ice and snow. Specifically, the research seeks to develop a better understanding of wave propagation and scattering, and to improve tools for future monitoring. This work could feed into the development of new sensors for a variety of remote sensing applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Environment  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Stephanie Crocker Earns NSF Fellowship to Bring Sustainable Energy to the Grid

Stephanie Crocker, a PhD student in Electrical and Computer Engineering, has been awarded an NSF Fellowship to support her work on integrating renewable energy sources into the power grid. Working with Prof. Johanna Mathieu, Stephanie seeks to provide continuous energy balancing on the grid by automatically controlling loads. This must be done without disrupting customers and without compromising the grid's physical integrity. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alternative Energy  Control Systems  Energy  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Mathieu, Johanna  

Steven Parkison Earns NSF Fellowship to Design Tools for the Future of Autonomous Cars

Steven Parkison, Ph.D. student in Electrical and Computer Engineering, has received an NSF Fellowship to support his research on machine learning for autonomous vehicles. He is working with Prof. Ryan Eustice as part of the Next Generation Vehicle (NGV) project, a partnership between Ford Motor Company and researchers at the University of Michigan and State Farm Insurance to develop the autonomous vehicles of the future. Michigans principal investigators, Profs. Eustice and Edwin Olson, are taking a leading role on sensing and decision-making. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Autonomous Vehicles   Graduate Students  Olson, Edwin  

New Michigan-Saudi Arabia Collaboration Promises Exciting New Research - Beginning with the Auto Industry

A new collaborative research center, called the Center of Excellence for Microwave Sensor Technology, has been established between ECE faculty and Saudi Arabias King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). The Center will be a major site for research in microwave sensor technology, with the first projects focusing on autonomous vehicles and novel approaches to electric vehicle charging. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Automotive industry  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Massive Clinton-era Internet bug shows pitfalls of Obama's 'backdoor' proposal

In this CNN Money article, Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted regarding the FBI's request for security backdoors in technology products. "It's a bad idea," he says. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

ECE Alumna Ruba Borno to Join New Executive Team at Cisco

Dr. Ruba Borno (MS PHD EE 03 08) has been selected as Cisco's new Vice President of Growth Initiatives and Chief of Staff to the CEO-designate, Chuck Robbins. The young executive has an extensive history in both the business and tech worlds, and promises to be a powerful asset to the company's new executive leadership team. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  WIMS/WIMS2  

Alyssa Kody Earns NSF Fellowship for Research in Energy Harvesting and Wireless Sensing

Alyssa Kody, a Ph.D. student in Electrical and Computer Engineering, has been awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to pursue research in powering wireless embedded systems. The goal of Alyssa's project is to improve energy harvesting technology and decrease network power consumption by implementing whats called energy forecasting. This would enable sensor nodes to predict energy availability in the future and make decisions based on this knowledge. In other words, she would give energy-aware decision making capabilities to a system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  

Stephen Forrest Named Peter A. Franken Distinguished University Professor

Stephen Forrest has been named the Peter A. Franken Distinguished University Professor of Engineering. Prof. Forrest is an internationally-renowned researcher, educator, and entrepreneur - and easily one of the most prolific inventors in academia today. As director of the Optoelectronic Components and Materials (OCM) Laboratory, he and his group conduct research on photovoltaic cells, organic light emitting diodes, and lasers & optics. His investigations in these areas span decades, and have resulted in five startup companies, 277 issued patents, and key technologies that are pervasive in the marketplace. In addition, he has graduated 54 Ph.D. students. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  

Mud-Fueled Smart Sensors for the Bottom of the Ocean

If you put tiny electrodes in the mud on the ocean floor, you can harvest enough energy to power a tiny sensor platform that can monitor whats going on at those depths. The sensing platform draws just 2 nanowatts, and is part of a broader portfolio of work focused on powering electronic systems with low energy sources. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  

ECE Alumni Connections @ IMS2015

The IEEE International Microwave Symposium (IMS) set the stage for ECE's most recent alumni networking event, held in Phoenix on May 19, 2015. It's been more than ten years since ECE brought the Michigan flag to IMS, and it was great to be back! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Silicon Valley Entrepreneurs Help Bring WIMS2 Technology to the World

