Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

CSE in the News

Two sentences explaining why your self-driving car wont have a steering wheel

Prof. Edwin Olson comments on why, once an autonomous vehicles is operating, it is actually difficult for a human occupant to take control in an emergency. Prof. Olson is working on projects related to autonomous vehicles and transportation systems at the newly-opened Mcity test facility. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Scientists warn against Artificial Intelligence weapons

Prof. Michael Wellman confirms that the potential for danger from automated weapons systems should be taken seriously in this story that appeared on Detroit ABC affiliate WXYZ. Prof. Wellman was one of over a thousand AI researchers who recently signed a letter to the UN urging them to ban robotic weapons. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

The race is on to figure out what self-driving cars should look like

In this Washington Post article, Prof. Edwin Olson notes that we don't know what autonomous vehicles might look like in the future, since autonomy will change many factors in the way transportation is scheduled and executed. Prof. Olson has just launched a project to study a transportation on demand system built around autonomous vehicles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Why Are Computers So Bad At Jokes?

What is funniness? Can it possibly be quantitative? And why is it so difficult to define -- for, say, a mechanical reproduction of it? These are questions that have plagued scientists for decades. And its the central question that brought together an incredibly diverse group of authors on a new paper looking for an answer, including Prof. Dragomir Radev; The New Yorker's Cartoon Editor, Bob Mankoff; and scientists from Yahoo! and Columbia. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Radev, Dragomir  

3-D Printed Cars Emerging; Early Units will Serve as Testbed for On-Demand System at Michigan

Prof. Edwin Olson will be using 3-D printed low-speed electric vehicles provided by alternative carmaker Local Motors to develop a transportation on demand system built around autonomous vehicles. He is quotes in the article about Local Motors' plans. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

U-M to Test Driverless 3-D Printed Carts

in this article, the Detroit News reports on the University of Michigan's plans to test low-speed, 3-D printed driverless carts within the year and eventually deploy them on its North Campus. Researches led b Prof. Edwin Olson will use the carts to develop an automated on-demand transportation system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Worlds smallest computer can fit on the edge of a nickel

David Blaauw, Dennis Sylvester, David Wentzloff, and Prabal Dutta, as well as several graduate students, have developed tiny computing units (on a millimeter scale) that are capable of harvesting solar power to utilize wireless communication, pressure and temperature sensors, and even still image and video processing. Ready for production now, the M3 is expected to see use in the medical field for monitoring human body processes, as well as conducting EKGs and detecting and monitoring tumor growth. Harkening back to scenes from the 1966 film Fantastic Voyage or 1987s Innerspace, the M3 can actually be injected into the body to perform some of these functions. [Full Story]

Prof. Kevin Fu Testifies on the IRS Data Breach for Senate Committee

As reported on the Computing Community Consortium blog, Prof. Kevin Fu was one of the five witnesses to testify to the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs at a hearing on "The IRS Data Break: Steps to Protect Americans Personal Information." Video from the hearing is available here; Prof. Fu speaks at about 13:00. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Massive Clinton-era Internet bug shows pitfalls of Obama's 'backdoor' proposal

In this CNN Money article, Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted regarding the FBI's request for security backdoors in technology products. "It's a bad idea," he says. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Rumor-detector software IDs disputed claims on Twitter

Prof. Qiaozhu Mei and a team of researchers have developed software to help society identify and correct erroneous claims on Twitter. They introduced the software recently at the International World Wide Web Conference in Florence, Italy. Later this summer, they hope to put it in practice at a website they're developing called Rumor Lens. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mei, Qiaozhu  

New data science major aligns with growing corporate needs

The Michigan Daily reports on the new data science major, which will be subsumed under the Computer Science and Engineering division and the Statistics Department. The new major will be available in Fall 2015 to both LSA and Engineering students. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Prakash, Atul  

New Computer Bug Exposes Broad Security Flaws

The Wall Street Journal reports on the newly-discovered Logjam bug, which could allow an attacker to read or alter communications that claim to be secure and may have been exploited by the National Security Agency to spy on virtual private networks, or VPNs. The vulnerability could also be exploited by hackers. CSE Graduate student Zakir Durumeric, one of the researchers working on the bug, is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Your House Is Your Next Fit Band

This article in Discovery highlights a Wi-Fi based approach to a local area fitness monitoring system prototyped at MIT. It includes commentary by U-M Prof. Fu, who sees potential for the system, especially in cases where typical sensor placement is not viable. He does, however, have concerns about WiFi security for medical data transmission. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Digital democracy: will 2015 be the last paper-based general election?

