Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

CSE in the News

Sony Wants to Push AIs to Learn From Their Own Experiences

Sony has invested in AI startup Cogitai to build intelligent systems that will learn from their own experiences in the world. Prof. Satinder Singh, the co-founder of Cogitai, discusses continual learning and the future of intelligent systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Malware Attacks Putting Patients' Medical Records at Risk

Prof. Kevin Fu talks to Michigan Radio about the recent news stories regarding some U.S. hospitals being hit by malware attacks. When hospitals are hit, patient records can be in danger. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  

More Than 30 States Offer Online Voting, but Experts Warn it isnt Secure

This article revisits the question of online voting. Prof. Halderman cites a pilot project from six years ago in DC where the public was invited to attack a proposed Internet voting system. Halderman led a team that within 48 hours was able to gain nearly complete control of the server and change every vote. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Your Devices' Latest Feature? They Can Spy on Your Every Move

In The Converstation, Prof. HV Jagadish sheds light on how smart devices are a gateway for hackers to spy on you. Since devices are networked, they can communicate in ways we dont want them to and people can take control of these technologies to learn private information about you. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

For Michigan Professor, Computer Science is Much More Than a Job

This article reports on Prof. Jason Mars and his work in developing technologies for intelligent personal assistants, from the software for the assistants themselves to the servers that are required to run such software. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  

5 big challenges that self-driving cars still have to overcome

in this article, Prof. Edwin Olson comments on what are seen are the key challenges involved in deploying autonomous or assistive driving technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

UM professors, students lead startup with real-world uses for AI technology

This article profiles Clinc, the artificial intelligence startup founded by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang with CSE graduate students Michael Laurenzano and Johann Hauswald. Clinc is based in Ann Arbor and uses intelligent personal assistant technology to fuel new applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Numbers Game

This article in Michigan Research examines the growing importance of sports analytics and describes the work of Prof. Jenna Wiens in using machine learning to extract information from NBA sports data for automatically recognizing common defense strategies to ball screens. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

Google Self-Driving Car Will Be Ready Soon for Some, in Decades for Others

This article reports on a talk given by Chris Urmson, Google self-driving car project director, at the SXSW conference, in which he seemed to reset expectations regarding the arrival autonomous vehicles. The article includes comments by Prof. Edwin Olson, who researches self-driving cars at UM and who is quite familiar with the technical challenges that remain to be addressed before such vehicles become ubiquitous. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Attack against TLS shows the pitfalls of weakening encryption

This article describes how, for the third time in a year, security researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman have found a method to attack encrypted Web communications, a direct result of weaknesses that were mandated two decades ago by the U.S. government. The latest instance is the DROWN attack. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

'Thousands of popular sites' at risk of Drown hack attacks

This article describes how researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman have discovered a new way to disable popular internet encryption protocols. Their "DROWN" attack takes advantage of past government rules against strong encryption in technology to be exported. The rules have since changed, but the effects live on. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Drown attack: how weakened encryption jeopardizes 'secure' sites

This article describes how researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman have succeeded in attacking "secure" connections that are used in email, news and entertainment services. The article notes that the technique could affect up to one third of all websites that use secure communications and is a legacy of past efforts to water down online encryption. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

How to know when your boss is lying to you

This article in Mashable describes "tells" for when someone is lying. It includes a mention of new software developed by Prof. Rada Mihalcea and her collaborators that is better able to identify deception than human observers are. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

President Obama Announces Computer Science for All

President Obama has announced a new Computer Science for All initiative to empower all American students from kindergarten through high school to learn CS and be equipped with the computational thinking skills they need to be creators in the digital economy, not just consumers, and to be active citizens in our technology-driven world. [Full Story]

Internet voting is just too hackable, say security experts

This article revisits the question of Internet voting, and reviews the reasons why these systems have been proven unreliable in the past. Prof. J. Alex Halderman, a prominent researcher in this area who has demonstrated vulnerabilities in many types of electronic voting systems, is quoted: "Imagine the incentives of a rival country to come in and change the outcome of a vote for national leadership. Elections require correct outcomes and true ballot secrecy." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Driverless cars work great in sunny California. But how about in a blizzard?