As Corporate Outreach Directors for the WIMS2 Center, entrepreneurs and U-M alums Sassan Teymouri and Shahin Hedayat are helping to introduce its wireless integrated microsensing and systems technology to Silicon Valley and strengthen the Center's ties to industry. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship  Gianchandani, Yogesh  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  WIMS/WIMS2  

The Mad Scientists Lab: A Look Inside Mitch Rohde and Quantum Signals School-Sized Playhouse

Quantum Signal, co-founded by Prof. Bill Williams and alumnus Mitch Rohde, is a signal processing consulting company specializing in intelligent sensing, data analysis, and visualization. From robotics to gaming and everything in between, Quantum Signal applies signal processing to today's hottest areas. Some of its products include autonomous vehicles, video games, facial recognition devices, and even a system to detect counterfeit bills. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Technology Transfer  

The Gift of an Education: Paul and Ruth Bauhahn Fund the Next Generation of Life-changing Technology

Alumni Paul and Ruth Bauhahn have made a planned gift of $450,000 to establish the Ruth E. and Paul E. Bauhahn Fellowship Fund. The fund will support full-time grad students in ECE. Pauls work covered the frequencies from DC to daylight. It included developing microwave, millimeter wave and micromechanical devices, and working with lasers for diverse applications. He retired from Honeywell with thirteen patents. Ruth retired from Medtronic as a human factor scientist in product development with five patents related to the design of medical devices for spinal cord stimulation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Graduate Students  

2015 Faculty Promotions

Congratulations to the following faculty who received promotions this year: Prabal Dutta, J. Alex Halderman, Rada Mihalcea, Sandeep Pradhan, and Zhengya Zhang. Keep up the great work! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Mihalcea, Rada  Pradhan, S. Sandeep  Zhang, Zhengya  

We Are Now One ECE: The Merged Graduate Program in Electrical and Computer Engineering

In recognition of how the Electrical Engineering discipline has evolved, and to better reflect Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of Michigan, the two graduate programs: Electrical Engineering (EE) and Electrical Engineering:Systems (EE:S) have merged to form one graduate program: Electrical and Computer Engineering. Students will apply to the new program beginning Fall 2015. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

What makes cancer cells spread? New device offers clues

Why do some cancer cells break away from a tumor and travel to distant parts of the body? A team of oncologists and engineers from the University of Michigan teamed up to help understand this crucial question. Prof. Euisik Yoon led the engineering team that created a new device that is able to sort cells based on their ability to move. Cancer becomes deadly when it spreads, or metastasizes. Not all cells have the same ability to travel through the body, but researchers dont understand why. This study is a step towards coming to that understanding. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Yoon, Euisik  

Iverson Bell - Researching the Future of Space Satellites

Iverson Bell is about to graduate with his PhD in electrical engineering. As a member of Prof. Brian Gilchrist's research group, Mr. Bell is investigating the potential of electrodynamic tether propulsion technology to enhance the capabilities of an emerging class of smartphone-sized satellites. Potential applications for these satellites include emergency preparedness, emergency relief, and space weather. In this video, he discusses grad life at Michigan and his ambitions in his field. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Gilchrist, Brian E.  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Space technology  

Medical Education meets Google Glass

Google Glass is being adopted in anatomy labs at U-M as an avenue for hands-free and immediate access to information. The inventor of Glass, ECE alumnus Babak Parviz (MSE PhD EE; MSE Physics), anticipated these types of applications and has described how the Glass technology is changing what it means to know something when answers can be nearly instantaneous. Also mentioned in the article about Glass and medical education are alumni Larry Page (BSE CE), Founder of Google, and Tony Fadell (BSE CE), who is currently leading the team exploring the future of Google Glass. [Read more about Dr. Parviz and the development of Google Glass] [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

CE Alum Jon Fraleigh Named New Vorstack Executive

Jon Fraleigh (BSE CE '82) has been named senior VP of worldwide sales at Vorstack, a leading Threat Intelligence Platform provider for automation, curation, and sharing of threat intelligence to fight cyber threats. He was most recently senior VP of worldwide sales at Q1 Labs/IBM Security Systems Division, where he grew revenue from $10 million to $200 million over six years, and expanded sales into more than 90 countries. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Space Tethers Can Be Used to Fling Spacecraft Into Interplanetary Space

Brian Gilchrist is collaborating with NASA researchers and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory to develop space tethers - a means to "fling" spacecraft further into interplanetary space. Electromagnetic tethers on already-orbiting or space bound satellites could be used to move a spacecraft in space without any propellant whatsoever. The tether could be used to deorbit out-of-use spacecraft, push spacecraft from low Earth orbit into higher orbits, or even push spacecraft out of Earth's orbit altogether. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Gilchrist, Brian E.  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Designing Machines - Can we create machines who learn like we do?

