Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

CSE in the News

Vulnerable connected devices a matter of "homeland security"

This article describes the security ramifications of unprotected IoT devices such as internet-connected cameras, video recorders on the larger Internet. It quotes Prof. Kevin Fu on the effort that would be required to secure this new ecosystem. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

After Dyn cyberattack, lawmakers seek best path forward

In a hearing hosted by the House Energy and Commerce Committee, University of Michigan professor Kevin Fu, Level 3 Communications Chief Security Officer Dale Drew and computer security luminary Bruce Schneier briefed Congress on the challenges posed by insecure internet-connected devices and whether they believe the government can make a difference. This article provides a summary of the proceedings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

How You Speak To Siri & Alexa Matters More Than You Think Here's Why

Prof. Rada Mihalcea is quoted in this story about sexism and today's virtual assistants such as Amazon's Alexa, Apple's Siri and Microsoft's Cortana. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

Provost and former CSE Assoc. Chair Martha Pollack named president at Cornell University

Former Associate Chair of CSE and Dean of the School of Information Martha Pollack has been named President of Cornell University. Our congratulations! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Pollack, Martha  

The Network Standard Used in Cars Is Wide Open to Attack

As automobiles grow increasingly computerized, the security of the network for in-vehicle communication is a growing security concern. New research by Prof. Kang G. Shin and graduate student Kyong-Tak Cho demonstrates that the controller area network (CAN) protocol implemented by in-vehicle networks has a new and potentially quite dangerous vulnerability. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Networks and Networking  Security (Computing)  Shin, Kang G.  

How Safe is Your Smart Home?

The Smart Home sounds like a great idea. But is it an unsafe home? "I would be cautious, overall," says Prof. Atul Prakash. "The technology is relatively new. Hardware is probably a little bit ahead of the software at this point, and a lot of vulnerabilities we are seeing are primarily on the software side of things." Read more and listen to the full interview here. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  

A Lot Of Voting Machines Are Broken Across America (But It's Totally Normal)

Forbes reports on numerous reports of broken machines causing epic queues and peeving voters. Matt Bernhard, CSE graduate student and an expert on the security of electoral systems, says that "This year isn't that different, other than I'm expecting higher turnout which may stress the infrastructure more." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

US election: Experts keep watch over 'hack states'

"Unless the election is extraordinarily close, it is unlikely that an attack will result in the wrong candidate getting elected," suggest CSE graduate student Matt Bernhard and Prof. J. Alex Halderman. But they say the risk the election process could be disrupted by hackers should be taken extremely seriously. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Next Weeks Anticipated U.S. Election

This article discusses the vulnerabilities of direct recording electronic voting systems. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his colleagues on the security of DREs. Twenty-nine states still use DREs and five states: Delaware, Georgia, Louisiana, New Jersey and South Carolina, use the easily compromised machines without a paper trail. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

US Election Systems Seen 'Painfully Vulnerable' to Cyberattack

This article sheds light on potential cyberattacks during the U.S election. Some cybersecurity analysts warned that hackers of even moderate talent could possibly throw the results of the 2016 presidential election into chaos. Prof. Halderman hopes all the attention on voting-system vulnerabilities will motivate state governments to invest in cybersecurity for the 2020 elections. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Forget rigged polls: Internet voting is the real election threat

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his contemporaries have been tireless in warning us of the security risks associated with internet voting. Will we listen? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

The Security Challenges of Online Voting Have Not Gone Away

This guest post on IEEE Spectrum by CSE graduate student Matthew Bernhard, Prof. J. Alex Halderman, and Robert Cunningham, Chair of the IEEE Cybersecurity Initiative, lays out the details for the case against Internet voting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Hacking Your Health (video)

What security weaknesses exist in hospitals and health care providers? Prof. Kevin Fu, Director of the University of Michigans Archimedes Center for Medical Device Security, comments on medical device security on CNBC News. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Health  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

How the 2016 Election Could Be Hacked (story+video)

Is our voting system really vulnerable to hackers? Professor of computer science, J. Alex Halderman, explains the situation to VICE News in this segment that originally aired on October 24. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

$800K in Research Awards Aim to Address Data Science

Four research teams from the University of Michigan and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China are sharing $800,000 in awards to use data science techniques to address big challenges. Prof. Atul Prakash is co-PI for a project that aims to develop algorithms and mechanism design to incentivize users to charge electric vehicles at appropriate times and locations, leading to better load management, a more reliable grid, and cost savings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Electric Vehicles and HEVs  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  

Video Friday: Robot Patrol, Tickling Machine, and More From IROS 2016

This IEEE Spectrum collection of research project videos from the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) includes a piece on robot navigation in dynamic social environments from Prof. Edwin Olson's APRIL Lab. To see the Michigan video, scroll to the bottom of the page. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics  

Matthew Bernhard on the Steve Gruber Show (audio)

Matthew Bernhard, a CSE graduate student working with Prof. J. Alex Halderman, speaks on the Steve Gruber Show about the possibility for voting fraud in Michigan during the upcoming election. He is introduced just over one minute into the show. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