This article quotes Prof. Edwin Olson regarding the research he is doing in conjunction with Ford on autonomous vehicles and their use in conditions that include snow-covered roads. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Even your academic advisor might one day be a robot

This article in Engadget highlights the new research collaboration between Michigan and IBM, which is aimed at building a conversationally-driven, artificially intelligent academic advisor that guides undergraduate students through their course options [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

The Story of a Digital Teddy Bear Shows How College Learning Is Changing

This story highlights the changing nature of education, driven in part by computationally-enabled entrepreneurship. Hackathons such as MHacks at U-M and other "outside the classroom" activities have created new opportunities for students to manage their own educations. The digital teddy bears highlighted in the story came to life as a project at MHacks 6. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship  

Researchers make progress on holy grail of autonomous vehicles: driving in snow

This story by Michigan Radio talks about testing autonomous cars on snow covered roads. The new research was done by Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice in collaboration with Ford. The new research shows it's possible for a self-driving car to get around using highly detailed 3D maps of everything that surrounds the vehicle. The news was also featured in their top of the hour news summary, please click here to listen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Fairy doors appear on University of Michigan's North Campus

San Francisco's SF Gate has noted the appearance of Fairy Doors on North Campus, including the first -- discovered by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, her daughter, and research fellow Carmen Banea -- which was found in CSE's Beyster Building. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  Mihalcea, Rada  

Ford tests driverless cars in snow at U-M's Mcity

This article in MLive covers work done by Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice in collaboration with Ford at Mcity, in which the researchers have tested new technology that allows autonomous vehicles to navigate on snow-covered streets. Their solution combines live LIDAR data with learned 3D map stores to enable the systems to compute location and to drive successfully. It is believed that this is the first test to address the challenges of snow-covered roads. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Fairy doors appearing on U-M's North Campus

This story in MLive reports on the recent appearances of Fairy Doors on North Campus. The first, discovered by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, her daughter, and research fellow Carmen Banea, was found in CSE's Beyster Building. Since then, the story reports, two more have been found in the Chrysler Center. We're glad the fairies have come to stay! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  Mihalcea, Rada  

The 'skyscraper chip' that could boost the power of computers by a THOUSAND

This arrticle highlights the called Nano-Engineered Computing Systems Technology (N3XT) project, a carbon nanotube transistor based stacked mricochip architecture under development by researchers at Stanford, Michigan, CMU, and UC Berkeley, including Prof. Igor Markov. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

How computers are getting better at detecting liars

This article highlights the lie-detecting software that was created by Prof. Rada Mihalcea. Using videos from high-stakes court cases, the researchers have built a lie-detecting software database that uses a persons words and gestures to detect behavioral patterns that may be out of the norm. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

New software analyses words, gestures to detect lies

This Economic Times article highlights Prof. Rada Mihalceas research. She is developing a unique lie-detecting software that considers both the speaker's words and gestures, and unlike a polygraph, does not need to touch the subject in order to work. By studying videos from high-stakes court cases she is building the lie-detecting software based on real-world data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

A Search Engine for the Internets Dirty Secrets

This MIT Technology Review article highlights a new search engine called Censys, which aims to help security researchers find specific hosts and create aggregate reports by tracking all the devices hooked up to it. Data is harvested through the software ZMap and the researchers are trying to maintain a complete database of everything on the Internet. The open-sourced project is led by CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Why medical devices are so hard to secure

In this article, Prof. Kevin Fu addresses the security of medical devices. Many of the aging medical devices still in wide use in hospitals across the U.S. were built without much consideration for security controls. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Medical device security? Forget hackers, think 'hand-washing'

In this article, Prof. Kevin Fu talks about the potentially dangerous faults in implants and bedside devices. Fu states, if you're using this old software, these old operating systems, you're vulnerable to all that malware that garden-variety malware that has been out in the wild for more than 10 years. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Could hackers break my heart via my pacemaker?