Technology certainly seems smart now - phones listen and talk, computers interpret images and video - but in spite of that, the field of artificial intelligence might best be described as a hot mess: an assortment of intriguing pieces that have yet to be integrated into a truly intelligent system. This article in looks at some of those pieces and how they might fit together. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Laird, John  Lee, Honglak  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Eric M. Aupperle (1935 - 2015): An Internet Pioneer Leaves a Remarkable Legacy

Eric Max Aupperle (BSE EE and Math '57; MSE NERS '58; Instm.E. '64), renowned president of Merit Network and Research Scientist Emeritus, passed away Thursday, April 30, 2015, at the age of 80. As director and president of the computer research network called Merit, Eric Aupperle had a strong influence on the current form of the Internet. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

EECS Graduate Student Instructors Earn Awards for Teaching Excellence

The EECS Department held its annual Graduate Student Instructor (GSI) / Instructional Aide (IA) Awards Ceremony on April 30 to honor top student instructors and aides for their remarkable service and excellence in teaching. ECE and CSE Associate Chairs Dave Neuhoff and Scott Mahlke hosted the event and introduced the awardees. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Mahlke, Scott  Neuhoff, David L.  

Prize Winning Class Team Project for Improved Image Processing

An interdisciplinary team of three graduate students earned prizes in the graduate level course, EECS 556: Image Processing, thanks to the sponsorship of Apple. The course, taught by Prof. Jeff Fessler, covers the theory and application of digital image processing, which has applications in biomedical images, time-varying imagery, robotics, and optics. [Full Story]

At 50 Years Old, The Challenge To Keep Up With Moores Law

NPRs All Tech Considered: Fifty years ago this week, a chemist in what is now Silicon Valley published a paper that set the groundwork for the digital revolution. That man was Gordon Moore. Moores Law is all about electronic miniaturization, and the article talks about the worlds smallest computer, the Michigan Micro Mote, currently on display at the Computer History Museum. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

Eta Kappa Nu Awards Professors of the Year at St. Georges Day Feast

In an afternoon of food and fun, the annual department St. George's Day Feast provided a welcome break for students in their last week of class. As part of the event, two professors were chosen as 2014-2015 HKN Professors of the year by U-M Eta Kappa Nu, the local chapter of the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. Prof. David Wentzloff, Associate Professor in ECE, and David Paoletti, lecturer in CSE, were chosen based on student input. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Thomas Chen Earns NSF Fellowship for Research in Artificial Neural Networks for Computer Vision

Thomas Chen has been awarded an NSF Fellowship to pursue his research in the design of efficient artificial neural networks for computer vision. Thomas and his group were able to design custom hardware architectures for efficient and high-performance implementations of a sparse coding algorithm called the sparse and independent local network (SAILnet). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Graduate Students  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Zhang, Zhengya  

ECE Welcomes New Engineering Robotics Center

A $54M robotics center is coming to North Campus. It will offer state-of-the-art facilities in a brand-new, 3-story, 100,000 square foot building. ECE faculty are excited at the promise the new space offers for increased collaboration and synergy of effort. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Corso, Jason  Cyber-physical systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  Lafortune, Stephane  Ozay, Necmiye  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Computer Vision  Teneketzis, Demosthenis  

The Crazy-Tiny Next Generation of Computers

This article in Medium describes Prof. Prabal Dutta's interest in Smart Dust - a network of tiny, sensor-enabled autonomous computers - and its ability to to measure everyday data to solve issues of critical sustainability. It traces how he began collaborating with Profs. David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester on the development of the Michigan Micro Mote (M3), which is now the world's smallest and first millimeter scale computer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  

Mobile Friendly - apps to improve life

Prof. Jasprit Singh believes mobile apps can help change lives for the better, and he's built platform technology to help make it happen. Singh and his colleague John Hinckley have consulted with a number of U-M researchers on the development of mobile apps, and by creating a general platform, they can reduce costs and turnaround time. Singh helped Prof. Daniel Eisenberg build Tinyshifts, an app that actively prompts users to answer questions about their mental health issues. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Mobile Computing  Singh, Jasprit  