There is a growing call for on-line voting in the UK with Estonia's system seen by some as a model, as discussed in this article in The Telegraph. However, work by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and others, including Halderman's 2014 assessment of the Estonian systems, point to major risks in the system [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

US hospitals to treat medical device malware with AC power probes

This article in The Register highlights plans for testing in two hospitals of a system that can detect malware infections on medical equipment by monitoring AC power consumption. Former CSE postdoc Denis Foo Kune developed the technology, called WattsUpDoc, with Prof. Kevin Fu and others while at Michigan. They have commercialized it through their startup, Virta Labs. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

13 Of 2015s Hottest Topics In Computer Science Research

In this contributed piece on Forbes, Prof. Igor Markov presents his view of where computer science research will be focused in the near term. It's a list worth reviewing! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

At 50 Years Old, The Challenge To Keep Up With Moores Law

NPRs All Tech Considered: Fifty years ago this week, a chemist in what is now Silicon Valley published a paper that set the groundwork for the digital revolution. That man was Gordon Moore. Moores Law is all about electronic miniaturization, and the article talks about the worlds smallest computer, the Michigan Micro Mote, currently on display at the Computer History Museum. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

The Crazy-Tiny Next Generation of Computers

This article in Medium describes Prof. Prabal Dutta's interest in Smart Dust - a network of tiny, sensor-enabled autonomous computers - and its ability to to measure everyday data to solve issues of critical sustainability. It traces how he began collaborating with Profs. David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester on the development of the Michigan Micro Mote (M3), which is now the world's smallest and first millimeter scale computer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  

Machine politics: Electronic voting and the persistent doubts about its integrity

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborator Dr. Vanessa Teague are interviewed on Up Close, the research talk show from the University of Melbourne, about their work in investigating the iVote system recently used in New South Wales and about the security challenges of electronic voting in general. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

OpenSource.com: A case for predictable databases

Prof. Barzan Mozafari is interviewed in this Q&A on OpenSource.com about his open source DBSeer and DBSherlock database tools, and about guaranteeing a consistent and predictable level of performance is cloud-based database systems [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  

This is the worlds smallest computer

CBS News did a video and story about the Michigan Micro Mote (M3), which is the world's smallest computer and the world's first millimeter scale computer. "As the Internet of Things (IoT) gets bigger, the Michigan team is pushing to make computers ever smaller." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  

Why you arent voting for Chicago mayor from a smartphone

This article in the Chicago Tribune summarizes why Chicago voters won't be casting online votes in April 7's mayoral runoff election. Although other transactions can be accomplished by smartphone, "the shape of the problem is fundamentally different than things we routinely do online today," says Prof. J. Alex Halderman in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

The Hackathon Fast Track, From Campus to Silicon Valley

This article in the New York Times examines the phenomenon of hackathons and how they have become a new fast track to success in the tech industry. Quoted are CS major and director of the past two MHacks, Vikram Rajagopalan, as well as David Fontenot, a former MHacks director. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Smart Phone Apps: An Interview with Prof. Georg Essl (in German)

Prof. Georg Essl is interviewed on German public radio (WDR) on the subject of smart phone apps and their potential as musical instruments. The interview includes numerous musical examples from Essl's Michigan Mobile Phone Ensemble. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Essl, Georg  Lab-Interactive Systems  Michigan Mobile Phone Ensemble  Mobile Computing  

Our Data, Our Health. A Future Tense Event Recap.

This blog posting on Slate addresses threats to medical device security and highlights the thoughts of Prof. Kevin Fu on the matter. Prof. Fu directs the Archimedes Medical Device Research Center at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Probing the Whole Internet for Weak Spots

This article in MIT Technology Review profiles the work of CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric. Durumeric led in the development of ZMap, the software capable of probing the entire public Internet in less than an hour. Through the use of ZMap, Durumeric was first person to realize the scope of the FREAK flaw. His use of ZMap was also pivotal to researchers' understanding of the recent Heartbleed flaw. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Voice Control Will Force an Overhaul of the Whole Internet

This article in Wired reports on Sirius, the open-source personal digital assistant released by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang and graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focused in in the projects underlying thrust: that the data centers of today are not built to accommodate the voice-based data loads of tomorrow. Sirius is a tool that will help researchers to understand the needs of next-generation data centers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Critical iVote security flaws expose risk of online voting fraud

This article in CNet covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  

Australian online voting system may have FREAK bug

This article in The Register covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

NSW election result could be challenged over iVote security flaw

This article in The Guardian covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Edwin Olson: Driverless Cars (radio interview)

In this radio interview on Newstalk ZB in New Zealand, Prof. Edwin Olson discusses the future of autonomous vehicles, how autonomy might be introduced into the marketplace, and M City, the automated test track for autonomous vehicle research and testing at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Researchers just built a free, open-source version of Siri

This article in VentureBeat reports on Sirius, the open-source intelligent personal assistant software introduced by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, along with graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focuses on the open-source nature of Sirius and quotes the researchers regarding its possibilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Engineers Bring A New Open-Source Siri To Life

This article in readwrite reports on Sirius, the open-source intelligent personal assistant software introduced by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, along with graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focuses in part on the open-source nature of Sirius and the potential that creates for anyone to create a customized personal assistant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Free Sirius One-Ups Siri