This BBC article highlights Prof. Kevin Fu's first peer-reviewed paper describing an attack on a heart device. Fu and his team made a combination pacemaker and defibrillator deliver electric shocks, a potentially fatal hack had the device been in a patient rather than a computing lab. The article addresses the publics concern about the security of pacemakers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Creating a formula to detect lies in the face (Spanish)

This article reports on research conducted by Prof. Rada Mihalcea and her collaborators in the area of deception detection. The researchers have produced a computer algorithm that is significantly better at spotting lies in courtroom testimony than humans are. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computational Linguistics  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mihalcea, Rada  

New Research: Encouraging trends and emerging threats in email security

This Google security blog entry highlights recent findings from an analysis of email delivery security. Google will leverage the findings to improve the security provided through its Gmail service and to warn its users when messages are not secure. The study was conducted by Michigan researchers J. Alex Halderman, Zakir Durumeric, David Adrian, Ariana Mirian, and James Kasten along with rsearchers from the University of Illinois and Google. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Gmail Will Soon Warn Users When Emails Arrive Over Unencrypted Connections

This article in Tech Crunch highlights recent findings from an analysis of email delivery security. Google will leverage the findings to improve the security provided through its Gmail service and to warn its users when messages are not secure. The study was conducted by Michigan researchers J. Alex Halderman, Zakir Durumeric, David Adrian, Ariana Mirian, and James Kasten along with rsearchers from the University of Illinois and Google. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Lie-detecting algorithm spots fibbing faces better than humans

This article in New Scientist highlights the work of postdoctoral fellows Veronica Perez-Rosas and Mohamed Abouelenien, Prof. Rada Mihalcea, and Prof. Mihai Burzo in using machine learning to detect whether a person is being deceptive or not. The system outperforms the best human interrogators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computational Linguistics  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mihalcea, Rada  

Email Encryption is Broken

This article in Motherboard highlights research which found that large chunks of email traffic are being deliberately stripped of their encryption, or just sent without any in the first place, leaving them totally open to passive eavesdroppers. Amongst the study's authors are Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate students Zakir Durumeric, David Adrian, Ariana Mirian, and James Kasten. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

This Common Cryptography Method Is Alarmingly Vulnerable

This blog posting on Slate examines the recent paper presented by Prof. Halderman and other researchers at the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security. The paper reveals the vulnerabilities of the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, which is a method for two parties to securely share a cryptographic key that was first published in 1976 and is widely used. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

How the NSA can Break Trillions of Encrypted Web and VPN connections

Privacy advocates have pushed developers of websites, virtual private network apps, and other cryptographic software to adopt the Diffie-Hellman cryptographic key exchange as a defense against surveillance from the US National Security Agency and other state-sponsored spies. Now, Prof. Alex Halderman and other researchers are renewing their warning that a serious flaw in the way the key exchange is implemented is allowing the NSA to break and eavesdrop on trillions of encrypted connections. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Research Shows How NSA Exploits Flaws to Decrypt Huge Amounts of Communications Instead of Securing the Internet

According to an award-winning paper, which was co-authored by Prof. Alex Halderman, the NSA has likely used its access to vast computing power as well as weaknesses in the commonly used TLS security protocol in order to spy on encrypted communications. The paper represents a major contribution to public understanding by drawing a link between the NSAs computing resources and previously known cryptographic weaknesses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

NSA may be Breaking Popular Algorithm

A popular algorithm, known as the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, is vulnerable to state-sponsored attackers, according to a new research paper presented at the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security, which was co-authored by Prof. Alex Halderman. Diffie-Hellman is used to secure websites, email and other protocols. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