ECE Ideas Worth Spreading - TEDxUofM

TEDxUofM welcomed two speakers from ECE to its stage to "give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes or less." Profs. Shai Revzen and Herbert Winful spoke about their passion for their work at the sixth annual conference, themed "Constructive Interference." Prof. Winful's talk was titled "How Hidden Passions Can Connect People," and Prof. Revzen's talk was titled "Facing the Unknown, With Robots." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Systems  Revzen, Shai  Winful, Herbert  

This is the worlds smallest computer

CBS News did a video and story about the Michigan Micro Mote (M3), which is the world's smallest computer and the world's first millimeter scale computer. "As the Internet of Things (IoT) gets bigger, the Michigan team is pushing to make computers ever smaller." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  

Seattle Alumni Connect and Celebrate at ECE Networking Event

ECE Alumni of the greater Seattle area gathered for a networking dinner at the World Trade Center on March 19, 2015. The event, sponsored by ECE Alumni Babak Parviz (Amazon) and Dawson Yee (Microsoft), was the first time many alumni in the area had a chance to meet. The evening was such a success, plans are already underway for a follow-up event, in Seattle and around the country. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Elnaz Ansari Earns Towner Prize for Distinguished Academic Achievement

Elnaz Ansari, PhD candidate in EE, has received the Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Prize for Distinguished Academic Achievement. Elnaz implements large-scale analog circuits using automatic design techniques that are mostly used in digital system designs. Using these techniques, she has fabricated a high-speed, high-resolution digital to analog converter (DAC) in 65nm CMOS technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Wentzloff, David  

Fall 2015: Plasmonics

Course No.: EECS 598-007
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Somine Eunice Lee
Prerequisites: None

Course Description:
Plasmonics is the study of optical phenomena related to the electromagnetic response of conductors. The furled of plasmonics has recently been accelerated by the rapid advancements in nano fabrication. The interaction of light with nanoscale objects renders unique optical, electronic, magnetic and thermal properties useful to a wide range of areas, including electrical engineering, biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, material science, chemistry and physics. [More Info]

Students Getting Ready to Race with MHybrid

The Michigan Hybrid Racing Team (MHybrid) unveiled their new formula racecar, and students are hard at work to make the car a success at the Formula Hybrid Competition at Dartmouth on April 27. The car will be tested on its speed, design, and efficiency. The team will take a number of design improvements over previous models to the track, and the electrical group has been busy making them happen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Fall 2015: Power System Dynamics and Control

Course No.: EECS 598-003
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Ian Hiskens
Prerequisites: EECS 463 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will introduce angle and voltage stability concepts and consider control strategies for improving dynamic performance. It will provide and overview of nonlinear dynamical systems, including geometrical properties of solutions, Lyapunov methods for approximating the region of attraction, and bifurcation analysis. [More Info]

Fall 2015: Foundations of Computer Vision

Course No.: EECS 598-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Jason Corso
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor

Course Description:
Computer Vision seeks to extract useful information from images, video and other visual content. This course will introduce the breadth of modern computer vision through a few foundational problems that span various topic areas. Examples of possible foundational problems include image formation and projective geometry, robust model fitting, perceptual priors, matching and similarity, invariance, motion and multi view geometry. The foundational problems will be tied to specific applications such as feature extraction, segmentation, structure from motion, and action recognition. [More Info]

Fall 2015: Hybrid Systems: Specification, Verification and Control

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Necmiye Ozay
Prerequisites: EECS 562 or EECS 560 + permission of instructor

Course Description:
Hybrid systems, dynamical systems where continuous dynamics and discrete events interact, are ubiquitous and can be found in many different contexts. Examples are as diverse as manufacturing processes, biological systems, energy systems, medical devices, robotics systems, automobiles and aircrafts. Advances in computing and communications technologies have enabled engineering such systems with a high degree of complexity. Most of these systems are safety-critical, hence their correctness must be verified before they can be deployed. This course will provide a working knowledge of several analysis and design techniques to guarantee safety, reliability and performance of such systems. [More Info]