This article in EE Times reports on Sirius, the open-source intelligent personal assistant software introduced by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, along with graduate student Johann Hauswald. The article focuses in part on Sirius's ability to process photos. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

What You Tweet Might Tell Janet Yellen Its Time to Raise Rates

Economists at the Fed are looking into whether non-traditional data could improve the accuracy and timeliness of the forecasts they put before monetary-policy decision makers about every six weeks. This could include Prof. Mike Cafarella's social media tool that monitors tweets to create an index of initial claims for unemployment. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Software Systems  Social Media  

Sirius Is the Google-Backed Open Source Siri

This article in Motherboard discusses Sirius, the open-source digital assistant developed by CSE researchers, its ability to process images, its open-source roots, and ultimately reflects on its utility versus a past attempt in this realm. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Chappie ponders future of humans in a world run on artificial intelligence

Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja is quoted in this article in The Washington Times on the emergence of artificial intelligence and the need for controls to be established before AI can operate independently of human oversight. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Security Concerns Raised Regarding Clinton Offices Use of Private Email

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted regarding security concerns in this Al Jazeera America article on Hillary Clinton's use of a private email service while in office as Secretary of State. Prof. Halderman has previously demonstrated vulnerabilities in the security of a number of trusted systems, including airport body scanners and electronic voting systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Outdated Encryption Keys Leave Phones Vulnerable to Hackers

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric have used their ZMap scanning software to determine that of the 14 million web sites worldwide that offer encryption, more than 5 million remain vulnerable to the FREAK encryption flaw as of March 4. Prof. Halderman is quoted on the danger of weak crypto and "back doors" in this New York Times article on the subject. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Researchers Map Extent of FREAK Security Flaw

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric have used their ZMap scanning software to determine that of the 14 million web sites worldwide that offer encryption, more than 5 million remain vulnerable to the FREAK encryption flaw as of March 4. The U-M researchers are part of a broad effort that has demonstrated the dangers inherent in the older 512-bit encryption code that is still in use. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Careers in Robotics: Spotlight on the University of Michigan

This article in Robotics Business Review takes a look at robotics research at Michigan, in particular the work in perception and autonomy that is being conducted by Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice. It also examines how that research is a key ingredient in the work to be done on autonomous vehicles at Michigan's new Mobility Transportation Center. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Cooking robot may offer artificial culinary intelligence

Prof. Jason Corso was asked to comment on research that involved the use of artificial intelligence to provide robots with the ability to recognize objects and learn actions by watching humans. In this case, the robot was watching a video. He said it is possible to reconstruct the 3D environment (2D space plus time) that is being shown in the video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Corso, Jason  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Coding For Kids: Teaching Girls, Minorities To Program Important For A Diverse Tech Workforce

This story on the International Business Times website speaks about creating a new generation of programmers by reaching out to demographics that historically haven't considered coding as a profession. In it, Prof. Elliot Soloway says, "Coding is about giving kids the new pencil and paper, it's giving them the new typewriter, the new tool to say things that they couldn't say before." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Programming  Soloway, Elliot  

Olson on Mobility Transformation Facility

In this audio interview, Prof. Edwin Olson speaks about the 36-acre Mobility Transformation Facility at Michigan and his work in developing and testing technologies for use in autonomous vehicles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Talking Book trial to help poorest of poor in Ghana

[BBC News: Nov 20] Hundreds of handheld audio computers, called Talking Books, are to be given to some of Ghana's poorest communities to help spread potentially life-saving information. Leading the low power chip design for the devices at Michigan are Profs. David Blaauw and Peter Chen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Chen, Peter  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Can Hackers Get Into Your Pacemaker?

Prof. Kevin Fu is quoted in this article in The Atlantic, which summarizes a number of factors that contribute toward vulnerabilities in medical devices like insulin pumps, defibrillators, fetal monitors, and scanners. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Estonia has online voting. Should the United States?

Vox takes a look at voting in Estonia, a country that is an early adopter of online voting. The article notes that the convenience of the system is outweighed by the security risks inherent in such systems and references the work done by Prof. J. Alex Halderman in exposing weaknesses in the Estonian system and in an earlier proposed system in Washington DC. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Hackers Could Decide Who Controls Congress Thanks to Alaskas Terrible Internet Ballots

In today's elections, Alaska will use its first-in-the-nation Internet voting system in today's mid-term elections -- a move that top security experts, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, consider a security nightmare that could put control of the US Congress in the hands of hackers. More in this article at The Intercept. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Decode DC: The Future of Voting. Prof J. Alex Halderman Interviewed on Electronic Voting

In this podcast, host Andrea Seabrook and Decode DC reporter Miranda Green explore the potential benefits and risks of on-line voting. Coming down in the side of caution is Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who has demonstrated security vulnerabilities in voting systems worldwide and who says that "the problem with voting and computer technology is that hackers can change the election result to be whatever they want." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

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