From search to distributed computing to large-scale information extraction

Prof. Michael Cafarella was interviewed for the O'Reilly Daily Show Podcast, and excerpts from that conversation are published here. In the interview, he talks about the origins of Nutch, Hadoop (HDFS, MapReduce), HBase, and his decision to pursue an academic career and step away from these projects. They also discussed ClearCutAnalytics, his startup to commercialize a highly regarded academic project for structured data extraction. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Software Systems  

Brilliant 10: Alex Halderman Strengthens Democracy Using Software

For the 14th year, Popular Science honors the brightest young minds in science and engineering. Prof. J. Alex Halderman has been named one of their Brilliant 10 for exposing the vulnerabilities in electronic-voting systems and working with governments to make them more secure. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Silicon Valley, Seeking Diversity, Focuses on Blacks

This article in the New York Times reports on the diversity gap in Silicon Valley and describes some of the new efforts being undertaken to help black students to bridge the opportunity gap. EECS alumnus Erin Teague, director of product management at Yahoo, is quoted on her experience. "I didnt know what to dream for." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  

Online security braces for quantum revolution

This article in Nature examines the security ramifications of quantum computers, which are expected to be a reality in the next 5 to 30 years. The article references work in the area of lattice based cryptography done by Prof. Chris Peikert and his collaborators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cryptography  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  

A Tricky Path to Quantum-Safe Encryption

This article in Quanta Magazine examines the security ramifications of quantum computers, which are expected to be a reality in the next 5 to 30 years. The article references work in the area of lattice based cryptography done by Prof. Chris Peikert and his collaborators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cryptography  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  

IBMs Rodent Brain Chip Could Make Our Phones Hyper-Smart

In this MSN article, Prof. Jason Mars comments on TrueNorth, a chip created by IBM that has the same number of neurons as a small rodent brain. This chip can run deep learning algorithms in smaller spaces with considerably less electrical power, which will allow more AI onto phones and other tiny devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  

Can hackers take over Ann Arbor's traffic signals? U-M researcher discusses

In this MLive article about the security of municipal traffic signal systems, the work of CSE graduate student Branden Ghena is highlighted. Ghena received permission to hack the traffic lights at an unnamed Michigan municipality in 2014, where he quickly demonstrated how signals could be taken under the control of a hacker. Ann Arbor's system, he notes, is hardwired and would require a direct connection, rather than a wireless connection, to hack. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Can hackers take over traffic lights?

In this Washingtion Post article about the security of municipal traffic signal systems, the work of CSE graduate student Branden Ghena is highlighted. Ghena received permission to hack the traffic lights at an unnamed Michigan municipality in 2014, where he quickly demonstrated how signals could be taken under the control of a hacker. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

The Conversation: Big Data analyses depend on starting with clean data points

Join The Conversation about big data, where Prof. HV Jagadish has written about the need to avoid inaccuracies in large data sets and how an emphasis on clean data should motivate data collection and processing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  

Two sentences explaining why your self-driving car wont have a steering wheel

Prof. Edwin Olson comments on why, once an autonomous vehicles is operating, it is actually difficult for a human occupant to take control in an emergency. Prof. Olson is working on projects related to autonomous vehicles and transportation systems at the newly-opened Mcity test facility. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Scientists warn against Artificial Intelligence weapons

Prof. Michael Wellman confirms that the potential for danger from automated weapons systems should be taken seriously in this story that appeared on Detroit ABC affiliate WXYZ. Prof. Wellman was one of over a thousand AI researchers who recently signed a letter to the UN urging them to ban robotic weapons. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

The race is on to figure out what self-driving cars should look like

In this Washington Post article, Prof. Edwin Olson notes that we don't know what autonomous vehicles might look like in the future, since autonomy will change many factors in the way transportation is scheduled and executed. Prof. Olson has just launched a project to study a transportation on demand system built around autonomous vehicles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

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