How to (Really) Steal an Election (audio)

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is interviewed on the dangers posed by electronic voting in this story. The story covers all types of concerns regarding elections, from Donald Trump's warning of a rigged election through the Bush v. Gore contest and the use of electronic voting systems. Halderman appears at about 20:15. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

U-M to build $75-million robotics hub

Robotic technologies for air, sea, and roads, and for factories, hospitals, and homes will have tailored lab space in the University of Michigan's planned Robotics Laboratory. Prof. Jessy Grizzle has been named director of robotics at U-M, and is leading the new facility's planning and development. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

Teslas big bet: $8,000 worth of self-driving hardware in all new cars before the software is ready

In this article, Prof. Edwin Olson is quoted discussing the reliability of autonomous vehicles. Tesla recently announced that all new cars will be equipped with the hardware needed for full self-driving capability. Olson believes theres still a long way to go until self-driving cars become widespread. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

This Is Why We Still Cant Vote Online

This article highlights the work done by security researchers to demonstrate the dangers inherent in the use of paperless electronic voting systems. It spotlights work done by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his students in 2010, when they accepted a challenge to hack Washington DC's proposed new Internet system. The research team was able to hack the system, steal records, and modify it to play the Michigan fight song -- all in less than two days. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Rigging the Election

Jason Smith, writer and director of the documentary "I Voted?", references work done by Prof. J. Alex Halderman in demonstrating the vulnerabilities of electronic voting systems in this opinion piece. Mr. Smith's mission has been to reinforce the message that "Nothing is more important to the future of our democracy than ensuring the integrity of all elections." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Experts: State Should Audit Election Results

Since hackers have targeted the election systems of more than 20 states, cyber-security experts including Prof. J. Alex Halderman say Michigan should change its policy and routinely audit a sample of its paper ballots to protect against election fraud. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

As cyberthreats multiply, hackers now target medical devices

This article, which quotes Prof. Kevin Fu, describes the threat of malware for implantable medical devices and for hospital systems. Because these systems were typically designed without security in mind, "There is no [impervious] device," says Prof. Fu. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Looking for a Choice of Voices in A.I. Technology

This article in the New York Times examines conversational computing in connection with gender and race. Prof. Jason Mars is featured in the article and he highlights the challenges associated with choosing voices for AI technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  

Cybersecurity and Voting Machine Security (video)

Prof. J. Alex Halderman appeared on C-SPAN to discuss vulnerabilities associated with electronic voting and to answer viewer questions. It's worth viewing this 40-minute video segment of the C-SPAN airing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Technology Will Destroy Democracy Unless This Man Stops It

This article provides an in-depth profile of Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his research in the area of security, in particular his work in exposing the security vulnerabilities of electronic voting systems and his additional work in the area of internet anticensorship. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Why Can't We Vote Online?

This article on the security concerns associated with Internet voting points to the 2010 hack of the District of Columbia's internet voting system by researchers led by Prof. J. Alex Halderman as a prime example of what could go wrong. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Flint might have a bigger problem with lead pipes than previously thought

Prof. Jacob Abernethy and his research collaborators have concluded that Flint city records are highly inaccurate and that more public service water lines than expected that contain lead. Prof. Abernethy, together with his students and other researchers, is using multiple data sources to develop predictive software that will identify locations in Flint that are most at risk for lead contamination. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Far more Flint homes have lead lines than expected, report shows

A new report issued by U-M researchers, including Prof. Jacob Abernethy, concludes that Flint city records are highly inaccurate and that more public service water lines than expected contain lead. Prof. Abernethy, together with his students and other researchers, is using multiple data sources to develop predictive software that will identify locations in Flint that are most at risk for lead contamination. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Medical Devices Should Withstand Rigor, Expert Says

When it comes to managing medical device security risk, hospital administrators should focus on weathering the storm and not necessarily prevention, Prof. Kevin Fu, a noted medical device security expert, encouraged this week. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

A Brief Chronology of Medical Device Security

This article in the Communications of the ACM, co-written by Prof. Peter Honeyman, reviews the current era of cyber threat to medical device security. The article concludes with a look forward at steps necessary to secure medical devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Honeyman, Peter  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  

Progress in AI, through collaborative research

Guru Banavar, Chief Science Officer and VP for Cognitive Computing at IBM Research, has blogged about IBM's university partnerships to advance cognitive computing, including work at CSE led by Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja to develop the next generation of conversational interface technologies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Cognitive Science & Architectures  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Despite Flaws, Paperless Voting Machines Remain Widespread in the U.S.