Fall 2015: An Introduction to Social, Economic and Technological Networks

Course No.: EECS 498-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Vijay Subramanian
Prerequisites: EE203 and/or EECS 301 are recommended

Course Description:
Networks are everywhere. We encounter a variety of networks of different sizes and forms on a daily basis: societal networks such as the network of retweets of a certain has tag on Twitter or the friends network on Facebook; technological networks such as the Internet with the telecommunication network of computers, the links between webpages, the groupings of users generated by recommendation systems for predictions or the network of users on BitTorrent downloading a specific file; and economic networks such as trade networks or supply-chain networks. Some of these networks emerge naturally such as many societal networks, while others are planned such as the public transportation or road network. We depend on the efficient functioning of these networks to transact many of our activities.

This course serves as an introduction to the broad class of networks described above: how these networks are connected, how they form, how processes and transactions take place on them, and how they are being transferred and interconnected in the modern world. Students will learn how to develop and apply mathematical models and tools from graph theory, linear algebra, probability and game theory in order to analyze network processes such as how opinions and fads are spread on networks, how sponsored advertisements are developed, how web content is displayed, how recommendation systems work, etc. [More Info]

Mastering Illusions Of The Mind

Many students say they went into electrical engineering because the things that engineers do is like magic. One of our alumni, Oz Pearlman, actually became a magician. He followed his passion after spending a few years at Merrill Lynch, honing his craft on the side. He is now a a renowned mentalist who has performed across 6 continents and over 30 countries. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

ECE spinoff Arborlight gets $1.7M in VC funding to commercialize new lighting technology

"Arborlight wants every indoor space to be able to reap the benefits of natural -- or as close to natural -- sunlight, and thanks to a $1.7 million venture capital investment, the company is one step closer to that goal." Arborlight is co-founded by Prof. P.C. Ku. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  Technology Transfer  

Jason Davis: Ph.D. candidate confident yet cautious of future

Crain's Business Detroit sat down with Millennial and ECE staff member Jason Davis to hear how things were going in his life and career. Jason is working as the Alumni Relations Coordinator while pursuing his doctorate in higher education. His passion is issues of diversity and inclusion, something he brings to his work. He is also a regular volunteer for a variety of organizations. [Full Story]

ECE Students Earn CoE Distinguished Leadership Awards

Three ECE students have been awarded the CoE Distinguished Leadership Award. This award recognizes students who have demonstrated outstanding leadership and service to the College, University, and community. Cheng Zhang and Elizabeth Dreyer are both Ph.D. students in electrical engineering, and Lauren Bilbo is an undergraduate senior majoring in electrical engineering. All three are actively involved in student organizations and leadership positions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Guo, L. Jay  Rand, Stephen  Undergraduate Students  

Stephen Forrest Receives 2015 Distinguished University Innovator Award

Stephen Forrest, Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering, has been awarded the 2015 U-M Distinguished University Innovator Award. Prof. Forrest is widely acknowledged as one of the most successful academic inventors and entrepreneurs today. He has participated in the founding of 5 companies which have generated more than 1,000 jobs, holds 271 patents, and published more than 540 papers which have received more than 85,000 citations in Google Scholar. During his tenure as U-M's Vice President for Research, he was responsible for several key initiatives that helped make Michigan a leader in tech transfer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

U-M Develops Controls for Bipedal Robots with Model-Based Design

Developing a two-legged robot capable of walking and running like a human is a key goal for robotics researchers. In 2011, Professor Jessy Grizzle and a small team of Ph.D. students advanced toward that goal with MABEL, a bipedal robot that could run a nine-minute mile and regain its balance after negotiating an eight-inch step. When MABEL's successor, MARLO, needed new coding, the researchers moved away from hand-coding, and used Model-Based Design with MATLAB and Simulink to speed up the development of real-time control systems for MARLO and other bipedal robots. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Michael Stonebraker Receives ACM Turing Award

Michael Stonebraker (MS EE '66, PhD CICE '71) has been named the recipient of the 2014 ACM A.M. Turing Award for fundamental contributions to the concepts and practices underlying modern database systems. The ACM Turing Award, widely considered the Nobel Prize of Computing, carries a $1 million prize with financial support provided by Google, Inc. It is named for Alan M. Turing, the British mathematician who articulated the mathematical foundation and limits of computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

All ECE News for 2015