This article surveys problems associated with aging and insecure electronic voting systems. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, a leading researcher in this area, as saying, "Clearly we still have a long way to go to ensure that all Americans have access to a form of voting technology they can trust." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Prof. Emerita Lynn Conway to Receive Honorary Degree from University of Victoria

Prof. Emerita Lynn Conway will receive an honorary degree from the University of Victoria - the university's highest academic honor - during fall the convocation ceremony on Nov. 9 in the University Centre Farquhar Auditorium. Prof. Conway will be recognized for her pioneering work in VLSI and as a leading activist for transgender rights. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  

A hot new app is hoping to change the way you manage your money

This article reports on Clinc, the intelligent personal assistant startup headed by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang. At the Finovate conference, Clinc introduced Finie, the planet's most intelligent personal financial assistant that helps everyone talk to their bank accounts in a natural and conversational way to get real-time and instant financial insights. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  Technology Transfer  

Paperless voting could fuel 'rigged' election claims

This article describes the concern that talk of a potentially "rigged" election could undermine confidence in results. Amongst the issues associated with electronic voting is that many systems do not produce paper backups that could be used for verification, according to Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

An experimental policing tool is gaining traction across the country and there are major civil-liberties concerns

This article on the use of data for predictive policing points to the possibility that those practices could lead to racial profiling and aggressive policing. It quotes HV Jagadish, Bernard A. Galler Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, on the subject. He suggests that police departments haven't struck the right balance between more efficiently targeting crime and avoiding civil-liberties conflicts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  

Expert Questions Claim That St. Jude Pacemaker Was Hacked

This article reports on the work done by Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators, which has called into question the allegations of security flaws in St. Jude Medical's pacemakers and other life-saving medical devices. The claim of security holes was made by short-selling investment research firm Muddy Waters Capital LLC and medical device security firm MedSec Ltd [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  

Guarding Presidential Election Vote Integrity Presents a Daunting Task

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted in this article regarding election integrity. He points out that any election system must be able to prove that results are accurate in order to dispel concerns about vote rigging. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

New Concerns About Hacks Into State Voting Systems

Prof. J. Alex Halderman was a guest on the Diane Rehm show on August 31, where the conversation included discussion of the security of elections. Click the "Listen" button under the headline to hear the interview; the discussion with Prof. Halderman begins at 20:30. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Hacking Report on St. Jude Pacemakers Was Flawed, Researchers Say

This article details how a report on cybersecurity vulnerabilities in St. Jude Medicals implantable heart devices released last week by short sellers was flawed and didnt prove the flaws existed, according to a review by University of Michigan researchers including Prof. Kevin Fu. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

University study finds flaws in criticism of St. Jude cyber security

This article reports on the work done by Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators, which has called into question the allegations of security flaws in St. Jude Medical's pacemakers and other life-saving medical devices. The claim of security holes was released last week by short-selling investment research firm Muddy Waters Capital LLC and medical device security firm MedSec Ltd. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Meet DDoSCoin, the Cryptocurrency that Pays When You P0wn

This article in the Register reports on the research conducted by CSE alum Eric Wustrow and CSE student Benjamin VanderSloot. They created a proof-of-work project built on cryptocurrency that offers a means to prove participation in distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. DDoSCoin allows miners to prove that they have contributed to a distributed denial of service attack against specific target servers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  

New Cryptocurrency DDoSCoin Incentivizes Users for Participating in DDoS Attacks

The article reports on the new research paper by CSE alum Eric Wustrow and CSE student Benjamin VanderSloot. The researchers have put forward the concept of DDoSCoin a cryptocurrency with a malicious proof-of-work. Presented at the Usenix 2016 security conference, the researchers explain the DDoSCoin system which enables miners to select the victim servers by consensus using a proof-of-stake protocol. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  

Online voting could be really convenient. But its still probably a terrible idea.

This article reports on Internet voting availability in the US. It then examines Estonia's electronic voting system, which has been been hailed by some as a model system for secure electronic voting. Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who was part of a security team that documented failings in the Estonian system, disagrees and is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Algorithms Can be More Fair than Humans

In this article in The Conversation, Prof. H. V. Jagadish talks about how algorithms can discriminate, even when their designers don't intend that to happen, but they also can make detecting bias easier. He states, While it is tempting to believe data-driven decisions are unbiased, research and scholarly discussion are beginning to demonstrate that unfairness and discrimination remain. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jagadish, HV  

Hackers Fool Tesla Autopilot Into Making Obstacles 'Disappear' -- But Don't Panic About Crashes Yet

Wenyuan Xu, a visiting professor at CSE from the University of South Carolina, is part of a research team that has developed techniques for sabotaging the sensors for the autopilot in a Tesla. This article in Forbes describes how the research team used three forms of attack to tick the Tesla. [Full Story]

Hackers Fool Tesla S's Autopilot to Hide and Spoof Obstacles

Wenyuan Xu, a visiting professor at CSE from the University of South Carolina, is part of a research team that has developed techniques for sabotaging the sensors for the autopilot in a Tesla. This article in Wired describes how they simulated an attack from an adjacent car equipped with sensor jamming equipment. [Full Story]

CSE Researchers Win Pwnie Award for Work on DROWN Attack

A research team that includes CSE PhD student David Adrian and Prof. J. Alex Halderman has been awarded the Pwnie Award for Best Cryptographic Attack at the BlackHat conference for their work on the DROWN attack. DROWN is a serious vulnerability that affects HTTPS and other services that rely on SSL and TLS, some of the essential cryptographic protocols for Internet security. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

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